defy

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About defy

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    Winx1881
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    http://ssuwtag.proboards18.com
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  • Location
    Wisconsin
  • Interests
    Riding horses, fludity, natural horsemanship
  1. I am homeschooled. Instead of going into my whole ramble about why, I'm just going to state this: I am an immensly independent learner, and I always have been. Neither of my parents teach me--We go through one of those little study-at-home programs. We decided to do it this way, because I always taught myself REGUARDLESS (since the beginning of high school, I never once listened to my teachers-I'd take the materials, zone out, and re-teach myself at home, later that night. I got straight As and Bs without fail) So, what are your opinions on this? Under certain situations, with certain people, is it ok to have a student teach themselves, through a program, if they are capable?
  2. Does Parrelli work for show horses?

    quote: Originally posted by Friesianwelshx: Rabid badgers vs gunsels - game at 6 Grudge match dodge ball...let's settle this once and for all!!! *derail*
  3. Does Parrelli work for show horses?

    quote: Originally posted by Wisconsin Cowgirl5: I'm glad everyone could keep this civil, Parrelli is such a touchy subject. I remember when John Lyons came out and everyone thought he was god! Exactly ^_^ And someday, maybe a couple years from now, this will all blow over and Parelli followers will be as normal as Lyons followers And everyone will get along again!!!
  4. Does Parrelli work for show horses?

    I stand by my statement that I 1) love Parelli and 2) agree that it is for 'leisure' riders, mostly. As for everyone who has had a bad experience with Parelli students, I apologize on their behalf. Not all of us are bad, I promise!!!!!!! As I have stated before, there are a lot of traditional trainers I adore. One even goes to the barn where I board. He's an absolutely AMAZING horseman (AMAZING) but sadly doesn't give lessons (cry). Now, for all of you poor souls who have been called a gunsil....whap the idiot who called you that with a dressage whip. When they whine, tell them you were using phase 4. And when they say that your still a gunsil, remind them that the Parelli definition of a gunsil is a 'horse-idiot' (I've only had the 'honor' *coughcough* of meeting one gunsil in my entire lifetime. She tied her horse up in cross ties and beat him into a pulp. No, I'm not kidding. She was promtly kicked out of the barn, here here) Now that that's all said and done, can we lower the hostility a teensy weeny bit? P.s. If non-Parelli users are gunsils...then Parelli users are offically Rabid Badgers...teehee. I'm sorry. It's just a funny picture. Try imagining a badger riding a horse....I'm going to crack up laughing everytime I get on my horse from this day forth. Ohh. My life is over [ 12-06-2007, 05:17 PM: Message edited by: The-Only-One ]
  5. gelding has a niping problem

    quote: Originally posted by bosbabies8: I did use the nail method on another colt I had and it worked. It hasnt seemed to work on the gelding. He loves to chew on his rope when he is being led and when puting his halter on he grabs the halter. He is aways grabing at his rope. When being led he always keep a eye on me to see if I am not watching him so he can nip me. He is very calculated at what he does. He is really smart. He is one you do not wan to teach him something you dont want him to do. He is a chacter. Aha! Now I know this behavior. He's obviously quite a little busy body, isn't he? Now, horses just love love love love LOVE putting things in their mouths. Specially curious horses. Clearly, your horse is one of those curious ones...I am quite supportive of the 'nail method' (I use a different version of it, but same concept) and I had a mare like this one...needless to say, the 'nail method' did not work! What I've started doing, and what has started working, is reverse psychology. She wants the rope in her mouth....FINE. But hold the rope so that they can't get it OUT of their mouth for a while. Just hold the ends so it stays in there, and then let go and walk away like nothing has happened. When he nips at you, come at it with a different personality. Instead of being all 'Oh on, you nipped be' by 'OH, you want to put your mouth by me? OK!' And then rub the STUFFING out of his muzzle. And I mean just don't sit there and rub (otherwise he'll think nipping is a good thing) Rub A LOT AND RUB HARD. And keep rubbing until he practically BEGS for you to let his muzzle go. Do not stop until it's clear that he's given up the 'fight' of wanting to nip and just wants to be LET GO. And when he wants to be let go...rub a while more(15 seconds, maybe?) so he gets the pictures. I don't know if that made any sense, but it worked wonders with my mare!
  6. gelding has a niping problem

