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  1. Ulcers/Aloe Juice/toxic or not???

    The Gastrogurard website ( http://gastrogard.us.merial.com/faq.asp ) says the below: "Like human ulcers, stomach acid appears to be the main cause of equine ulcers. Excess acid can "eat" through the protective lining and damage the stomach. The high prevalence of ulcers seen in performance horses results from many factors including the way the horses are fed and managed. Intensity of training also may contribute to ulcer formation, but the exact cause remains undetermined. Helicobacter pylori, bacteria that are a factor in the development of human ulcers, have not been isolated from horse stomachs and are currently not considered to be a cause of ulcers in horses. In addition, grains and pelleted concentrates can increase the production of gastrin, a hormone that stimulates acid production. Therefore, horses that are fed high grain diets are more likely to have higher gastric acidity than horses offered free choice forage without grain." I suppose the key phrase in this paragraph is "...the exact cause in undetermined." Thus, no one knows for sure the exact cause of equine ulcers! It is all a guess, and I would venture to say that most vets and drug companies consider the above paragraph to be generally true. My personal view is that since many foals and performance horses seem prone to ulcers, an infection may be the likely cause for both. In foals, you have an underdeveloped immune system and in race horses, you have stressed animals with impaired immune systems. I think most horsemen appreciate most race horses as being emotional animals that are stressed. A common symptom of a emotionally stressed horse is that they go off feed. Further, it is quite common to see many horses "shake", waiting for a race, etc, etc. You can bet this is a function of mental stress! I mean, why shouldn't this be? Why are horses immune from mental stresses while humans are? I think it is a pretty well known fact that stress in humans causes a reduction in immune response and a reduction in Hydrochloric acid formation in the stomach. You may say: "Hey, wait a minute! I thought the conventional logic was that ulcers are caused by an over production of acid!" If that is true, then please explain how stress, which often causes a decrease in stomach HCl acid can cause ulcers? I will repost my explanation for that as explained by Dr. Fergusson from the 1930s: "In health, the acid balance is maintained by the normal production of hydrochloric acid in certain cells of the stomach; should this production fall short of bodily necessity, the balance must be made up. Other acids, which are the products of decomposition in the body, such as lactic acid, fatty acids, carbonic acid, uric acid and others, are called in to fill the HCl deficiency. These however being abnormal constituents of the great chemical laboratory of the body (HCl is the only normally produced acid of the body), are ill-adapted to the requirements, for they are unable to keep in solution many of the salts which must be thrown off as waste matter in bodily excretions, the sweat, the expired air, the urine and the feces. In the effort for the body to provide acid of some sort these harmful acids, become a monkey-wench in the machinery and the condition known as "acidosis" results with symptoms of general systemic poisoning. Conversely, when the hydrogen-ion concentration of lymph falls into the acid side, due to excess production of lactic acid, fatty acids, carbonic acids, uric acid and like poisons, there is an effort on the part of the body to neutralize these with alkaline salts, such as calcium, sodium, potassium, ammonium and others. These also, being foreign to bodily economy, produce the condition known as "alkalosis", but often attended with general collapse." Thus, you see that a stressed race horse which does not produce proper amounts of HCl acid may end up with a stomach that is filled with the wrong type of acid aggravating an ulcer condition or, if my suspicion is correct, allow a harmful equine stomach bacterium to flourish and actually cause an ulcer. The "body terrain" often dictates the body as being healthy or diseased! The wrong terrain (low HCl content in the stomach) may open the horse up to an environment hospitable for as of yet unknown, equine ulcer bacterium. I tend to view the past performance of therapeutics in the human ulcer to be very telling. Exactly the same old explanation for the human ulcer is now being applied to the equine ulcer's cause. That is, a condition of stress, mismanagement, wrong food, which causes increased acid in the stomach were all said to be the cause of human ulcers in the past. We found out only recently how wrong we were. I suggest you google the Aussy researcher that discovered the human, Helicobacter pylori. It is a really fascinating story of how a very tenacious researcher discovered that bacterium and how he fought his way against a preconceived science bias to prove the existence of that ulcer causing bacteria. This was a very hard bug to detect, I might add and there is no reason to think that a similar bacteria may not also be involved in the horse. Just because we have not cultured one as of yet, does not mean that one is not the cause, hence, the human example! Actually another very interesting website has this to say about Helicobacter pylori and the horse: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available...urnMSThesis.pdf "Traditionally Helicobacter was not thought to be present in the equine stomach, although why such a carte blanche assumption was made is unclear. Whilst it is true that Helicobacter has never been cultured from the equine stomach, an increasing amount of recent circumstantial evidence suggests that it is present." Mmmmmmmmm, maybe it is the cause! If so, one needs more than the soothing qualities of slippery elm or Aloe vera to combat it. doug
  2. Ulcers/Aloe Juice/toxic or not???

