Jonergin

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About Jonergin

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  • Birthday 10/07/1983

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  • Gender
    Female
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    Sierra Vista, AZ
  1. Alright, so here?s what happened this morning. After much discussion between the farrier, facility owner (who?s been on the property for 15 years) and I this is what we've decided: Well, first let me preface our decision with a statement ? I do believe that a barefoot horse is a happy and healthier horse. With a total program that involves the whole horse (feed, regular hoof maintenance, exercise, ect) many ?problem? hooves can be restored to their natural state to the benefit of the horse. Now to the decision: While I someday would hope that I can get to where I can do this for my horse, right now I do not have the ability to manage and maintain her as a barefoot horse. I wont be giving excuses or ?reasons? for this other than I am unable. This would be a different decision if she were housed on my own property. So, as it stands, I?m maintaining her with shoes on. Please don?t chew me up on this. Missyclare, I especially respect your opinion and advice. You have the ability to write as if you were in the horse?s mind and that really opened my eyes. Please don?t think that I?ve discredited/ignored you for keeping her shoed. I hear you and I am putting into place what you?ve said one piece at a time (as best I can). As far as the vet and the farrier say... she is perfectly ride-able. The farrier was very impressed on her hoof growth on all four hooves as they are all taking a more "upright" angle to the toe - though not as drastic as the injured one. Both of them surmise that she most likely struck the coronary band while loading in the trailer or knocking it on the edge of something hard. This produced a ridge similar to what happens when we stub our toes behind the quick. The ridge was weak and split open (this would have been the first stage of the crack when it was small). After that as it grew out and more torque was applied water managed to get into it more often and soften the underlying tissues and cause expansion. Anyone who's lived in Arizona knows how monsoon season is-- very very wet spells followed by dry spells over and over again. All of this combined to get us what we had here. As far as the ferrier is concerned he says that her hoof may be ugly when that left over part sheds off but it'll be healthy. If she gets sore when it does come off then we'll pull the shoe and boot her. I'm having major issues imbedding these pics... so I put them in an album. Hopefully you all can get it to work for you. Kreole's Hoof Album The order goes as such: After shoes were removed, Lateral Outside After shoes were removed, Lateral Inside After shoes were removed, Solar (looks like she's got a bit of Thrush too, lovely...) After Initial Trim, Lateral Outside (sorry, couldn't get a lateral inside shot) After Initial Trim, Solar Cleaning up the crack and the dead tissue behind it Up close and personal Finished up, Lateral Outside Finished up, Lateral Inside
  2. I can get those pics today after we pull that shoe (which I think will be happening). Right now I'm festering at work, waiting to get off. So it'll be a few more hours. She was due to be re-shod this week, so that makes us 6 weeks from her last trim. Thank you for the Gold-Bond tip! [Not Worthy] As for the question of her diet. My orig. post would have been twice as long had I gone into that. Lol. I'm sure most of you know how bad the drought was in KY this last fall which resulted in MANY many "free horses" come early winter. My horse suffered on the poor quality grass hey even when supplemented with oats, grain, Weightbuilder and Equimin. She ended up going from a "fluffy" 1206lbs at her largest in the spring down to just over 1060lbs when she arrived here in AZ. If it hadn't been my mom trying her best to keep weight on her I would have crucified anyone else for that much weight loss. So when she arrived here we started her on good quality grass hay (6 flk/day), rolled oats (3 lbs/2xday) and timothy/bermuda pellets (3 lbs/2xday). Plus Equimin (I dropped off on the Weightbuilder because I'm convinced it doesn't work). Oh, just an FYI in case someone asks, she cannot eat alfalfa. She gets bad indigestion with the "queasy" face to go with it. She's slowly putting on weight and is around 1115ish now, still a little skinny to me. I'd probably be happy with another 30 pounds of muscle. I'm working on getting my hands on a hoof supplement made for the horses in this area to go with the hay we feed. As with most horses, a drastic change in feed will result in a change in hoof appearance as it grows out, I have noticed that the hoof that is growing in now (approx 1/3 of the hoof) looks and feels much better than the old "drought" hooves. Sorry if I'm long winded but I like to cover all bases if possible. Does anyone have an opinion on whether the Boa boot or the Epic would be better for this case?
  3. I've got an 8/yo TB mare that I've recently moved from the KY Bluegrass area to Southern Arizona. When she arrived (in April) she had a horizontal crack approx 4cm long (wide) about 1cm down from the coronary band on her left rear hoof. At this time she had been successfully barefoot for almost a year. I monitored her hoof condition and the crack for the first 3 weeks and decided that because of the VERY hard dry ground out here that she needed to be shod. I applied moisturizer infrequently and noted no changes in the crack and she never showed any pain or irritation. Here's where I kick myself in the butt. [Duh] I couldn't go out to where she is boarded for nearly 3 weeks. When I went out this last Friday I noticed that the crack had morphed. Now it was about 8cm long (wide) and drooping in the center with a 3-5 mm gap. I cleaned her hoof thoroughly and did some poking and prodding. She showed no sensitivity. I took her to the round pen and on a short ride to test it at the walk, trot and canter. I noted no change in stride length, difference in locomotion or feeling (for me) at any gait. The next day I repeated the same with the same results. Tuesday morning I got a call from the facility owner saying that I needed to come see her hoof as it had once again morphed. This time I have pics, see attachments. The tape in the pics is measuring from 20cm to 30cm (so 10cm in total). Wednesday morning I have the farrier coming out to have a look at what he can do. I have not spoken to him personally but the facility owner suggested that he may try to file and "staple" it. I've never seen this so I'm highly skeptical. I have seen the use of epoxy but that was never mentioned. I did take the time to send the above pics and a video to my vet back home who suggested careful trimming and an Easyboot. Here is my question: The Easyboot website says not to leave the boot on for more than 24 hours. If my aim is to protect that hoof so as not to lose the dead portion... when do I take it off and for how long?? Also, since I obviously wont be riding her, I was thinking of using the Boa boot. Any suggestions for that specific boot or for the use of a different style would be appreciated. Thanks a bunch all. Kreole_Hoof.zip
  4. Babysteps for the Herdbound

