amy.luxford

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Everything posted by amy.luxford

  1. I'm in two minds at the moment, trying to decide between horses. I'm currently looking at three choices: 1 - The Unbroke 5yo Mare 2- A well-started 6yo QH Gelding, beginning cutting training, done some barrels 3 - Going to the sales and getting a project pony. Friends have come back from local sales around my area, and told me all about some really nice QH, QH/X's going through that are started, and ready to go. But no-one in the area wants a nice cow horse, or WP prospect or anything that has to do with the good ole' Quarter Horse Breed Now that I'm on my own property with loads of space, I feel kind of bad because FatLola is all on her lonesome, just cruising by the apple tree every afternoon to see if any have fallen down. And I've been looking at getting another horse, because I want to do different things. I'd really like to get some confidence jumping and start Hunter/Jumper, or go up the other end of the pool and start to learn some rodeo events other than Barrels. When I say "confidence jumping", I can jump 60cm tops, and after that, Lola just plateaus and its a put off to me. I've taken her out to a few training day showjumping things that my old Pony Club ran, and she dumped me so many times, threw all the dirt out - and lets not even get started on the hickstead! But put her in a dressage ring (which we've given a rest for now), or in a speed event - and she's a completely different horse! I rehabbed Lola successfully (bought from the sales as a skinny greenie) with the help of an instructor just to help me iron out the major glitches, along with an OTTB and another barely-started grade gelding. The geldings have gone onto other homes. Option one is halter broke, and a registered QH broody. I've completely gone off the idea of breeding - so the broody part doesn't appeal to me in the slightest - and to me, its just as rewarding to take a blank slate and do something with it. There's a fabulous western breaker about an hour from me, who charges a good rate and I'm yet to hear a bad thing about his methods. I've been up to see his stables - all the horses are in good condition, happy, healthy and the facilities are immaculate. I like the 5yo mare; she's got a sweet disposition and no big stick-out conformation faults - I like her hip, I like her low-ish set hocks and her shoulders to die for. I don't think she's ideally built for speed, so she feels like a dead end - I don't want to spend $3000 (AUS) on an unbroke horse, with additional breaking fees, only to work out that she's not the talent I would have hoped her to be. I'm worried about breaking a horse that late - Lola is 14, and defiantely was broken late. She's an old broody too; and its taken two years and a few arguments for her mind to really mature into a learning/riding/listening mindset. Whereas, I can spend the $5000 to get a going, mature-minded gelding who's a little pushy and forward, but is a definate prospect at competing and getting me into the circuits. It's basically the package there. I'm in the process of scrounging for some good instructors so I can keep up with the horse and not "ruin" what he knows - he feels like a pretty switched-on boy. Third option is basically option one, really. I knwo it all comes down to how much I put in, and how much I WANT to put in. I've never really bought a horse privately - I've always gone off and bought them from the pens, because I liked the idea of having a horse that when I put in all those long, hard days where all I want to do is throw down the proverbial reins, I can turn around and say "yes! We just learnt that! WE did that!" I love that feeling when Lola and I have worked hard on something, and we finally get it. I love knowing that we worked out how it works for us, and not sending her off to the trainer and crying "Fix her! Fix her!" I got her so green, she was basically the grinch. She was scared, nasty under saddle and just yuck - but I totally loved her. But her talent can only go so far - she's a thoroughbred and thinks cows are a little scary - they smell funny and drool lots, according to her. Ok. Novel Over. Ugh. I suck! Anyone felt the same? Or am I just a one woman circus?! [Crazy]
  2. my equine teacher and I were talking about this today in class. Would you ever put a nasty/dangerous to sleep? A horse that was just downright dangerous to ride, handle, ect? My equine teacher, for example, knew of a gelding who had been through the mill (bought from the sales as a rescue), and was horrible to ride and handle. as he was being rehab'ed, he was calm. Until he started to get some weight and began to feel good again. The owner, at a complete loss as to why her horse was so hostile, sent him to trainers. He would do everything in his power to cause some kind of injury to his handler or rider. The trainers eventually gave up on the horse, deeming him "Frankly dangerous." In the end, after a dozen people had tried to help his owner out with handling and general training, and countless vet visits to try and address if there any medical issues that was causing him to be so downright mean, the owner sought vet advice again, after ignoring trainers suggestions of having the horse PTS. This particular vet gave his honest advice, to put the horse to sleep, because he would never be able to sold on (as it was blantantly irresponsible of the owner), and that despite how much she cared for the horse, it was much safer for all parties involved to have the horse humanely pts. I found this to be the best option for horse and owner. It saved the owner any more injuries (of which could have eventually resulted in something serious), and in a way, saved the horse from being sent to another home, where he could have ended up anywhere - causing injuries to inexperienced people who saw "a pretty horse", the kill yards - the list goes on. But, what do YOU think? If you were (or have been) in this situation, what would you do?
  3. Cudas Scootin Dj Needs Barn Name

    Cherokee? Nevada? I had a little coloured pony on lease ages ago, his name was Comanche :) She's a doll, none the less!
  4. Witty And Fun Horse Shirts?