    The Gastrogurard website ( http://gastrogard.us.merial.com/faq.asp ) says the below: "Like human ulcers, stomach acid appears to be the main cause of equine ulcers. Excess acid can "eat" through the protective lining and damage the stomach. The high prevalence of ulcers seen in performance horses results from many factors including the way the horses are fed and managed. Intensity of training also may contribute to ulcer formation, but the exact cause remains undetermined. Helicobacter pylori, bacteria that are a factor in the development of human ulcers, have not been isolated from horse stomachs and are currently not considered to be a cause of ulcers in horses. In addition, grains and pelleted concentrates can increase the production of gastrin, a hormone that stimulates acid production. Therefore, horses that are fed high grain diets are more likely to have higher gastric acidity than horses offered free choice forage without grain." I suppose the key phrase in this paragraph is "...the exact cause in undetermined." Thus, no one knows for sure the exact cause of equine ulcers! It is all a guess, and I would venture to say that most vets and drug companies consider the above paragraph to be generally true. My personal view is that since many foals and performance horses seem prone to ulcers, an infection may be the likely cause for both. In foals, you have an underdeveloped immune system and in race horses, you have stressed animals with impaired immune systems. I think most horsemen appreciate most race horses as being emotional animals that are stressed. A common symptom of a emotionally stressed horse is that they go off feed. Further, it is quite common to see many horses "shake", waiting for a race, etc, etc. You can bet this is a function of mental stress! I mean, why shouldn't this be? Why are horses immune from mental stresses while humans are? I think it is a pretty well known fact that stress in humans causes a reduction in immune response and a reduction in Hydrochloric acid formation in the stomach. You may say: "Hey, wait a minute! I thought the conventional logic was that ulcers are caused by an over production of acid!" If that is true, then please explain how stress, which often causes a decrease in stomach HCl acid can cause ulcers? I will repost my explanation for that as explained by Dr. Fergusson from the 1930s: "In health, the acid balance is maintained by the normal production of hydrochloric acid in certain cells of the stomach; should this production fall short of bodily necessity, the balance must be made up. Other acids, which are the products of decomposition in the body, such as lactic acid, fatty acids, carbonic acid, uric acid and others, are called in to fill the HCl deficiency. These however being abnormal constituents of the great chemical laboratory of the body (HCl is the only normally produced acid of the body), are ill-adapted to the requirements, for they are unable to keep in solution many of the salts which must be thrown off as waste matter in bodily excretions, the sweat, the expired air, the urine and the feces. In the effort for the body to provide acid of some sort these harmful acids, become a monkey-wench in the machinery and the condition known as "acidosis" results with symptoms of general systemic poisoning. Conversely, when the hydrogen-ion concentration of lymph falls into the acid side, due to excess production of lactic acid, fatty acids, carbonic acids, uric acid and like poisons, there is an effort on the part of the body to neutralize these with alkaline salts, such as calcium, sodium, potassium, ammonium and others. These also, being foreign to bodily economy, produce the condition known as "alkalosis", but often attended with general collapse." Thus, you see that a stressed race horse which does not produce proper amounts of HCl acid may end up with a stomach that is filled with the wrong type of acid aggravating an ulcer condition or, if my suspicion is correct, allow a harmful equine stomach bacterium to flourish and actually cause an ulcer. The "body terrain" often dictates the body as being healthy or diseased! The wrong terrain (low HCl content in the stomach) may open the horse up to an environment hospitable for as of yet unknown, equine ulcer bacterium. I tend to view the past performance of therapeutics in the human ulcer to be very telling. Exactly the same old explanation for the human ulcer is now being applied to the equine ulcer's cause. That is, a condition of stress, mismanagement, wrong food, which causes increased acid in the stomach were all said to be the cause of human ulcers in the past. We found out only recently how wrong we were. I suggest you google the Aussy researcher that discovered the human, Helicobacter pylori. It is a really fascinating story of how a very tenacious researcher discovered that bacterium and how he fought his way against a preconceived science bias to prove the existence of that ulcer causing bacteria. This was a very hard bug to detect, I might add and there is no reason to think that a similar bacteria may not also be involved in the horse. Just because we have not cultured one as of yet, does not mean that one is not the cause, hence, the human example! Actually another very interesting website has this to say about Helicobacter pylori and the horse: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available...urnMSThesis.pdf "Traditionally Helicobacter was not thought to be present in the equine stomach, although why such a carte blanche assumption was made is unclear. Whilst it is true that Helicobacter has never been cultured from the equine stomach, an increasing amount of recent circumstantial evidence suggests that it is present." Mmmmmmmmm, maybe it is the cause! If so, one needs more than the soothing qualities of slippery elm or Aloe vera to combat it. doug
  3. Advice needed for horse eating less hay...

