leahdeffenbaugh

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Everything posted by leahdeffenbaugh

  1. You want win/race pics of your ex-racer QH/TB/Arab??

    quote: Originally posted by soicanhelp: As for Universal Dancer, she raced fifteen times, winning only the last one at Rillito, AZ on March 4, 1990. Prior to that she was 2nd or 3rd a dozen times. At times Universal Dancer was ridden by Laffit Pincay, Willie Shoemaker, Gary Stevens, Alex Solis, and the late Ron Hansen. Took me a while to come back to this post. Thank you so much for this info! She was a decently bred mare, and it looks like she had some very famous people on her back! Any way, Thanks again!
  2. Pit Bulls Kill Miniature Horse

    I don't like pits.. I know its the owners, media gives them a bad rap etc etc. But, why don't I hear about a golden retriver killing its elderly neighbor? Or an Airedale attacking and killing its child owner after spending YEARS living in a loving home with them. Why is it when I take my dog to the dog park, its always the pits who run over, act agressive, and bully my dog until I have to leave (one even hurt him once). WHY is it that pits are responcible for such a high percentage of attacks. Is it really just that pits tend to have such horrible owners? Is it the breeding? What is it? I have known some LOVELY pit crosses.. but.. I don't trust pits.
  3. Jack Russell terriers

    My Jack cross is great! Yes.. he is high energy, but, just like a horse, I cater to his needs, and he is a good animal. So, he gets exercised EVERY day. If time is short, I jump on my bike and make him sprint for a good 25 mins. Heh, that usually takes the edge off Besides that, he is TRAINED. Oh, he knows holy **** would come down on him if he were to bite a horse's tail! Yikes! Long story short.. its a high energy breed, that needs to be trained. My dog is VERY well behavied. I get people asking about "where can I get a dog like THIS!" on a daily basis. Ike goes with me every where, and can pass a "good citizen test" with flying colors. So long story short, I think they are good dogs in the right hands. You have to know how to train them, and you HAVE TO EXERCISE THEM.
  4. Apps and their coloring..UPDATED..Picts page 2

    quote: Originally posted by SpottedTApps: Typically only the black based horses lose their manes & tails. Has something to do with the LP gene and coloring. This is the first "rat tailed" App I've ever had. Reading up on it, she will likely grow a lot of it back, but it will never be full and fluffy again. yikes.. heh I have an appy weanling, she has already changed color a bit, some new spots over her body, some roan hairs on her neck... So HOW do you predict if they are going to lose their tail? She is an appy / TB cross. Her dad (the appy) has a very thick tail, same goes for her grandparents on the appy side.. My Filly Sire Gransire Grand-dam I don't have any photos of her tail but she has a full one.
  5. Probios???

    I have had good luck with probiotics in increasing appetite, weight, and reducing "hay bellies." The research is still out, its not conclusively proven yet.. it has not been disproven. probiotics DO show influence on the horse's digestive system. To me that is significant. According to Susan Evans Garlinghouse, DVM, MSc: "Here are some of the things that have been reported in the empirical research (which you should be aware, were done by only one research company on their own proprietary strain and may not necessarily apply to ALL brands and types of probios)---when fed to young, growing horses, the incidence of developmental orthopedic disease was significantly reduced, possible because the bugs release enzymes that increase phosphorus utilization, which in turn benefits the quality of developing bone. Two, they found that in broodmares fed probios culture, the amount of milk produced did not increase, but the butter fat content did 9this is also why probiotic cultures are commonly fed to dairy cows), and so foals nursing these supplemented mares grew faster and were bigger and heavier at 12 and 18 months. Three, when probios were fed to a large group of horses all undergoing a steady workload (they were lesson horses at a riding school), supplemented horses maintained or gained weight better without additional food than did horses not getting the probios.
  6. Probios???

    I have had good luck with probiotics in increasing appetite, weight, and reducing "hay bellies." The research is still out, its not conclusively proven yet.. it has not been disproven. probiotics DO show influence on the horse's digestive system. To me that is significant. According to Susan Evans Garlinghouse, DVM, MSc: "Here are some of the things that have been reported in the empirical research (which you should be aware, were done by only one research company on their own proprietary strain and may not necessarily apply to ALL brands and types of probios)---when fed to young, growing horses, the incidence of developmental orthopedic disease was significantly reduced, possible because the bugs release enzymes that increase phosphorus utilization, which in turn benefits the quality of developing bone. Two, they found that in broodmares fed probios culture, the amount of milk produced did not increase, but the butter fat content did 9this is also why probiotic cultures are commonly fed to dairy cows), and so foals nursing these supplemented mares grew faster and were bigger and heavier at 12 and 18 months. Three, when probios were fed to a large group of horses all undergoing a steady workload (they were lesson horses at a riding school), supplemented horses maintained or gained weight better without additional food than did horses not getting the probios.
  7. Probios???