    I sniffed out Lucky Bucky clothing when i read about the HC tshirt comp, and I'm definately buying some of their shirts! They're fabulous! I'm hooked on the witty horse shirts right now; its great to see non-horse people getting a giggle from them. Does anyone know of any other online stores that sell witty one-liner horse shirts? I'm thinking of putting the feelers out to find some for me and my riding buddies!
  5. Witty And Fun Horse Shirts?

    Classic! That sounds like the first show I ever went to! [ROTFL]
  6. Witty And Fun Horse Shirts?

    I sniffed out Lucky Bucky clothing when i read about the HC tshirt comp, and I'm definately buying some of their shirts! They're fabulous! I'm hooked on the witty horse shirts right now; its great to see non-horse people getting a giggle from them. Does anyone know of any other online stores that sell witty one-liner horse shirts? I'm thinking of putting the feelers out to find some for me and my riding buddies!
  7. Pics From Yesterday

    That saddle is a Half-Breed saddle :) It's a cross between a western and a aussie stock saddle. usually, they dont put the horns on though They're fantastic saddles anyway! I have one! It's my trail saddle!
  8. Training Too Young.

    I've been asked to do a presentation on issues for my english class, and the racing industry was the first thing that popped out to me on the list our teacher gave us. I talked to her about it, as I don't know a great deal about the racing industry in general, but I do know enough to present to her and the class, the pros and cons of training horses (eg. racehorses, performance horses in general) too early, and pushing them too hard before their bodies are fully mature, how it effects the horse, his abilities if the proper care and time isn't taken, and how horses (like TBs) often end up with injuries and issues that stick with them for life, as a result of heavy riding as a youngster. I won't say I feel strongly about training too young; if it were my horse, I really wouldn't push for high levels of competition before the age of 4. Of course, unless my Vet thought that my horse was mature enough to handle it; but are those big purses and ribbons worth me risking the future health of my horse, regardless of how much he is worth? I think that horses can definately be trained early - especially and importantly groundwork. But I'd like to leave breaking until I felt completely sure his knees and back could handle the stress. I've always thought 2 1/2 - 3 was a good age to start riding, but I definately could be wrong! This is where you guys can help me out! I've got a showjumping trainer (who's also my Equine Studies teacher and high up in our local SJ club) to do a recorded interview, on what she thinks about pushing youngsters, how she trainers her horses, ect. I'm going to try a few other credible sources, such as another Instructor and a Welsh Breeder (not really relevant, but they're still equines!) to do biref interviews with aswell. I was going to talk about the large amount of unwanted, overbred/badly bred horses that go through the saleyards here, due to a multitude of reasons, and include how the Racing Industry contributes to the large number of horses that can't find homes, and how its completely ridiculous, unneccissary, and borderline cruel in some cases. But there's a small minority that will actually argue that point. At least with the training arguement, as my teacher said, there's another side(s) that can argue my points - and that's the whole purpose in the Presentation. Breed societies, trainers, breeders will argue my point (I think). So! What do YOU think? Are they racing thoroughbreds too early at 2 and 3 yo? Are the Performance horses being pushed too hard in their training, in order to reach Higher levels of competition and futurities? What age do you break, ride, train and aim to compete? Have you aimed for futurities; did you get there? Have you dealt with horses suffering injuries from racing, or injuries sustained from competing too young/before they were mature? most importantly, when do YOU know that your horse is ready to break and train, and then compete? I know horses get injuries, its no different to a Human Athlete - we get arthiritis, broken arms, ripped tendons - but it definately affects horses just as much, if not more. This post is definately NOT intended to offend ANY person on this board, I'm simply seeking information for and against my contention. It certainly helps me form my argument, or change it :)
  9. Training Too Young.

