desert rider

Members
  • Content count

    395
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

About desert rider

  • Rank
    Newbie

Contact Methods

  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Location
    arizona
  1. Genders of horses and intelligence.

    I've dealt with all genders and agree with everyone that the stereotype really doesn't fit every horse. I've owned two mares and like Bluesma said once you win them over they'll give you their heart. Most people, in my opinion, don't want to take the time to win them over and that's where they run into problems with their mares. I've also owned three geldings and only one fit the "dumb" stereotype. He's as willing as anything, but just doesn't seem to have that extra "heart" that my mares do/did. The other two were smart and probably the most conniving, playful, funny horses I've ever run across. I've dealt with a few young stallions and they are chalk full of personality and intelligence and provided you aren't trying to force them to do anything and they understand what it is you want them to do, they seemed to be willing enough to give it a try. Of course all of this is only in my experience and there's no way I could speak for every horse out there.
  2. Building Weight

    When I got my OTTB she was skinny. Not boney, but still a little too thin. I tried giving her more hay, but it didn't work. I ended up switching over to pellets that I could weigh easier. She eats 24 lbs of food a day, 12 at each feeding and is doing great now. She'll probably always be a little on the slim side, but at least you can't see her ribs anymore!
  3. Building Weight

    When I got my OTTB she was skinny. Not boney, but still a little too thin. I tried giving her more hay, but it didn't work. I ended up switching over to pellets that I could weigh easier. She eats 24 lbs of food a day, 12 at each feeding and is doing great now. She'll probably always be a little on the slim side, but at least you can't see her ribs anymore!
  4. Going Barefoot

    Out where we live the ground is like concrete with rocks mixed in. I've tried my mare barefoot and it just didn't work. She's an OTTB too and has the typical, how was it put?..."big flared, stretched WL, weak, paddle, cracked, flat, TB feet". I think if it was possible for her to be on softer ground she would do much better. As it is, she's doing OK in just front shoes. Barefoot is the natural way to go of course, but the combination of a foot that has had most of it's natural strength bred out of it and less than ideal ground was just too much for her to handle.
  5. Find a qualified person that comes highly recommended and invest in some lessons rather than books. Books are a great reference, but they can only take you so far. The best teacher is experience and having a good instructor there to help you along while you're in the saddle can be invaluable. Good luck on you're journey!
  6. Cheap foals at auction

    I tend to agree with you. If someone is willing to let a foal go for so little then it is obviously not a foal that they believe is worth keeping. Whether it didn't turn out how they expected or it was an accidental breeding or whatever their reason is, it boils down to the fact that you're not going to see the top quality foals from conscientious(sp) breeders going for $35.
  7. Taxidermied Animal Butts

    Where do you guys find this stuff???
  8. fun game to play

    Hard to play on a keyboard...not like when I was a kid. Did I just age myself?
  9. How to teach neck rening???

    Well first I make sure the horse fully understands plow reining before I even attempt neck reining. After I'm sure the horse is confident plow reining then I'll give the cue to turn one way or another; of course the horse isn't going to understand what I'm asking, so I'll follow that cue with the direct rein to turn in the same direction. I'll repeat this process over and over and over and over and with patience and alot of praise the horse will eventually put 2 and 2 together and understand that when the rein is placed on the side of it's neck it's supposed to turn away from it. This doesn't happen in one day of course, just like anything else it takes time and consistency.
  10. How to teach neck rening???

    Well first I make sure the horse fully understands plow reining before I even attempt neck reining. After I'm sure the horse is confident plow reining then I'll give the cue to turn one way or another; of course the horse isn't going to understand what I'm asking, so I'll follow that cue with the direct rein to turn in the same direction. I'll repeat this process over and over and over and over and with patience and alot of praise the horse will eventually put 2 and 2 together and understand that when the rein is placed on the side of it's neck it's supposed to turn away from it. This doesn't happen in one day of course, just like anything else it takes time and consistency.
  11. which is better?

    I agree with chester. If your horse normally doesn't wear shoes and it has good strong feet then I wouldn't worry about putting shoes on. They have better traction on the street without shoes anyway, unless you put the glue on rubber ones on them. If you decide to put shoes on for the parade then I would take them right back off afterward so her feet can remain in their most natural state.
  12. clipping

    I really think it's kind of personal preference. I leave it up to my horses. They both LOVE to have their whiskers trimmed! They're goofy critters following me around asking to have their whiskers trimmed. I think they like the vibration against their sensitive nose, they also like the praise they get when they stand still to have it done. I don't even have to tie them up! lol, they make me laugh
  13. Do you give your horse the winter off?

    Nope, don't give them the winter off, but do give them the summer off...110 in the shade is too much for me! I think in the cases of extreme weather, be it hot or cold, having some time off is beneficial for both human and animal. Just my opinion
  14. Do you give your horse the winter off?

    Nope, don't give them the winter off, but do give them the summer off...110 in the shade is too much for me! I think in the cases of extreme weather, be it hot or cold, having some time off is beneficial for both human and animal. Just my opinion
  15. Stalling a Horse 24-7: Cruel? Or Not?

    I agree with everyone else. Horses are social animals, meant to live in groups where they can run and roam as they please. I don't even have stalls for my horses. Granted, I only have 2 horses but they're free to roam around their 1/3 acre as they please. I live in AZ so I don't have to worry about excessive cold or rain, just excessive heat and for that they have a shade.