    Hay in a horse's diet is most important and vital to its well being. A horse should be mulching on a good quality hay most of the day to my way of thinking. Free choice a must. I consider your two flakes to be way under what is needed for a horse. The fact that he is not even eating that suggests to me that you may be feeding a low quality hay. You should be come expert at what is in the hay, how it looks, how it smells, etc. There can be much variation in hay from bale to bale from even the same pasture. A horse's stomach is designed to eat a good forage most of it's waking day.
  4. Advice needed for horse eating less hay...

    Hay in a horse's diet is most important and vital to its well being. A horse should be mulching on a good quality hay most of the day to my way of thinking. Free choice a must. I consider your two flakes to be way under what is needed for a horse. The fact that he is not even eating that suggests to me that you may be feeding a low quality hay. You should be come expert at what is in the hay, how it looks, how it smells, etc. There can be much variation in hay from bale to bale from even the same pasture. A horse's stomach is designed to eat a good forage most of it's waking day.
  5. Gunshot Euthanasia

    I am sorry for your ordeal, but all horse people that have been in the business long, particularly out in a rural area has "been there, done that". There is nothing wrong with a gun shot to the head. To my way of thinking it is far more humane than waiting hours with an animal in agony or spending big money with a vet to get the same result with not a very quick or pleasant death as well. Life is, well, death. I just hope that I may have as quick a transition as your horse when the time comes. You did very well in my book. Again sorry,
  6. Gunshot Euthanasia

    I am sorry for your ordeal, but all horse people that have been in the business long, particularly out in a rural area has "been there, done that". There is nothing wrong with a gun shot to the head. To my way of thinking it is far more humane than waiting hours with an animal in agony or spending big money with a vet to get the same result with not a very quick or pleasant death as well. Life is, well, death. I just hope that I may have as quick a transition as your horse when the time comes. You did very well in my book. Again sorry,
  7. Mixing DMSO??