    .Probiotics are the "live cultures" in yogurt etc. They are micro organisms that naturally live in the horse's gut. They are needed to fully break down hay fibers to get the nutrients from them. they will not hurt your horses stomach, they occur naturally Some times horses do not have enough of these organisms, as they can die off from stress, antibiotics etc. So, feeding a probiotic helps boost the levels back up. Some people only feed them at times of stress, others feed them daily. And, I think the vet might have to be out to try to find the cause of the diarrhea. Could be his teeth, ulcers, sickness, etc..
  8. Probios???

    .Probiotics are the "live cultures" in yogurt etc. They are micro organisms that naturally live in the horse's gut. They are needed to fully break down hay fibers to get the nutrients from them. they will not hurt your horses stomach, they occur naturally Some times horses do not have enough of these organisms, as they can die off from stress, antibiotics etc. So, feeding a probiotic helps boost the levels back up. Some people only feed them at times of stress, others feed them daily. And, I think the vet might have to be out to try to find the cause of the diarrhea. Could be his teeth, ulcers, sickness, etc..
  9. Why does it hurt more now?

    Oh no Goldentoes! You are going to really make me hold on with every last once I have now! I am 29, knock on wood, haven't come off in a good 6+ years.. Heh, but I know its going to hurt more when I do! Man, back when I was 9 years old, falling off was NOTHING, heh used to do it about every day when I was learning how to canter... Teen years.. falling still wasn't too bad (except for breaking my tail bone, that hurt!). But now.. I feel more aches and pains from things that wouldn't phase me. I didn't sign up for this getting old stuff!
  10. Is it time to euthanize: see cross post...

    ok, now that I have read the story. First off What a hard thing to go through. And long story short, I think his time has come. His quality of life sounds misarable, and I hate to say it, but it sounds like keeping him alive is NOT in his best interest. I think I would try to explain to the DH (and maybe the vet can help?) that he is NOT getting better, and why wait longer? Yes he still nickers now. Let those be your last memories. Trying to keep him alive sounds like more of an issue of not wanting to let go, rather then what is best for the horse. Does he really want old Phen to go when he is in HORRIBLE condition, and not just bad? Does he really want to see the horse SUFFER more? I know its hard, I had to put my beloved horse down when he broke his leg... no sickness, wasn't old, didn't get a long good bye. Broke my heart. But it was THE RIGHT THING TO DO for that horse. The more we have loved them, the more it hurts when they go. Thats the price we pay for the joy they bring in our life. We have to always put their best interest first.. Oh and from another 90's "B" graduate pony clubber! [ 10-20-2007, 01:56 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  11. Is it time to euthanize: see cross post...

    ok, now that I have read the story. First off What a hard thing to go through. And long story short, I think his time has come. His quality of life sounds misarable, and I hate to say it, but it sounds like keeping him alive is NOT in his best interest. I think I would try to explain to the DH (and maybe the vet can help?) that he is NOT getting better, and why wait longer? Yes he still nickers now. Let those be your last memories. Trying to keep him alive sounds like more of an issue of not wanting to let go, rather then what is best for the horse. Does he really want old Phen to go when he is in HORRIBLE condition, and not just bad? Does he really want to see the horse SUFFER more? I know its hard, I had to put my beloved horse down when he broke his leg... no sickness, wasn't old, didn't get a long good bye. Broke my heart. But it was THE RIGHT THING TO DO for that horse. The more we have loved them, the more it hurts when they go. Thats the price we pay for the joy they bring in our life. We have to always put their best interest first.. Oh and from another 90's "B" graduate pony clubber! [ 10-20-2007, 01:56 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  12. Is it time to euthanize: see cross post...