    I'm in tears as I write this today. While I wait for Kreole's old owner to return from her vacation I thought I would get started on a bit of groundwork in the roundpen. I chose to free lunge her without tack and work on changing directions and stopping. She's your typical tense TB when you start lungeing so I wanted to work on slow, relaxed turns. We were doing great, she was at the point of listening to my vocal and body language cues. Now, I don't want to blame anyone here.. but our other horse was for some strange reason (this is never done) taken out of the barn and up to the top pasture. I swear we were 10 seconds from ending the session. She started running figure eights towards the gate. I didn't want her doing that because I wasn't sure if she would panic and try to jump it. I asked her to move off at a trot, got three nice cirlces and asked her to slow to a walk. She did. I then made a quarter turn, put my whip in my other hand pointed it half way across the circle from her, pointed my guiding hand in the way I wanted her to turn and asked for it. Instead she charged past my whip and threw herself into the gate of the roundpen. She got one leg stuck in the poles and smashed her back legs into the lower poles. She nearly fell over backwards. She freed herself and took off going around the pen in a panic. I had dropped my whip by then and was calmly calling to her, putting my hands out in treat fashion to try to get her to come to me. She had cuts and an obvious limp on her left front leg. She wouldn't come. I went into a passive stance, hands limp at my sides, head down. Nothing. I sat down on the ground and made myself little to try and get her curiousity. Nope. Finally I left the round pen thinking that maybe if I just let her calm down a minute that I could try again to catch her. That worked. When I came back she came to me with her head down. I washed her up, gave her some bute, gave her a linament rinse and tended her wounds. 3 legs are cut, but luckily not too deep. I walked her out till she was dry and her limp went away. I called our vet to tell her what had happened and describe her wounds. She said not to worry too much but keep an eye on her front leg. This is so disheartening. I'm trying so hard. I spend tons of time with her just talking and scratching her itches. I've tried to draw the line with her on being pushy and when she's not worried about the other horse she acts like an angel. I tried to take it back to the basics and she tries to kill herself. Please, I need a bit of encouragement to hold me over till her old mom comes back.
  5. Babysteps for the Herdbound