    quote: Originally posted by bosbabies8: I did use the nail method on another colt I had and it worked. It hasnt seemed to work on the gelding. He loves to chew on his rope when he is being led and when puting his halter on he grabs the halter. He is aways grabing at his rope. When being led he always keep a eye on me to see if I am not watching him so he can nip me. He is very calculated at what he does. He is really smart. He is one you do not wan to teach him something you dont want him to do. He is a chacter. Aha! Now I know this behavior. He's obviously quite a little busy body, isn't he? Now, horses just love love love love LOVE putting things in their mouths. Specially curious horses. Clearly, your horse is one of those curious ones...I am quite supportive of the 'nail method' (I use a different version of it, but same concept) and I had a mare like this one...needless to say, the 'nail method' did not work! What I've started doing, and what has started working, is reverse psychology. She wants the rope in her mouth....FINE. But hold the rope so that they can't get it OUT of their mouth for a while. Just hold the ends so it stays in there, and then let go and walk away like nothing has happened. When he nips at you, come at it with a different personality. Instead of being all 'Oh on, you nipped be' by 'OH, you want to put your mouth by me? OK!' And then rub the STUFFING out of his muzzle. And I mean just don't sit there and rub (otherwise he'll think nipping is a good thing) Rub A LOT AND RUB HARD. And keep rubbing until he practically BEGS for you to let his muzzle go. Do not stop until it's clear that he's given up the 'fight' of wanting to nip and just wants to be LET GO. And when he wants to be let go...rub a while more(15 seconds, maybe?) so he gets the pictures. I don't know if that made any sense, but it worked wonders with my mare!
  7. Does Parrelli work for show horses?

    *coughcoughcough* Calm down everyone. It's ok I still love all of you, rather you do Parelli, or traditional horsemanship, or believe that 'broom-stick horsemanship' will be the next big thing. And now, to answer the original question: If you are asking will it work on your show horse, and will he/she respond to it...then yes. If you are asking will Parelli make your performance horse perform better...no. Parelli is NOT a performance program, unless your really into it, and get really far in the program. And to answer everyone's previous questions, no, there are practically NO competing 'Parelli' horses. I don't know is Shorty B Quick is competing, and if he is, it's in nothing big. Pat won Snaffle Bit Futility on a mule mare back in the stone age, Craig Johnson and Pat are buddies (I think his name is Craig Johnson..big time cutting trainer?) but Craig's horses are not 'Parelli.' David O'Conner uses Parelli ground work concepts with some horses, and some big European rider who's first name is Luca takes all of his competition horses to level 3. And that's it. No, Parelli is not for performance horses. Parelli is for everyday horse-people. Most of us (really, just about ALL of us) got into the program because we were desprete. We had trainers. They didn't help (write it off as bad trainers, I don't care. I have all the respect in the world for 'white hat' traditionalist...and let me tell you, there isn't a single one within a 200 miles radius of me) Most of us were afraid of our horses....or, if they're like me, I absolutely HATED my horse. So there's the key. That's why there are Parelli 'zealots'. Because when you're drowning, you're going to be pretty loyal to the person who threw you their particular brand of water wingies. Did I make any sense at all? :/ Because I have the habit of not making sense.
  8. Cantering on the correct lead :(