    I love Dr. Deb! My Horse Dentist went to a seminar she held here aaages ago, and just soaked in all of that information. We love her videos in Equine studies! It's always good to find out things like that (from bloodhorse.com), that there's not as many injuries as I thought. The couple that I've owned straight off the track, had some injuries that occaisionally gave them some hassles, but nothing a little bit of Ice Therapy couldn't fix :) Thanks for the input, Bumper! Please, keep the opinions and input coming :)
  10. Training Too Young.

    I've been asked to do a presentation on issues for my english class, and the racing industry was the first thing that popped out to me on the list our teacher gave us. I talked to her about it, as I don't know a great deal about the racing industry in general, but I do know enough to present to her and the class, the pros and cons of training horses (eg. racehorses, performance horses in general) too early, and pushing them too hard before their bodies are fully mature, how it effects the horse, his abilities if the proper care and time isn't taken, and how horses (like TBs) often end up with injuries and issues that stick with them for life, as a result of heavy riding as a youngster. I won't say I feel strongly about training too young; if it were my horse, I really wouldn't push for high levels of competition before the age of 4. Of course, unless my Vet thought that my horse was mature enough to handle it; but are those big purses and ribbons worth me risking the future health of my horse, regardless of how much he is worth? I think that horses can definately be trained early - especially and importantly groundwork. But I'd like to leave breaking until I felt completely sure his knees and back could handle the stress. I've always thought 2 1/2 - 3 was a good age to start riding, but I definately could be wrong! This is where you guys can help me out! I've got a showjumping trainer (who's also my Equine Studies teacher and high up in our local SJ club) to do a recorded interview, on what she thinks about pushing youngsters, how she trainers her horses, ect. I'm going to try a few other credible sources, such as another Instructor and a Welsh Breeder (not really relevant, but they're still equines!) to do biref interviews with aswell. I was going to talk about the large amount of unwanted, overbred/badly bred horses that go through the saleyards here, due to a multitude of reasons, and include how the Racing Industry contributes to the large number of horses that can't find homes, and how its completely ridiculous, unneccissary, and borderline cruel in some cases. But there's a small minority that will actually argue that point. At least with the training arguement, as my teacher said, there's another side(s) that can argue my points - and that's the whole purpose in the Presentation. Breed societies, trainers, breeders will argue my point (I think). So! What do YOU think? Are they racing thoroughbreds too early at 2 and 3 yo? Are the Performance horses being pushed too hard in their training, in order to reach Higher levels of competition and futurities? What age do you break, ride, train and aim to compete? Have you aimed for futurities; did you get there? Have you dealt with horses suffering injuries from racing, or injuries sustained from competing too young/before they were mature? most importantly, when do YOU know that your horse is ready to break and train, and then compete? I know horses get injuries, its no different to a Human Athlete - we get arthiritis, broken arms, ripped tendons - but it definately affects horses just as much, if not more. This post is definately NOT intended to offend ANY person on this board, I'm simply seeking information for and against my contention. It certainly helps me form my argument, or change it :)
  11. Is This Any Better? Riding Pics.

    I like TalktalkTalk's half-seat idea :) My old trainer used to go crook at me all the time, because I'd be too busy concerntrating on what I was doing ("Are my shoulders back enough? Are my hands too high? Are my heels down?"), rather than how/what/why my horse was doing. Julie: "Work out what your horse is doing, and then work out what you're doing, Amy!" Once I got that down in my cruddy AP, I found my dressage saddle that helped me feel really secure and put my legs right. However, i dont think you have any issue with your legs really. You've got lovely line from hip to heel, and once you get sure in your seat, your shoulders will come together :) towards the end of the video, your position comes really nice, especially in the downward transition! As far as the stirrups go, I used to ride a hole-up when I was riding/starting out with my All Purpose saddle, especially on a horse I didn't feel 100% on, or if i was testing a horse out. Sometime, I felt like my legs were really sloppy, and having them that hole or two tighter, made me feel a little more secure in the saddle. Someone told me it throws you off balance, but I found it helped me grip with my knees in case of emergency. But yes, It did sit me forward. Once I got confident with short stirrups, where I felt like my legs weren't sloppy and over-active, I let them down. Now, I can't ride short at all, unless I'm jumping (which is rare, as it is ) I found with my mare, who loves to hang off the bit in the trot and canter rather than giving and being soft - if I think of putting my elbows into my side and gently half-halting against the pull. I'll give about three-five gentle half-halts, and she'll come good. I did that for a while, and now all I have to do is give a very slight "check" on the rein when she thinks about pulling, and we have no issues :) Btw, Your mare is cute as a button!
  12. What Are These Bits?