    I'm in tears as I write this today. While I wait for Kreole's old owner to return from her vacation I thought I would get started on a bit of groundwork in the roundpen. I chose to free lunge her without tack and work on changing directions and stopping. She's your typical tense TB when you start lungeing so I wanted to work on slow, relaxed turns. We were doing great, she was at the point of listening to my vocal and body language cues. Now, I don't want to blame anyone here.. but our other horse was for some strange reason (this is never done) taken out of the barn and up to the top pasture. I swear we were 10 seconds from ending the session. She started running figure eights towards the gate. I didn't want her doing that because I wasn't sure if she would panic and try to jump it. I asked her to move off at a trot, got three nice cirlces and asked her to slow to a walk. She did. I then made a quarter turn, put my whip in my other hand pointed it half way across the circle from her, pointed my guiding hand in the way I wanted her to turn and asked for it. Instead she charged past my whip and threw herself into the gate of the roundpen. She got one leg stuck in the poles and smashed her back legs into the lower poles. She nearly fell over backwards. She freed herself and took off going around the pen in a panic. I had dropped my whip by then and was calmly calling to her, putting my hands out in treat fashion to try to get her to come to me. She had cuts and an obvious limp on her left front leg. She wouldn't come. I went into a passive stance, hands limp at my sides, head down. Nothing. I sat down on the ground and made myself little to try and get her curiousity. Nope. Finally I left the round pen thinking that maybe if I just let her calm down a minute that I could try again to catch her. That worked. When I came back she came to me with her head down. I washed her up, gave her some bute, gave her a linament rinse and tended her wounds. 3 legs are cut, but luckily not too deep. I walked her out till she was dry and her limp went away. I called our vet to tell her what had happened and describe her wounds. She said not to worry too much but keep an eye on her front leg. This is so disheartening. I'm trying so hard. I spend tons of time with her just talking and scratching her itches. I've tried to draw the line with her on being pushy and when she's not worried about the other horse she acts like an angel. I tried to take it back to the basics and she tries to kill herself. Please, I need a bit of encouragement to hold me over till her old mom comes back.
  6. Babysteps for the Herdbound

    Ok phew. I'm glad that you both said what you did to me. I was thinking that to myself but needed the nudge to make the bubble burst. Didn't mean to scare you all with my "stupid stick"! Its just a dressage whip that I use to ask her to move her hips or back up with. I'm very gentle with it, I assure you. Think Handy Stick ala Clinton Anderson. I'm glad to say I do have his groundwork dvds. I just hadn't thought she needed them previously. Obviously I was very wrong. I helped train my mom's younger OTTB (ironicly Kreole's half brother) with Clinton's method two years ago. I guess its time to pull them out and jog my memory. I did make, yet another, change tonight. I put her back into all the tack she had been riding in for the last few years. Twisted snaffle with a loose running martingale. I loose lunged her in our round pen to give her a chance to take stock of what was different. Afterwards I rode her around the round pen (just for safety, it was getting dark) for about 30 minutes. I can't say there was a drastic change but she didn't get silly either. She did her usual shuffling and worrying in the crossties but I worked with her till she stood nicely with her head low and relaxed. I then took her out in halter to cool her out, I made sure I took as many chances as I could to get her out of sight of our other horse. She did ok, a little pushy at times but never lost her head. I'm going to take her old owner up on her offer to come work out any problems that developed. With Kreole's TB stamina I think working her till she gives up could quite possibly take every rider I know... (LOL) Thanks for the advise so far. Please give more if you think of it. I'll keep you all updated.
  7. Babysteps for the Herdbound

    Ok phew. I'm glad that you both said what you did to me. I was thinking that to myself but needed the nudge to make the bubble burst. Didn't mean to scare you all with my "stupid stick"! Its just a dressage whip that I use to ask her to move her hips or back up with. I'm very gentle with it, I assure you. Think Handy Stick ala Clinton Anderson. I'm glad to say I do have his groundwork dvds. I just hadn't thought she needed them previously. Obviously I was very wrong. I helped train my mom's younger OTTB (ironicly Kreole's half brother) with Clinton's method two years ago. I guess its time to pull them out and jog my memory. I did make, yet another, change tonight. I put her back into all the tack she had been riding in for the last few years. Twisted snaffle with a loose running martingale. I loose lunged her in our round pen to give her a chance to take stock of what was different. Afterwards I rode her around the round pen (just for safety, it was getting dark) for about 30 minutes. I can't say there was a drastic change but she didn't get silly either. She did her usual shuffling and worrying in the crossties but I worked with her till she stood nicely with her head low and relaxed. I then took her out in halter to cool her out, I made sure I took as many chances as I could to get her out of sight of our other horse. She did ok, a little pushy at times but never lost her head. I'm going to take her old owner up on her offer to come work out any problems that developed. With Kreole's TB stamina I think working her till she gives up could quite possibly take every rider I know... (LOL) Thanks for the advise so far. Please give more if you think of it. I'll keep you all updated.
  8. Babysteps for the Herdbound