    Everything you do when riding effects the way your horse moves. If your horse can't canter a certain lead, it probably has something to do with the way you are sitting. But have no fear! I've tried this method, and had people try this method, a million and one times. If it's not something with the horse (pain or inability to canter that lead at all, which you have shown is not the problem in any case) this works! So the question is: If your horse can canter either lead...can you?? Watch how a horse moves at a canter, and the way his shoulders and back moves. Do you notice how the rider's position naturally blocks that movement the tiniest bit? This doesn't bother some horses...and it does bother other horses. Humans are naturally very one-sided. We mount on one side of the horse, lead on one side of the horse, and on and on and on. And even if you don't notice, your pelvic naturally tilts forwards on the left side when riding a horse. I know that because your horse has a problem with the right lead. If you want your horse to canter the right lead, then you need to canter the right lead. So here is my recommendation. Please please tell me how this works out Let's say you're riding Chance, and you want him to canter the right lead. I want you to shift the left side of your body way back, and the right side way forwards...almost like a diagonal! It's akward, but you usually have to be very extreme at first. Later on, you can make the movement much much much more subtle. Once your shifted inj the saddle that way (left side back, right side forwards) cue Chance for the canter by putting your left hand back by his haunches and your right hand forwards. Ask him to canter, and give him the tiniest little pat on the behind with your left hand (not even a cuff or a slap...just a nice, gentle pat). If everything is done right, he should naturally pick up the right lead Hope this helps!
  9. Cantering on the correct lead :(

    Everything you do when riding effects the way your horse moves. If your horse can't canter a certain lead, it probably has something to do with the way you are sitting. But have no fear! I've tried this method, and had people try this method, a million and one times. If it's not something with the horse (pain or inability to canter that lead at all, which you have shown is not the problem in any case) this works! So the question is: If your horse can canter either lead...can you?? Watch how a horse moves at a canter, and the way his shoulders and back moves. Do you notice how the rider's position naturally blocks that movement the tiniest bit? This doesn't bother some horses...and it does bother other horses. Humans are naturally very one-sided. We mount on one side of the horse, lead on one side of the horse, and on and on and on. And even if you don't notice, your pelvic naturally tilts forwards on the left side when riding a horse. I know that because your horse has a problem with the right lead. If you want your horse to canter the right lead, then you need to canter the right lead. So here is my recommendation. Please please tell me how this works out Let's say you're riding Chance, and you want him to canter the right lead. I want you to shift the left side of your body way back, and the right side way forwards...almost like a diagonal! It's akward, but you usually have to be very extreme at first. Later on, you can make the movement much much much more subtle. Once your shifted inj the saddle that way (left side back, right side forwards) cue Chance for the canter by putting your left hand back by his haunches and your right hand forwards. Ask him to canter, and give him the tiniest little pat on the behind with your left hand (not even a cuff or a slap...just a nice, gentle pat). If everything is done right, he should naturally pick up the right lead Hope this helps!
  10. Little Dippers Drill Team

    Jessica smiled at Kendra, bobbing her head randomly. As Chey took off, Jessica clicked her tounge, urging Juliet into a walk. She let the mare go wherever she wanted, the 'reins' hanging loosely over her neck. As Kendra began to practice, Jessica raised one hand high in the air, waving it wildly. "Uhh..Mrs. Kendra's Mom? What do you want me to do?"
  11. Little Dippers Drill Team

    Jessica watched the fight with what could only be called a mild interest. Her yellow-hazel eyes switched to whoever was speaking, emotionless and even slightly amused. Throughout the entire thing she had her hands in Juliet's mane, twisting the black hair around her finger. Her breathing, however, was slowly growing heavier and heavier. As soon as everyone quieted, Jessica took a deep breath, threw her head back, and screamed. When she dropped her face again, her cheeks were slightly red and her breathing was ragged. "OH, WELL!" Jessica began, "THIS STREAK HERE? IN MY HAIR?" she pointed at the dyed red streak in her hair, "IS FAKE. DO YOU HEAR THAT? FAKE! I WISH IT WAS REAL, BUT IT'S NOT. IT'S NOT REAL AND I'M JUST A SILLY GIRL WITH A FAKE RED STREAK YELLING FOR NO REASON. AND YOU KNOW WHAT ELSE?" Jessica lamented, "I HAVE TO BRUSH MY TEETH EVERY MORNING AND EVERY NIGHT, AND SOMETIMES IN THE AFTERNOON IF I EAT PEANUT BUTTER. IT'S A COMPLETELY GOOD WASTE OF TIME, BUT BACTERIA JUST HAS NO FEELINGS WHAT SO EVER!!!" Jessica stopped, breathing raggedly, her hands braced on Juliet's whithers. Her eyes, however, sparkled with mirth, and she grinned like Cheshire cat. [ 09-12-2007, 08:13 PM: Message edited by: The-Only-One ]
  12. Little Dippers Drill Team