    the ring bit reminds me of today's anti-rearing bit... The race trainers over here can't lead their horses onto the track without the anti-rearing bits in their horses mouths. Some trainers like to race in them, too.
  13. Outfit Choices:

    I found out there's a great little place about two hours from where I am, that holds little Jackpot Rallies/Training Days, that have almost the same sort of atmoshpere as a comp, but without the pressure. basically, its this guy who started up these little weekend shows for all the keen greenies, wanting to take their horses out and get a taste of what comps feel like, get some tips from the trainers that take their greenies out for some fun training and socialise. it's great; its like a learning swap-meet! I still haven't actually been out and about to a comp with my little mare, although we've been playing with the barrels and running medicore times, that for the standard I'm asking for (and the training we've put in), I"m really quite happy with. And she absolutely loves it! Anyway, as a curious woman that I am, I've noticed that the girls wear loads of different things, and I"m so torn over what I should wear to a jackpot rally! Going to rodeos to watch, I always wear a nice, longsleeve/button up shirt, jeans, belt and boots. but even at rodeos, I'm seeing heaps of the girls decked out in casual tee's. At the jackpots, its the same too! There's some people there that look really nice and totally decked out, and others that look completely casual. I guess I'm just asking, at a Rodeo/show,ect, do you decide casual (Nice Polo sort of Tee) or the Nice button shirt? Hmm...
  14. Barrel Pics!

    square exercises?! Do tell! I"m always for learning about new exercises!
  15. I've been thinking about breeding my little TB mare for a long, long time now. At least two years. But I'm still really aprehensive about it. I've gone and looked at loads of stallions, watched them work, looked at their pedigree 4 million times, and always found some reason not to breed. Afterall, Lola is basically the love of my life! She needs the best! I don't want to breed her to "just a pretty face" kind of stallion, and I want her baby to have a job. And Ideally, I'd really like to register the baby so I can always attempt to find him. She's a gun at barrels, really tucks herself and is fairly established in flat/dressage. She's got fairly nice conformation, but one of her pasterns (although it's never given her any trouble, whatsoever) is a little upright. Not enough to effect her at all, but theres that chance that it oculd be more apprent in her baby, which could effectively hinder him finding a home one day, if my circumstances ever have to change and I have to find him a home. however, she's got a temperment to die for! So trainable, lovable, easy going. She can kick into gear, and then be quiet as a lamb in the next breath. She's got everything, if I were to breed, that I would WANT to breed. My circumstances are generally, pretty darn good! My dad's just bought a property, and the fences are great, the grazing is ALL-YEAR-ROUND GREEN! (I got super excited that my girl was going to have rolling green pastures and trees all year round). I"ll be moving there in just a couple of months But if I ever have to move from the area ect, I want my proverbial foal to have every-bit of a chance to go to a good home, and hopefully never end up in the saleyards! Anyway, if I were to breed her, I"d breed to her a QH. I love the breed, love their temperament and conformation, and aimed to buy one before I met Lola. There was just no way I was going to pass her up! I thought she was an Appendix, but turns out she's a Studbook TB (chased up her papers and breeding info a few months ago). I've done a lot of research on all my stallions, emailed so many breeders about HYPP and HERDA. Some of them never got back to me, so I juts assumed they either: A) Hadn't tested had no idea that HERDA and HYPP are in Australia C) didn't even know what HYPP and HERDA was. So, here's where the novel turns around! I went to the saleyards a little while ago to poke around, and saw yearlings going for little over $300! (AU) Well-bred, cute little babies with not-too-bad confo. To be frank, i was completely shocked! And the greenies weren't much different in the prices either! So with that in mind, I thought about buying a baby, and giving THAT baby a chance, before breeding my own. And of course, the "mum thoughts" went through my head, after talkign to my Equine Studies teacher about Baby Statistics. Apparently, a report came out not too long ago, that something like 40% of horses under 3, don't make it, for reasons from Accidents, StillBirths, Early breaking resulting in Injury ect. Do I want to risk spending x-amount of dollars on a baby that COULD injure himself or not get past the age of 3? Do I want to risk My mare (although she's apparently had 3 foals) having birthing issues? Do I want to risk breeding a baby that could turn out to be a complete dud? Please give me some thoughts and opinions. I really like my "buy-a-baby" idea. I still get the gratification from knowing I've just offered a baby /greenie a chance (rather than potentially ending up in a hellhole), the learning experience and a potential life-time friend and work-mate?
  16. Decisions! Would Love Some Opinions And Thoughts...