    I've had Kreole, my 9 y/o OTTB, for a little over a month and in that time she's becoming more and more herdbound. When I test-rode her she walked happily out of the herd, tacked up and never had an issue with anything I asked her to do. The day after I brought her home I took her out solo for a 2 mile trail ride. Not a problem. We'd been working daily in my dressage ring, sometimes with our other horse around, sometimes not. She'd been paying attention to me, her only distraction was the herd of cows across the street. She would stop short and stare for a few seconds and then go back to work. So far it seemed like she and I were building a good rapport. Here is where I think I lost my "good leader" position that we were developing. I had to change her out of the bit that she'd been using in the hunter/jumper arena before I got her. She had been showed extensively in a slow twist snaffle. Dressage rules say no way so I changed to just an eggbutt french link. Soon after that she figured out that she could take off at a race-track run and get somewhere before I could get enough leverage to stop her. She never managed to throw me but there were two times that I rode her neck for a few feet before getting my rear back in the saddle. Very embarrassing. After that she started getting upset in the crossties when our other horse would leave the barn. At first I would just put her back where I had left her if she moved. Then it got to the point where she would stand nicely while I watched but if I turned my back she would throw her head down in the crossties and then run forward. So I got out the "stupid stick" and would give her a little tap when she started swinging her butt around or pushing forward. If she stood quietly for a good few seconds I would give her a treat. I thought we had got over it when she stopped her antics. Now the fun part. We brought my niece's Appy over in prep for the local saddle club show. They'd never met but they seemed to form a quick acceptance of each other. We kept him in a seperate paddock but at night we spotted them grooming each other over the fence. The Appy had a bit of a problem leaving Kreole's side and soon after she started getting the same way. I tried working them seperate but with only having one riding arena it gets a little hard. 4 days into their friendship we took them to the show. The Appy did fine, groomed and tacked up without a hitch. Kreole did fine until the Appy left for its first class. She threw an absolute fit and continued to do so for the entire 4 hour show. Strangely enough, she behaved like a good show horse when we were in the ring. When brought back to the trailer she would flip out again. She banged her face on the trailer, her legs on the trailer and by the time we tried to load her up again she had traumatized herself enough that she wouldn't load at all. We had to get someone else to load her in their trailer and drop her off at my house. That night I doctored her bumps and bangs, gave her some bute for the pain. The whole time she was by herself in the barn with me and she was ok. She sought her comfort in me by nuzzling me, talking to me and just wanting to be near me. I thought we were going to be ok. I gave her a few days off because she was obviously sore from the tenseness of stress and banging herself around. A few days ago I went out to ride her with my mom on her horse, everything was fine until my mom decided she was done. Kreole and I had just got warmed up so I kept on riding. She could see the other horse and kept calling to him. I would give her a little bump and try to get her attention back on me. I kept trying and when she would come back to me I would just let her walk on a nice relaxed rein. Then she decided she'd had enough and starting screaming, rearing, spinning and trying to lunge into her race-track run. I disengaged the hindquarters, did circles and the like but never managed to get her attention back on me. She actually started sounding like a leaking balloon. She would hit that first note of a whinney and then hold it for nearly a minute. I set my goal on just getting a few steps of a controlled walk out of her before heading back. It took me another 5 minutes of her dancing, rearing and screaming to get it. Then we faced the barn and headed back, I fought her for a walk the entire route. Today I brought her in for some fly spray and she had a hissy fit in the cross ties because the other horse left the barn when he realized I wasn't going to feed him. I brought out the "stupid stick" again and managed to get her to act a bit less crazed before I finished up spraying and let her back out. Sorry for such a long post but I feel its sort of complicated. I just want to know if I'm doing things right or just screwing her up more. She's a good horse, comes when called and leaves the company of the other horse to be with me where ever I go. I'm not scared of her when she freaks out but its hard to get anywhere with re-training when she wont concentrate on what I'm doing. Thanks all.
  9. Babysteps for the Herdbound