    I remember my first meeting with DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide), I was just hired on my first training job and had settled in California. I noticed this strange bottle of fluid called DMSO already in residence in that California tack room. My first introduction to DMSO and that was 1973. Now DMSO is pretty much a staple of any serious horse training barn and any sports medicine facility. Vets inject it, nasally spray it, and mix it with their conventional medications. Vets seem to accept DMSO far more readily for it therapeutic values than any other health professional. Trainers around the USA consider it indispensable. DMSO was first synthesized in 1866 by a Russian scientist. This substance was colorless, had a garlic odor, felt oily and looked like mineral oil in the test tube, and left an aftertaste similar to clams. This early scientist found that DMSO was an excellent solvent, great degreaser, paint thinner, and anti-freeze. For the next 80 years, DMSO was pretty much forgotten. After WWII, chemists were showing renewed interest in it as a solvent. It was found that DMSO could protect biological tissue from the damages of freezing. What really brought DMSO to public recognition was Dr. Jacob's early work with it as a kidney organ protector in freezing. He obtained samples of DMSO from the Zellerbach Paper Company, since it is commonly collected as a by-product of the paper making industry. It is derived from lignin, the cement substance of trees. He found that DMSO had a drying effect on skin making it useful in burn therapy. He found that painting it on his skin, he could taste it within seconds. Further studies by Jacob showed that DMSO not only passed through the skin membranes without damaging the tissue, but it also could carry a large number of substances with it, into the body. For example, Penicillin can be dissolved in DMSO and carried into the body. DMSO was shown to relieve pain, reduce swelling, exhibit anti-bacteria properties, improve blood supply, soften scar tissue, enhance other medicati ons, act as a diuretic, and have muscle relaxant qualities. The deceased governor, George Wallace, brought some publicity to DMSO in the early 1970s from his use of this compound for his pain experienced in a wheelchair. Later, in 1980, "60 Minutes" did a piece on DMSO which further popularized the mystic of DMSO. The FDA has stubbornly refused to recognize DMSO for human use except in a few isolated pathologies. Veterinarians can use it on horses for various ailments, but they are the exception in the eyes of the FDA. DMSO is curious in that it has a freezing point of 68 degrees F. The pure forms of DMSO will freeze at that temperature, but with the addition of more and more water, DMSO's freezing point will be lowered. This is a good test to know how pure your DMSO is. If it does not freeze in two hours in the refrigerator, it probably is diluted with water. Also, note that DMSO is highly hygroscopic. It pulls water out of the air and out of body tissue (hence, its drying effect). DMSO and water have a very strong chemical bond. This is the mechanism of how it moves through the live tissues by bonding with the water molecules. The immune system is stimulated into higher effectiveness by DMSO which allows macrophages to move around and through the tissues faster. DMSO diminishes allergic reactions. Many drugs dissolve in DMSO and retain their activity and properties while combined with DMSO. Often DMSO can strengthen and multiply the action of dissolved drugs. It has been found that many drugs can be used in smaller quantifies when applied in DMSO. As a penetrating carrier of drugs, DMSO is unsurpassed. It can easily carry pharmaceuticals to any part of the body in therapeutic dosages. It can penetrate endothelial coatings of the arterial walls, meninges of the brain, skin, mucous membranes, most all tissues. Intravenous and intramuscular injection of DMSO can pass it easily into the brain and spine. The blood/brain barrier is usually exempt to most drug therapy, not DMSO. It will pass through this impenetrable area. DMSO has been administered topically; injected under the skin, in the muscle and in the blood; given orally, intrathecally and by inhalation. I have used DMSO for a number of years as a menstrum for my herbal tinctures. It is the best replacement for ethanol, that I can think of. Not only will it extract the medicinal properties from your herb, but it will produce a tincture that will very efficiently transport those medicinal properties through the skin and GI tract equal to, if not better than ethanol. Horsemen primarily use DMSO topically. Many of you who have employed it will note that it does indeed dry the skin out. This usually happens only with concentrations at the higher levels. It usually is believed that optimal concentrations of DMSO varies from 50% to 90%. In human practice, 50% concentrations are routinely used around the face and neck. 70% concentrations are generally considered the usual concentrations in administration on the other areas of the skin. I think you will find that many vets tend to mix pure DMSO at higher concentrations and this will often cause scurfing or drying of the skin which is not really serious, but may disturb the uninformed owner. Here are 16 major therapeutic properties of DMSO: 1) It blocks pain by interrupting conduction of the small c-fibers, the nonmyelinated nerve fibers. 2) anti-inflammatory, 3) bacteriostatic, fungistatic, and virostatic, 4) transport therapeutic drugs across the membranes, 5) reduces platelet thrombi in blood vessels, 6) can reduce the workload on the heart, 7) tranquilizing properties, 8) enhances antifungal, antibacterial agents, 9) a vasodilator, 10) inhibits cholinesterase, 11) softens scar tissue, 12) scavenges hydroxyl free radicals, 13) stimulates immune system, 14) potent diuretic when administered IV, 15) stimulates interferon formation, 16) stimulates wound healing Doug
  8. Mixing DMSO??