    I'm generally more into rodeo/speed events, like barrel racings, poles ect. I took her off the drums when I thought she wasn't improving, and took her right back to the start and established everything else, did some minor competiting in ODE's, but both of us didn't really like it. She definately had the abiltiy to be a dressage horse, however we both got really bored with it. BUT! it definately improved her in every other field. if I were to breed, I'd like a foal for Barrels and possibly cows, as I'll need a work-horse also. Having a horse with cow-sense will definately help me on the property, as well at other station/farm jobs I'll looking at applying for once I'm done with school and I'm ready to take on a job, outside of the cafe!
  17. So My Little Prospect Can Jump! - Pix And Vids

    in that oxer video! WOW! He uses his rear so nicely! He's cute as!
  18. Breed Help.

    i'm just interested in the TB/Welsh combination. I heard of a girl around my area who has one, but i've got no idea how or what this horse would look like, let alone what it would be suited for. I'm thinking hunters? Can we post some pics, anecdotes, opinions etc. I'd really like to find out a little more baout them?
  19. D: My Horses Tail

    Lola's tail has diminished greatly. She's been wormed, she definately hasn't got lice and we don't have ticks in our area. I've tried bandaging it, and plaiting up the end, but it doesn't work because A) my bandaging skills aren't that flash, and i'm trying to get it better. whenever i put a leave in conditioner, and then put a tie on the end to keep it in the thick plait, she manages to ditch the tie and tail is out and dirty again I condition it probably every two weeks, and after I take her to the beach to wash the salt out. The top is getting better, but now the bottom end of her tail is thinning out. Gah! >< I dont brush it, but I grab the end of it and untangle it to try and keep it healthy-ish. I had a fried tell me to put some babyoil or cocoa butter on her dock to soften up the skin (it gets a bit dry) and put some moisture back in it. Should i get one of those tailbags that plait into the tail hair, or just buy her some fancy extensions for when we go out :tongue9: Any tips on keeping the bottom of her tail nice and healthy and just a little thicker, would be fantastic! Will post pictures soon, if they're needed. Her tail looks terrible; i'm *eventually* getting around to clipping the top for ponyclub again.
  20. Fundraising Ideas