    I've had Kreole, my 9 y/o OTTB, for a little over a month and in that time she's becoming more and more herdbound. When I test-rode her she walked happily out of the herd, tacked up and never had an issue with anything I asked her to do. The day after I brought her home I took her out solo for a 2 mile trail ride. Not a problem. We'd been working daily in my dressage ring, sometimes with our other horse around, sometimes not. She'd been paying attention to me, her only distraction was the herd of cows across the street. She would stop short and stare for a few seconds and then go back to work. So far it seemed like she and I were building a good rapport. Here is where I think I lost my "good leader" position that we were developing. I had to change her out of the bit that she'd been using in the hunter/jumper arena before I got her. She had been showed extensively in a slow twist snaffle. Dressage rules say no way so I changed to just an eggbutt french link. Soon after that she figured out that she could take off at a race-track run and get somewhere before I could get enough leverage to stop her. She never managed to throw me but there were two times that I rode her neck for a few feet before getting my rear back in the saddle. Very embarrassing. After that she started getting upset in the crossties when our other horse would leave the barn. At first I would just put her back where I had left her if she moved. Then it got to the point where she would stand nicely while I watched but if I turned my back she would throw her head down in the crossties and then run forward. So I got out the "stupid stick" and would give her a little tap when she started swinging her butt around or pushing forward. If she stood quietly for a good few seconds I would give her a treat. I thought we had got over it when she stopped her antics. Now the fun part. We brought my niece's Appy over in prep for the local saddle club show. They'd never met but they seemed to form a quick acceptance of each other. We kept him in a seperate paddock but at night we spotted them grooming each other over the fence. The Appy had a bit of a problem leaving Kreole's side and soon after she started getting the same way. I tried working them seperate but with only having one riding arena it gets a little hard. 4 days into their friendship we took them to the show. The Appy did fine, groomed and tacked up without a hitch. Kreole did fine until the Appy left for its first class. She threw an absolute fit and continued to do so for the entire 4 hour show. Strangely enough, she behaved like a good show horse when we were in the ring. When brought back to the trailer she would flip out again. She banged her face on the trailer, her legs on the trailer and by the time we tried to load her up again she had traumatized herself enough that she wouldn't load at all. We had to get someone else to load her in their trailer and drop her off at my house. That night I doctored her bumps and bangs, gave her some bute for the pain. The whole time she was by herself in the barn with me and she was ok. She sought her comfort in me by nuzzling me, talking to me and just wanting to be near me. I thought we were going to be ok. I gave her a few days off because she was obviously sore from the tenseness of stress and banging herself around. A few days ago I went out to ride her with my mom on her horse, everything was fine until my mom decided she was done. Kreole and I had just got warmed up so I kept on riding. She could see the other horse and kept calling to him. I would give her a little bump and try to get her attention back on me. I kept trying and when she would come back to me I would just let her walk on a nice relaxed rein. Then she decided she'd had enough and starting screaming, rearing, spinning and trying to lunge into her race-track run. I disengaged the hindquarters, did circles and the like but never managed to get her attention back on me. She actually started sounding like a leaking balloon. She would hit that first note of a whinney and then hold it for nearly a minute. I set my goal on just getting a few steps of a controlled walk out of her before heading back. It took me another 5 minutes of her dancing, rearing and screaming to get it. Then we faced the barn and headed back, I fought her for a walk the entire route. Today I brought her in for some fly spray and she had a hissy fit in the cross ties because the other horse left the barn when he realized I wasn't going to feed him. I brought out the "stupid stick" again and managed to get her to act a bit less crazed before I finished up spraying and let her back out. Sorry for such a long post but I feel its sort of complicated. I just want to know if I'm doing things right or just screwing her up more. She's a good horse, comes when called and leaves the company of the other horse to be with me where ever I go. I'm not scared of her when she freaks out but its hard to get anywhere with re-training when she wont concentrate on what I'm doing. Thanks all.