    Here, its much easy to read it here if you just copy and paste rather then cross post QUOTE]Originally posted by Sylves: WE MISSED THE SIGNS OF THE ABSESS: Old Phen's absess exploded out the cornonary band early/mid August. We totally missed the lameness associated to absesses because he has been always off, and he has had his two front feet nerved because of Navicular. When we saw the swelling and the drainage, we immediately called out the vet. HOW WE HAVE TREATED THE ABSESS: We have been using Pennicillan (SP?) off and on over the last 3 months. We have tried wrapping his legs with poultice for the swelling. We have soaked his foot and coranonary band with espon salt and betadine twice a day. We have had literally 1/2 of the sole of his foot dug out by the vet to help drainage. We squirt betadine into the "hole" on his foot. The Betadine now travels under the frog and it exits out the heal... for real! SOME MORE WAYS THAT WE'VE TREATED THE ABSESS: What else have we done... (thinking****)? We made a sugar and betadine paste for the hole, and we used vet wrap to keep it in and the dirt out. We wrapped the hoof for a while, but have stopped doing that. We opted for the vet to "flush out the veins" using a IV and broad spectrum antibiotic. That was sometime in September. Our vet has come out almost weekly to continue advising us and to continue digging more of the sole out. WHAT THE ABSESS LOOKS LIKE TODAY: To this day, the wound, hole and swelling has not improved. The wound on the coronary band still drains. When Phenn gets up for his daily "treatments," foamy, red puss exits through the holes. The infection smelled horrific for a while, but it is now slightly better. PHENN'S HISTORY: Old Phenn is 23 years old. He was retired at least 15 years ago because of serious navicular, ring bone, side bone...the list goes on. You name, that horse has it. He's crippled. THE POOR BOY LAYS DOWN ALL OF THE TIME!: He lays down...I would say at least 80% of the day. He can get to water, but there was a point back in September that he wasn't getting to water; we had to set out a bucket on the ground for him. The vet was thinking that this infection began because of his laying down (ie: lack of blood flow to the hooves??) THE DISAGREEMENT BETWEEN DH AND ME: I don't think MR. Phenn will make it to this winter. My husband and I disagree about euthanizing. I feely strongly that Phenn NEEDS to be let go. My husband feels that as long as Phenn nickers at my DH, Phenn deserves to continue his life. TRAGIC LOSS COMPOUNDS THE PROBLEM: BTW, Phenn's other three buddies, Quincy, SHadow, and Sparky were killed in September to a lightening strike. Phenn has no buddies now. OTHER PROBLEMS FOR OLD PHENN: To top things off, Phenn looks like a starving, dieing horse. His ribs and hips stick out. It makes me sick looking at him. NOT MY HORSE, BUT MY DH'S HORSE: Phenn was my DH's horse back in high school. I never rode Phenn. My DH is very attached to this horse. YOUR FEEDBACK?: Okay, so.... do any of you have ideas about what more we could do for old Phenn? I elect to euthanize the poor soul, but it's not my place to make that decision. Plus, after losing three of the family horses last month, this has been SOOOO difficult for my DH! Have you ever heard of an absess lurking around the hoof for this long????
  13. Is it time to euthanize: see cross post...

    Here, its much easy to read it here if you just copy and paste rather then cross post QUOTE]Originally posted by Sylves: WE MISSED THE SIGNS OF THE ABSESS: Old Phen's absess exploded out the cornonary band early/mid August. We totally missed the lameness associated to absesses because he has been always off, and he has had his two front feet nerved because of Navicular. When we saw the swelling and the drainage, we immediately called out the vet. HOW WE HAVE TREATED THE ABSESS: We have been using Pennicillan (SP?) off and on over the last 3 months. We have tried wrapping his legs with poultice for the swelling. We have soaked his foot and coranonary band with espon salt and betadine twice a day. We have had literally 1/2 of the sole of his foot dug out by the vet to help drainage. We squirt betadine into the "hole" on his foot. The Betadine now travels under the frog and it exits out the heal... for real! SOME MORE WAYS THAT WE'VE TREATED THE ABSESS: What else have we done... (thinking****)? We made a sugar and betadine paste for the hole, and we used vet wrap to keep it in and the dirt out. We wrapped the hoof for a while, but have stopped doing that. We opted for the vet to "flush out the veins" using a IV and broad spectrum antibiotic. That was sometime in September. Our vet has come out almost weekly to continue advising us and to continue digging more of the sole out. WHAT THE ABSESS LOOKS LIKE TODAY: To this day, the wound, hole and swelling has not improved. The wound on the coronary band still drains. When Phenn gets up for his daily "treatments," foamy, red puss exits through the holes. The infection smelled horrific for a while, but it is now slightly better. PHENN'S HISTORY: Old Phenn is 23 years old. He was retired at least 15 years ago because of serious navicular, ring bone, side bone...the list goes on. You name, that horse has it. He's crippled. THE POOR BOY LAYS DOWN ALL OF THE TIME!: He lays down...I would say at least 80% of the day. He can get to water, but there was a point back in September that he wasn't getting to water; we had to set out a bucket on the ground for him. The vet was thinking that this infection began because of his laying down (ie: lack of blood flow to the hooves??) THE DISAGREEMENT BETWEEN DH AND ME: I don't think MR. Phenn will make it to this winter. My husband and I disagree about euthanizing. I feely strongly that Phenn NEEDS to be let go. My husband feels that as long as Phenn nickers at my DH, Phenn deserves to continue his life. TRAGIC LOSS COMPOUNDS THE PROBLEM: BTW, Phenn's other three buddies, Quincy, SHadow, and Sparky were killed in September to a lightening strike. Phenn has no buddies now. OTHER PROBLEMS FOR OLD PHENN: To top things off, Phenn looks like a starving, dieing horse. His ribs and hips stick out. It makes me sick looking at him. NOT MY HORSE, BUT MY DH'S HORSE: Phenn was my DH's horse back in high school. I never rode Phenn. My DH is very attached to this horse. YOUR FEEDBACK?: Okay, so.... do any of you have ideas about what more we could do for old Phenn? I elect to euthanize the poor soul, but it's not my place to make that decision. Plus, after losing three of the family horses last month, this has been SOOOO difficult for my DH! Have you ever heard of an absess lurking around the hoof for this long????
  14. Alfalfa Hay?