    My equine class of 15 have been set the task of running and organising an event. It's always been a set class project every year, and usually they run pretty well. Our event's going to be a show/dressage/showjumping day, including freshmans jumps, a topsy ring, Fancy Dress, dressage tests etc. We form a committee, organise things and as committes usually go, everyone has their certain job. I've got the job of organising the fundraisers for the event, so we have some cash to pay for the ribbons, food, etc. I was just searching the interwebzz for some ideas. And Horsecity was my first choice, to throw some ideas around, get some opinions or some mroe ideas! Its not until August, which is our Late Autumn-Early Spring. But I'd really like to get some fundraisers going, so we have the cash to do thigns and prepare our event. We had an awesome (and successful) chocolate-sale happening, of like freddo frogs and other cadbury chocolates, but some of the younger kids got over-excited with the order forms, and ordered way too many and we had to send them back, hence the school put their foot down and no more chocolates. So anyways, here are some of my ideas, any more are definately appreciated :) - Sausage Sizzle/ Milkshake Day/ Pancake Sale these always go down heaps well at school, because our cafeteria ladies are health freaks. - Fundraising Tins these are probably the ones that I don't think will work the best, but its worth a go. - Trunk Sale everybody in our class gets their old junk (eg, headstalls, girths, leadropes, old kids toys, clothes whatever they please!) that they don't really need/care about, and can either go halves or donate the money from the sales they make to our tin. - Out-of-Uniform Day This would mean taking it to the School Council, and its a gold-coin-donation from every student who comes out of uniform. Our school's usually pretty large, so we generally raise about $600 because theres always students who don't bring a gold coin >< Any other suggestions would be hugely welcomed
  21. i live in Victoria, Australia, and where I live is a pretty large eventing and showing area. theres forever local events and horses everywhere. Anyway, i read on a message board a few weeks ago about a woman who's horse had been "murdered" (its the only word that I think fits) in his paddock, in Winchelsea - about half an hour from where I live. Here is the link to a local newspaper artile with the first attack:Horse Killed in Winchelsea The woman that I'm currently boarding with recently visited her brother, who also just had one of his own horses mercilessly and disgustingly killed. He did not feature it in the news, which I thought was kind of silly but smart at the same time, as he has other horses and is worried about further attacks. His horse had been bludgened and then slit along his windpipe, down under his chest. The owner had been away for three days, and come home to check his horse. When he called him up, and the horse didn't come cantering up to him, he went to search the paddocks, wondering if the horse had possibly gotten out. Instead, he found his horse lying in his own paddock. Months ago, a friend of a friend had a horse poisoned. He was an absolute sweetpea; all the kids loved him. We wondered if he had eaten somethign wrong, so the owner had an autopsy (?) conducted which found it was some kind of chemical that I'd never heard of. She was so devestated, and the police have yet to find out who done it. And the police haven't caught anyone for ANYTHING?! I've taken extra precausions and installed locks and chains on all of our gates, strung it in fron of our gates (no one comes in and our anyway), made sure all our hot tape is functioning and have moved all of the horses closer to the land owners house where she can hear and see whatever is happening better. This really freaks me out. I've heard of cats and dogs having terrible, terrible thigns happen to them, and that scares me enough. But my horses are my fur-babies. Who's with me on the idea that "You mess with my horse, you mess with me!"
  22. "I think my horse is a colt..." [Crazy] I agist in a fairly cheap paddock (agistment paddocks are pretty darn hard to come by where I live because of the drought, unless you want to pay $70 a week at the local boarding stable) with the land owner and her friend. I've been there over a year and the paddock is nothing flash, and I mean nothing flash. Half of the fences are decrepit, barbed wire things that are really badly strung. Along one side of the fence line, the wire is so loose that the shetland pony in our paddock slips through it -_______- We've hot taped the terrible bits, and I'm pretty satisfied with it now. There's not too much for them to hurt themselves on. In one place, where the two old ponies eat, we've strung hot tape in a V shape to stop them getting into the wire that has broken off. The horses are smart enough not to test it at least. I really want to take the fence down all together - I even offered to restring the whole 15 acres of paddocks myself (with my dads help ) just so I wasn't worried my mare wasn't going to rip her leg open. Luckily for me, I own a smart horse. We've totally fenced off the big huge part of the paddock, and strip graze them during the day time. But, as I've said, I've been here just over 18 months and I haven't had an injury yet.. I'm buying some more hot tape this week, and going to gently say to the land owner that I'm going to put it up for the horses own good. Anyway, Fences are the least of my worries at the moment... Recently, the land owner's horse passed away, and I had hoped (as callous as it sounds - I really did love the old girl, but in these times, extra space is extra grass) that the space in the paddock was going to remain empty. No sooner than a week had gone past, and the land owner had another agistee. Thats Ok, I thought, the woman probably needs the extra cash. We all do... THEN when the new woman finally arrives to wait for her friends bringing the horse in, I ask her about it. "Oh, its an appy," She said. "He's the sweetest thing aroundddd." In my own experience, Appy's are sweet, yes, but totally clueless. They're the Jessica Simpson/Paris Hiltons of the equine world. Maybe its just the Appy's i've come across: no offence to the Appy owners out there but I really