    I remember my first meeting with DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide), I was just hired on my first training job and had settled in California. I noticed this strange bottle of fluid called DMSO already in residence in that California tack room. My first introduction to DMSO and that was 1973. Now DMSO is pretty much a staple of any serious horse training barn and any sports medicine facility. Vets inject it, nasally spray it, and mix it with their conventional medications. Vets seem to accept DMSO far more readily for it therapeutic values than any other health professional. Trainers around the USA consider it indispensable. DMSO was first synthesized in 1866 by a Russian scientist. This substance was colorless, had a garlic odor, felt oily and looked like mineral oil in the test tube, and left an aftertaste similar to clams. This early scientist found that DMSO was an excellent solvent, great degreaser, paint thinner, and anti-freeze. For the next 80 years, DMSO was pretty much forgotten. After WWII, chemists were showing renewed interest in it as a solvent. It was found that DMSO could protect biological tissue from the damages of freezing. What really brought DMSO to public recognition was Dr. Jacob's early work with it as a kidney organ protector in freezing. He obtained samples of DMSO from the Zellerbach Paper Company, since it is commonly collected as a by-product of the paper making industry. It is derived from lignin, the cement substance of trees. He found that DMSO had a drying effect on skin making it useful in burn therapy. He found that painting it on his skin, he could taste it within seconds. Further studies by Jacob showed that DMSO not only passed through the skin membranes without damaging the tissue, but it also could carry a large number of substances with it, into the body. For example, Penicillin can be dissolved in DMSO and carried into the body. DMSO was shown to relieve pain, reduce swelling, exhibit anti-bacteria properties, improve blood supply, soften scar tissue, enhance other medicati ons, act as a diuretic, and have muscle relaxant qualities. The deceased governor, George Wallace, brought some publicity to DMSO in the early 1970s from his use of this compound for his pain experienced in a wheelchair. Later, in 1980, "60 Minutes" did a piece on DMSO which further popularized the mystic of DMSO. The FDA has stubbornly refused to recognize DMSO for human use except in a few isolated pathologies. Veterinarians can use it on horses for various ailments, but they are the exception in the eyes of the FDA. DMSO is curious in that it has a freezing point of 68 degrees F. The pure forms of DMSO will freeze at that temperature, but with the addition of more and more water, DMSO's freezing point will be lowered. This is a good test to know how pure your DMSO is. If it does not freeze in two hours in the refrigerator, it probably is diluted with water. Also, note that DMSO is highly hygroscopic. It pulls water out of the air and out of body tissue (hence, its drying effect). DMSO and water have a very strong chemical bond. This is the mechanism of how it moves through the live tissues by bonding with the water molecules. The immune system is stimulated into higher effectiveness by DMSO which allows macrophages to move around and through the tissues faster. DMSO diminishes allergic reactions. Many drugs dissolve in DMSO and retain their activity and properties while combined with DMSO. Often DMSO can strengthen and multiply the action of dissolved drugs. It has been found that many drugs can be used in smaller quantifies when applied in DMSO. As a penetrating carrier of drugs, DMSO is unsurpassed. It can easily carry pharmaceuticals to any part of the body in therapeutic dosages. It can penetrate endothelial coatings of the arterial walls, meninges of the brain, skin, mucous membranes, most all tissues. Intravenous and intramuscular injection of DMSO can pass it easily into the brain and spine. The blood/brain barrier is usually exempt to most drug therapy, not DMSO. It will pass through this impenetrable area. DMSO has been administered topically; injected under the skin, in the muscle and in the blood; given orally, intrathecally and by inhalation. I have used DMSO for a number of years as a menstrum for my herbal tinctures. It is the best replacement for ethanol, that I can think of. Not only will it extract the medicinal properties from your herb, but it will produce a tincture that will very efficiently transport those medicinal properties through the skin and GI tract equal to, if not better than ethanol. Horsemen primarily use DMSO topically. Many of you who have employed it will note that it does indeed dry the skin out. This usually happens only with concentrations at the higher levels. It usually is believed that optimal concentrations of DMSO varies from 50% to 90%. In human practice, 50% concentrations are routinely used around the face and neck. 70% concentrations are generally considered the usual concentrations in administration on the other areas of the skin. I think you will find that many vets tend to mix pure DMSO at higher concentrations and this will often cause scurfing or drying of the skin which is not really serious, but may disturb the uninformed owner. Here are 16 major therapeutic properties of DMSO: 1) It blocks pain by interrupting conduction of the small c-fibers, the nonmyelinated nerve fibers. 2) anti-inflammatory, 3) bacteriostatic, fungistatic, and virostatic, 4) transport therapeutic drugs across the membranes, 5) reduces platelet thrombi in blood vessels, 6) can reduce the workload on the heart, 7) tranquilizing properties, 8) enhances antifungal, antibacterial agents, 9) a vasodilator, 10) inhibits cholinesterase, 11) softens scar tissue, 12) scavenges hydroxyl free radicals, 13) stimulates immune system, 14) potent diuretic when administered IV, 15) stimulates interferon formation, 16) stimulates wound healing Doug
  9. Note many so-called poisonous herbs are actually medicinal for the horse in the correct amount. "What is there that is not poison? All things are poison and nothing is without poison. Solely the dose determines that a thing is not a poison." Paracelsus (1493-1541)
  10. Note many so-called poisonous herbs are actually medicinal for the horse in the correct amount. "What is there that is not poison? All things are poison and nothing is without poison. Solely the dose determines that a thing is not a poison." Paracelsus (1493-1541)
  11. supplement for allergies