    Well, what is he getting besides the strategy? Is he on pasture? Grass hay? How are his teeth? Any signs of ulcers? If he is healthy, and just needs more calories, Alfalfa might be a good way to go. When you say dehydrated alfalfa, do you mean alfalfa cubes? What form where you planning to feed? I like alfalfa, its high in protein (most processed products are around %15), Calcium, and lysine. Which are all very important nutrients for a working horse (and deficient in many grass hays) Its a good addition to many diets (for a healthy horse), and shouldn't cause problems as long as it is not the ONLY thing fed. Alfalfa is really popular out here in CA, and we do see problems with intestinal stones and other issues from horses on a 100% alfalfa diet. This is a good article on feeding alfalfa Alfalfa
  15. Alfalfa Hay?

    Well, what is he getting besides the strategy? Is he on pasture? Grass hay? How are his teeth? Any signs of ulcers? If he is healthy, and just needs more calories, Alfalfa might be a good way to go. When you say dehydrated alfalfa, do you mean alfalfa cubes? What form where you planning to feed? I like alfalfa, its high in protein (most processed products are around %15), Calcium, and lysine. Which are all very important nutrients for a working horse (and deficient in many grass hays) Its a good addition to many diets (for a healthy horse), and shouldn't cause problems as long as it is not the ONLY thing fed. Alfalfa is really popular out here in CA, and we do see problems with intestinal stones and other issues from horses on a 100% alfalfa diet. This is a good article on feeding alfalfa Alfalfa
  16. Suprised at cost of vet services today...

    yep! I would say that is a good deal! I paid $145 for just vaccinations. You got an exam, teeth work, coggins, sedation, and sheath cleaning for less then $20 extra compared to what my vet charges! Oh, but my bill included a $20 split farm call fee. The vet office is across the street, less then a half mile away, I think I will walk my horse there next time [ 10-20-2007, 01:29 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  17. Suprised at cost of vet services today...

    yep! I would say that is a good deal! I paid $145 for just vaccinations. You got an exam, teeth work, coggins, sedation, and sheath cleaning for less then $20 extra compared to what my vet charges! Oh, but my bill included a $20 split farm call fee. The vet office is across the street, less then a half mile away, I think I will walk my horse there next time [ 10-20-2007, 01:29 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  18. How much do you pay...???

    quote: Originally posted by funkeymonkey000: quote:Originally posted by OTTB: I am in the CA bay area.. and every thing is expensive here. I pay $50 every 4-5 weeks for trims on my weanling. That includes photos and some gait analysis. He takes his time and does a good job. Shoes average $150-$200 Thats why I am paying my trimmer to come out so often! I am hoping to avoid shoes in the future! wow OTTB! I sure feel lucky. I am in the bay area and my farrier is wonderful. I pay $50 for full trim and half shoes. Not to mention, I call him and he either answers right then or returns my call and is out at my barn within 48 hrs. I love him!! Well keep him close! Mine just texted messaged me to reschedule the second time in a week. But he does a good job, farrier school and college educated. My filly has some issues, so I need a real expert. And The shoes.. you will find that is what they charge at the training barns around here. I always had OTTBs with feet that needed major rehab, so I always paid more for the really experienced guys.
  19. How much do you pay...???