just can't stand brainless horses, no matter how cute their spots are. So anyway, the trailer turns up and I'm expecing this big, fully grown fit looking spotty horse to amble off the trailer. Nope. Instead, some scrawny, half-donkey-half standardbred spotty thing comes off the trailer. "How old is he?" I'm trying to not laugh at it, but I sort of felt sorry for it at the same time. "18 months" I've never seen an 18month old foal in such a bad condition. He was tiny, ribby, had a topline to rival an antique thoroughbred and a big, boof head. And i mean boof. Think of a shire foal, with the big huge roman nose and rouned forehead, and then throw some spots on its bum. And you've got "Simon." Simple Simon. Of course, my usual questions come out, as the land owner (who is around 70, and doesn't really know a great deal about horses, she just bought some for her kids when they were in their teens) doesn't ask any questions about things: Eg, the time I gave her money to buy hay and she came home with 40 bales of MOLDY hay.I wasn't pleased... Of course, first questions was is he gelded? "Oh, I don't know" She says. "I can't see any bits there." Because she bought him from a breeder, I assumed they might have given him the snip, but left him as a rig. I'd never heard of colts having undescended testes before, but I suppose theres a first for everything. But I checked and theres nothing to lead me to think he has been snipped. SO the foal comes to our paddock, with an owner that assures me she knows what she's doing, its a colt, and I own a mare, and the fences would not hold a hot colt when and if my girl comes into season anytime soon. He;s started to grow and get healthy again, and my initial worries about him not geting the goodness that he needed to start off in life eg; the food to help his bones and muscles get nice and strong, have started to ease off. And he's getting really freaking coltish. He bites everyone, and has tried to kick me at least four times. He kicked the land owners handicapped son, and she did nothing about it. She's so money hungry! Currently, I'm paying $80 a month (with some petrol money so I can bum a lift home) to have my mare at risk of injuring herself on a loose barbed wire fence or getting in foal to some mile ugly appaloosa. I'm sorry, but I don't want a spotty thoroughbred. Anyway, I threw a huge tantrum after he kicked my the fourth time, and left a nasty little bruise on my arm from having a bite when I tried to catch my own horse to work her. I also work her in the paddocks, which is now becoming more difficult because when I shut goober-horse up in the little feeding area, he squeals the town down and send my mare off her head. My tantrum consisted of a little shouting, and plain ultimatums: Get the horse gelded IMMEDIATELY and teach it ground manners, or I'm gone. I'll work another job to pay to keep her in a better place where she's not at risk of getting sexy with a colt. My only problem is transport - no one in my family drives. My first attempt at the tantrum was really quite nasty, and I think I scared both the land owner and her new friend a little. I was pretty proud of my threat, actually Get your horse gelded. And when the vet comes, i'm getting my mare preg tested. If she's in foal, you have two choices: you pay for the abortion of the foal, or once he's on the ground and old enough to be weaned, I leave you with a spotted thoroughbred, take my mare and leave, because I absolutely want nothing to do with it. I'm having a hard enough time as it is paying for two horses, I don't need a baby to pay for as well. When I want to breed with my Lola, I'll make sure I'm getting a pay rise from my boss. Threats and Tantrums worked. Next day, the vet was phoned and little coltish simple simon was booked in for gelding in two weeks time. In the mean time, I've cooled off and even offered the new woman some help, after she'd dually noted how well mannered my horses are and how quiet they are, compared to rude little simon. I offered, in return for her getting her horse gelded so quick, that I will quite happily help her get some good, decent ground work established between her and her foal, not to mention everyone else in the paddock. Let me also note, that the woman sees her foal maybe twice a week, three times at the most. And thats just to put his feed bowl down on the ground for him. No work, no "lets put the headstall on and teach you how to lead and tie," or "lets start to get you a little desensitized to things". She declined my offer, saying that she wanted to teach her horse the Parelli method (which I so clearly know nothing about) and that the way I handle my horses is not the way Pat handles his. I thought about mentioning to her that Parelli can be a total waste of time, especially if you know already how horses think and the way they use their bodies and then decided stubborn is as stubborn does. and now, for the latest dramatic installment ! Apparently, the vet won't geld the foal until testes start to descend. Which, I'm not too sure about. My dad, an experienced horseman and breaker, told me to be a little careful of that statement, as we all know - anything can happen. -___- I know I shouldn't, But i've been teaching him ground manners on my own when no one else is out in the paddock. I've justified it to myself that "Its for my own safety". I'm just so tired of being bitten, kicked, striked at... People are pretty oblivious to him starting to be a little nicer to everyone. They're just like "wow, he's so much better now!" Yeah, thats because someone is paying attention to his training. sorry for my novel, but it feels a lot better now its out of my system. now for the questions: Is it possible for a colt to reproduce when his bits havent come down yet? Has anyone heard of undescended bits? Is it an appy thing? Should I just shut up and take my horse somewhere else, where I might have to pay that little bit more but avoid the drama? Should I just chill out and keep to myself? I'm a stress-head sometimes... this is Lola, and her thoughts on simon. Who wouldve ever guessed I got her for $300 from the slaughterhouse. She's going to be a total dressage star eventually. She's by a multiple group-1 winner called Luskin Star. I was pretty darn pleased with myself :)
  23. What Spells Stupid More Than...