    "Pfft. I'll work on the drill with you, Kendra!" Jessica called, entering the arena. She abandoned her training stick by the gate, and flipped the loose end if the lead rope over Juliet's black maned neck. Tying a knot to the bottom loop, next to the clip, Jessica put the tiniest bit of pressure on the lead rope. Juliet dropped her head and Jessica hopped once, laying her stomach across Juliet's neck. The bay promptly raised her neck, and Jessica slipped onto her back, swinging her left leg over, riding bareback. "TADA!" Jessica crowed. She loved theatrics, even if her friends knew she was just being silly. "Shall we get started then? Juliet's having problems with that one lead change...I think she thinks she's to old for this," Jessica added with a chuckle.
  13. Little Dippers Drill Team

    Jessica finally located her missing lead rope, scooping it up in a rush and tossing it over Juliet's mane. The mare snorted indignantly, and Jessica rubbed her nose in apology. "There there," the brunette cooed as she clipped the lead rope to the bottom loop of Juliet's thin, red rope halter. Turning, Jessica fished a four foot long, fiber glass, bright orange training stick from her tack trunk. Looped through the leather at the end of t a stick was a six foot, 1/4 inch thick piece of string. Sastified, Jessica gave a farewell nod to Brody and trotted off down the isle, Juliet jogging besides her. Reaching the already busy arena in record time, Jessica stuck her head over the top of the gate. "Y'all mind if I do some ground work in here?" she questioned the drill team members, smiling her patented lop sided smile. "I'll stay out of the way, promise. Cross my heart, hope to die," Jessica made an X over her heart, emphasizing.
  14. Little Dippers Drill Team

    "Oh. Hi Brody!" Jessica responded in a cheery voice. Stretching, she flailed wildly to the left of Juliet's stall until she managed to snag the mare's red rope halter. Sastified, she disappeared back into the darkness, returning moments later with the bay in tow. She unlatched the stall door from the inside, giving Brody a reassuring 'I appreciate the work you do around the barn but move out of my way NOW' smile, leading Juliet out in the aisle. One hand was slipped under the side strap of Juliet's halter as Jessica stood very still, one hand on her dark blue jean clad hip. "My leadrope, my lead rope, where in the world is my lead rope..." Jessica chanted in a sing song voice. She was almost famous for her lack of organization skills as she released Juliet's halter. She trusted the 'old woman' to stay still as she shifted through her tack trunk.
  15. Little Dippers Drill Team

    Jessica was in Juliet's stall, her face buried in the bay mare's black mane. She was murmuring nonsensical words to the beautiful quarter horse mare. Her right hand was between Juliet's ears, alternativly scratching the base of first the right one, and then the left. Her left hand was on Juliet's withers, also scratching. They were perfect for each other, really. Jessica's hair was the color of Juliet's coat, and their shoulders were the same height. Besides that, they just seemed to fit together. Hearing someone suddenly yell 'JADE', Jessica jolted. Juliet snorted and shifted nervously, and Jessica scratched the mare's neck. "Hush up," she insisted, turning. The 16 year old stuck her black tank top clad torso over the bottom half of the stall door, whistling and looking down the aisle. "Who goes there?" she called, smiling as Juliet came up behind her, nudging her in the back.