    I am in the CA bay area.. and every thing is expensive here. I pay $50 every 4-5 weeks for trims on my weanling. That includes photos and some gait analysis. He takes his time and does a good job. Shoes average $150-$200 Thats why I am paying my trimmer to come out so often! I am hoping to avoid shoes in the future!
  20. When would YOU use draw reins?

    quote: Originally posted by Tigger'sGotGame: quote:Originally posted by silverdreamer3: I am with OTTB, that is also how I use them. They are only there "just in case." my tigger is alost an OTTB, and i wouldnt never dream of putting them on him. i almost never use them, i know an entire arsenal of things to conquor most problems; which make gadgets unneccesary. Actually, I believe she was reffering to my screen name, and not that they have to be used on all Off Track TBs just in case. And I agree, that correct classical training, with time can correct all training issues (not physical ones). But, in the case of this saddlebred, I still have a lovely scar on my chin, from the day he reared and threw his head back so far that he popped me in chin hard enough to require six stitches. I was lucky I wasn't knocked out. Draw reins, used in this manner, are not so much of a "quick fix" but a safety and control issue.In capable hands, they can serve better then martingales, which leave little control to the rider. The horse graduated out of the draw reins and is going nicely (now years later).
  21. Ok... so, I want to spend under $100. Bobby's are nice, but just a bit more then I want to spend, same with bevel, ovation etc. (I don't need this bridle to last forever). I would make the stretch of a treadstone, but with the exchange rate at the moment, buying in pounds doesn't make sence. I have read too many reviews for a $100 purchase So, ordering from dover is easy, I keep hearing good things about suffolk despite the low low price (some reviews said they were better then crown???). But crown has a bridle I like more (the event bridle, flash with brass brow). Is the quaily really less even though it is more then twice as much? I am sorry, I know there are a ton of posts like this.. Any way, I have a new horse to ride no more sitting on my duff at the barn every night as I wait for my weanling to eat her grain And, I need a new bridle (I like to ride in my own tack). I don't to spend a ton, looking for a nice quality schooling bridle. I want the best leather / stiching I can get for the money Doesn't need to come with reins. Suggestions? [ 10-19-2007, 06:26 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  22. Does anybody feed Dairy Whey?

    I have never fed the powder, but I have a PICKY weanling who I have been supplementing with foal lac to get extra fat / protein into her. It says on the package it is excellent of putting condition onto competition horses. The main ingredient is whey protein. I have seen lactose free whey (EXPENSIVE!) marketed for horses. I don't know if the regular kind is safe or not... Calf Manna which I also feed also has whey in it [ 10-18-2007, 07:32 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  23. Does anybody feed Dairy Whey?

    I have never fed the powder, but I have a PICKY weanling who I have been supplementing with foal lac to get extra fat / protein into her. It says on the package it is excellent of putting condition onto competition horses. The main ingredient is whey protein. I have seen lactose free whey (EXPENSIVE!) marketed for horses. I don't know if the regular kind is safe or not... Calf Manna which I also feed also has whey in it [ 10-18-2007, 07:32 PM: Message edited by: OTTB ]
  24. whisky Jack doing very well

    Great to hear! You might want to look into this supplement. Its called Tract Gard "Equine GI tract re-hydrator, antacid, digestaid & electrolyte salt. TractGard pulls water into the GI tract to help reduce the risk of impaction colic, offset acidity from grain administration, and provide electrolytes. TractGard also contains Diamond V Yeast and Linseed meal to aid protein digestion and improve hair and hoof growth." They sell it at differnt sites, I found it HERE Has good user reviews.. "This product works wonders! I have several Quarter Horses, but my 13 year old barrel gelding has had issues with impaction colic. He was never a big drinker and when it got cold out he drank even less. After having a bad spell with him impacting I had to find something so I figured I would give TractGard a try. I have been using this product for almost 2 years now and have had no more problems with impactions."
  25. whisky Jack doing very well

    Great to hear! You might want to look into this supplement. Its called Tract Gard "Equine GI tract re-hydrator, antacid, digestaid & electrolyte salt. TractGard pulls water into the GI tract to help reduce the risk of impaction colic, offset acidity from grain administration, and provide electrolytes. TractGard also contains Diamond V Yeast and Linseed meal to aid protein digestion and improve hair and hoof growth." They sell it at differnt sites, I found it HERE Has good user reviews.. "This product works wonders! I have several Quarter Horses, but my 13 year old barrel gelding has had issues with impaction colic. He was never a big drinker and when it got cold out he drank even less. After having a bad spell with him impacting I had to find something so I figured I would give TractGard a try. I have been using this product for almost 2 years now and have had no more problems with impactions."