    AMEN to MSM! It is a little known fact that MSM will do wonders for many allergies. If it weren't for MSM, my ragweed allergy would be most uncomfortable this time of the year (Aug to frost). I have also used it on my scottie's skin allergy to superb results. Try it.
  12. supplement for allergies

    AMEN to MSM! It is a little known fact that MSM will do wonders for many allergies. If it weren't for MSM, my ragweed allergy would be most uncomfortable this time of the year (Aug to frost). I have also used it on my scottie's skin allergy to superb results. Try it.
  13. ALLERGIES!!!

    Look into feeding her MSM. It is little known that this commonly fed suppliment for muscles and joints is also excellent for allergies. It has relieved my hay fever, ragweed pollen allergy tremendously in the late summer! It has kept my scottish terrier skin allergy very much under control. Just remember dosages requirments can vary. You need to experiement with dosage levels.
  14. ALLERGIES!!!

    Look into feeding her MSM. It is little known that this commonly fed suppliment for muscles and joints is also excellent for allergies. It has relieved my hay fever, ragweed pollen allergy tremendously in the late summer! It has kept my scottish terrier skin allergy very much under control. Just remember dosages requirments can vary. You need to experiement with dosage levels.
  15. How often should DMSO be applied?

    DMSO is very versatile and can be applied topically, ingested, injected, nebulized, etc. I have been using it since the mid 1970s with superb success throughout the years. In a perfect world, 3 or 4 times a day would be good. Note, that you may want to dilute the 99% pure stuff that can be bought at the tack stores in half to 50% to minimize hygroscopic (water absorbing, i.e. drying) characteristics some times seen on the skin. I mostly applied the 99% stuff and didnt worry about the drying of the skin, but to each his/her own. DMSO is good to make your own herbal medicines with. If you have access to comfrey or other healing herbs, simply place chopped up herb in a mason jar, add DMSO to just above the herb, and let it stand in a warm dark place, covered for 2 weeks. Strain and bottle in dark glass. You now have a superb healing preparation! Paint the hock with it. Comfrey (boneknit), solomon's seal, and other herbs would be an excellent choice. You might also want to look into various counter-irritant leg and hock paints, i.e. Ball's solution. These are very commonly used in the race horse business.