  10. Hmm... bad habits? Me? Teehee... 1. Crossing under the neck when tied. 2. Not using a halter at all when grooming/tacking up. 3. Using my mom's old Arab as a back rest when he's lying in the field. (He loves it, I tickle his belly for him.) 4. I never wear a helmet anymore. 5. Using my mom's off-the-track TB to try and herd my neices escaped goats. Stupid moments. I've got some good ones. I used to work horses on a large ranch. In the summer it would get up to 115 degrees. The lead mare would always be as far as possible from the arena. I would walk out to get her with nothing, hop on bareback and use her fly mask to control her. BAD IDEA! I had been doing it for months without any incedent. Then one day she and the whole herd (30+ horses) took off. Luckily I was able to safely bail out, but I never did that again. When I was really young, and knew NOTHING about horses other than rented trail rides, I found a small herd in a field behind an appt complex. I would feed them baby carrots every day. One day I led the calmest one up to a rock and hopped on. Luckily she just walked a bit and then used a tree branch to wipe me off. That could have been bad, it was a really steep, hilly area and with big rocks all over the place. Same horses: One day I ran out of carrots and the lead gelding decided to get revenge on me. I was walking away and I heard hoofbeats behind me. I glanced to see him thundering up to me, I turned to run but he caught me in the back with a huge nose shove. I went flying (I only weighted like 70 pounds). When I rolled over he was on top of me, pawing me, nipping my shoulders and eating my hair. I put my feet between his front legs when he started to lay down on me. Funny thing is, had I known anything I would have wacked him in the nose and it would have probaby been over. I was on the ground for probably 30 minutes, no one would have ever seen me. The only reason I got away from him is the calm mare (the one I rode) distracted him with a squeal and I slipped behind a tree. Hope you enjoyed me stupid moments from my early teens. My only recent one was when my mom got her TB. I wanted to see how fast he really was.... so I shortened up the stirrups so create a jockey-like seat and let him rip. Bad bad bad... he nearly threw me when he decided to take a sudden right turn between the compost area and the barn. My center of balance was so high I would have flown like an arrow from a bow had I not hugged onto his neck in time. That's all I've got.
  11. Hmm... bad habits? Me? Teehee... 1. Crossing under the neck when tied. 2. Not using a halter at all when grooming/tacking up. 3. Using my mom's old Arab as a back rest when he's lying in the field. (He loves it, I tickle his belly for him.) 4. I never wear a helmet anymore. 5. Using my mom's off-the-track TB to try and herd my neices escaped goats. Stupid moments. I've got some good ones. I used to work horses on a large ranch. In the summer it would get up to 115 degrees. The lead mare would always be as far as possible from the arena. I would walk out to get her with nothing, hop on bareback and use her fly mask to control her. BAD IDEA! I had been doing it for months without any incedent. Then one day she and the whole herd (30+ horses) took off. Luckily I was able to safely bail out, but I never did that again. When I was really young, and knew NOTHING about horses other than rented trail rides, I found a small herd in a field behind an appt complex. I would feed them baby carrots every day. One day I led the calmest one up to a rock and hopped on. Luckily she just walked a bit and then used a tree branch to wipe me off. That could have been bad, it was a really steep, hilly area and with big rocks all over the place. Same horses: One day I ran out of carrots and the lead gelding decided to get revenge on me. I was walking away and I heard hoofbeats behind me. I glanced to see him thundering up to me, I turned to run but he caught me in the back with a huge nose shove. I went flying (I only weighted like 70 pounds). When I rolled over he was on top of me, pawing me, nipping my shoulders and eating my hair. I put my feet between his front legs when he started to lay down on me. Funny thing is, had I known anything I would have wacked him in the nose and it would have probaby been over. I was on the ground for probably 30 minutes, no one would have ever seen me. The only reason I got away from him is the calm mare (the one I rode) distracted him with a squeal and I slipped behind a tree. Hope you enjoyed me stupid moments from my early teens. My only recent one was when my mom got her TB. I wanted to see how fast he really was.... so I shortened up the stirrups so create a jockey-like seat and let him rip. Bad bad bad... he nearly threw me when he decided to take a sudden right turn between the compost area and the barn. My center of balance was so high I would have flown like an arrow from a bow had I not hugged onto his neck in time. That's all I've got.
  12. You'll be speachless!

    Hey all, just thought I would show you all a video that I found tonight. It's a truly amazing demonstration of horsemanship. If you haven't seen it already be prepared to have tears in your eyes.
  13. Your Opinions on stock breeds doing dressage

    I agree with everyone else, you shouldn't have any problems, especially at the lower levels. Back when I first started I went to the regional championships (in Cali) with a glowing 19 y/old Buckskin. She was the only Buckskin on the grounds during the three day event. To tell you the truth, I think because she stuck out so much she helped the judges remember me for the three days. I did really good on the equitation the first day, ok the second day and really cruddy the third day but I still took home Regional Champ for Intro level. Don't think twice about entering any color or type of horse, its all about how you and the horse work as a team to produce a solid ride.
  14. New horse?

    I can see his little mind working in that expression. Occasionally he looks a bit behind the verticle and tense. I'm wondering if you encourage more forward action out of him if he'll stretch into your hands more or if he'll get all bunched up... He really looks like a fun mount and what a cutie pie.