    I'm currently awaiting a phonecall from a boarding place in the next town over, plus a couple of other empty paddocks around. Its just waiting on the farmer to decide whether or not he wants someone on his land. I'm geting excited. By the way... 1) Agisting, Agist etc is the same as boarding lol 2) I wasn't present for the phonecall to the Vet, and I'm going by what the landowner and horse owner said. 3) Zeusboy (?) was right, which is why the pictures come down straight away. 4) Lola's a thoroughbred, I love thoroughbreds, i thikn theyre absolute sweeties but i've seen some super dooper old ones with big high withers and boney toplines (which was due to helath issues, unfortunately), and the little colt looked nothing of an appy other than his spotty bum. He had no chest, no bum - he looked like a heinz variety. lol 5) the landowner and I had a lengthy and calm chat about the fences on the weekend, which I am glad to say are going and some new ones are going up instead. Understandably, she is 70 something: fencing and cash dont come easy when youre that age. So, i'll help with the fencing as much as I can, simply because I love the other horses in the paddock and don't want to see them having a run in with a picket. 6) Little colt has absolutely nothing there. I couldn't see nor feel anything, not even a little pair of grapes. Which was the first thing that made me think that he had been gelded or rigged, and sold as a colt with undecended bits. You know how you get some people selling studs for a little extra? Thats what I had thought had happened. I'd just be happy if a Vet came and looked at him in general, to see what he would think. 7) I havent even done so much as patted little colt. I asked the owner tonight, after she was getting frustrated with him because he wouldn't lead for her and kept biting her when she brushed him, if she wanted help. She snapped at me. She can go jump. And deal with her flustered, hormonal little thing all on her own. =D
  24. I bought my mare for $300 from the slaughterman, and she had pretty long toes then (about 12 montsh ago) BEcause i had just moved to the area, I used the farrier that the woman I agist with used. He turned out to be total rubbish, and gradually took all of my horse's heel off so that she was tripping all the time, and going lame at the slightest sight of a ride to the local pony club grounds (just over a kilometer away) I haven't yet had her shod, as financial's haven't allowed it and because I only ride her outside of the paddock once a month to the PC rally. I figured that, because I'm not hauling her off to comps that frequently, and she isn't being ridden on roads etc, shoes were going to be a blatant waste of cash. Anyways, I let her feet grow a little, and packed natural horse fats (purchased from our local slaughterman) onto her hooves. This, i learnt from my Dad, who learnt it from his Dad. Because its the same product of the horse, it still softens the hooves and absorbs better and faster into the horse's body. Sounds gross, but it worked really, really well. I noticed her offside front foot had started to get a curve in it, and I was still trying to find another farrier. I got onto one who could spare a morning for me. Because I work in the mornings, the land owner had to hold her for me everytime the farrier comes, so I'm yet to sit there and tell him exactly what I want done (to eliminate the curve, bring back some heel and get her back to normal). this has caused my horse to end up with an almost box feet, and a slightly pointy-outy offside hoof. >.< grrrr She pulled up stiff last fortnight after a fifteen minute slow work, and I lifted her hooves to realise that her sole came down further than her wall (go figure..?) So I've spelled her for the last 13 days, and noticed that her toes and walls have started to grow back again (yay!) but due to being in the pasture all day every day, her hooves are suffering from the hard, compact dry ground. Even with the hoof oil These are the pictures I took from today. I only pictured her main problem hoof, though, as the others all seem to be relatively ok. Front On. See how the offside pokes out that little bit and how short the farrier has cut her back? Offside, Side on - the curve isn't nearly as bad as what it was. Only now, the farrier has cut her back so that her pasterns aren't as nice and sloped as what the were Offside Front, Sole View - see dryness, excuse poop opinions? thoughts?
  25. Not so much on my mares conformation, but on my technique. I'm getting lessons, and working on my hip at the moment. I had gotten into a habit of shifting my weight on landing, causing Lola to swing her bum and want to scramble a little whenever we went into a turn. She fights me during every x-country lesson or round, and anything that does not have some kind of colour on it, she'll fly sideways at. I've started to get her over logs and tyres and littler things like that, and its just constant persistence on both of our parts. She is a pretty nervous x-country horse, but in the show jumping she's a total star. >.< I also know I have a bad habit of over compensating for myself going over some jumps. Sometimes I'm good, sometimes I look terrible. I'm completely aware of it and I'm working on it These are pictures from all over the place, some are at the Pony Club grounds during a lesson, some are from a clinic and some are from in the paddock at home. During a warmup in a lesson: Clinic: Clear Overcompensation During the clinic - obvious mistake here was looking at the ground. It was during a minute of frustration at her shying at it, and she jumped it and took me totally by surprise>.< critique away, and touch a little on Lola's jump as well. Please be aware though, that I know the obvious things where I'm going wrong, but anything else and how i could fix it would be highly appreciated At Home: Dropped the inside rein a little >.< edit: i give lola 10 out of 10 for dealing with me LOL