ckrepps

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About ckrepps

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  1. yeah Docs, I did ask about it. I had another cross post on it a few days ago, and got some great advice, as ussual! IT is from the the trauma/circulation impairment from the injury. It should grow out over time---just have to have the farrier keep an eye on it as it grows out. Also will get some films of the foot at our next check up. But since he is showing NO signs of lameness, don't really expect to find anything. Thanks!
  2. yeah Docs, I did ask about it. I had another cross post on it a few days ago, and got some great advice, as ussual! IT is from the the trauma/circulation impairment from the injury. It should grow out over time---just have to have the farrier keep an eye on it as it grows out. Also will get some films of the foot at our next check up. But since he is showing NO signs of lameness, don't really expect to find anything. Thanks!
  3. Hey Cheri...she seems to agree with you. I shot her an email today with pics and this was her response: "His coronary band has been bulging over the lateral aspect for quite a while. Do you think it has gotten worse? Is it over the hoof on the medial aspect as well or just the outside. I was watching that pretty closely for a long time- but it never seemed to change. Is there any heat in the hoof, is he lame at all, is he sensitive to palpation of that foot? There is no doubt that Flash had some vascular compromise on that leg. The hoof grows from the coronary band downward. My feeling initially when I first saw it was that it was a result of the compromised tissue and blood supply and that with time it would resolve. In order to do that the entire hoof must grow out before we can see a completely normal hoof again. So that means on the toe- ~12m, on the quarters ~6m. I can see a line of demarcation on the images you sent, where the hoof has grown about 1/2in (down to the constricted looking hoof). Let me know if there is any pain or heat associated with the coronary band and/or the hoof and we will go from there." Since he isn't showing any signs of laminitis, we will wait for his next vet check in a week or two and probably get some films of his feet just to be sure. If he should develop problems we will head on in--but I don't think that is the case. I will keep an eye on how it grows out though, in case we need to take any corrective measures. [ 05-14-2007, 07:31 PM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]
  4. Hey Cheri...she seems to agree with you. I shot her an email today with pics and this was her response: "His coronary band has been bulging over the lateral aspect for quite a while. Do you think it has gotten worse? Is it over the hoof on the medial aspect as well or just the outside. I was watching that pretty closely for a long time- but it never seemed to change. Is there any heat in the hoof, is he lame at all, is he sensitive to palpation of that foot? There is no doubt that Flash had some vascular compromise on that leg. The hoof grows from the coronary band downward. My feeling initially when I first saw it was that it was a result of the compromised tissue and blood supply and that with time it would resolve. In order to do that the entire hoof must grow out before we can see a completely normal hoof again. So that means on the toe- ~12m, on the quarters ~6m. I can see a line of demarcation on the images you sent, where the hoof has grown about 1/2in (down to the constricted looking hoof). Let me know if there is any pain or heat associated with the coronary band and/or the hoof and we will go from there." Since he isn't showing any signs of laminitis, we will wait for his next vet check in a week or two and probably get some films of his feet just to be sure. If he should develop problems we will head on in--but I don't think that is the case. I will keep an eye on how it grows out though, in case we need to take any corrective measures. [ 05-14-2007, 07:31 PM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]
  5. Thanks Serah By now people are probably surprised to find that he is actually a 4 legged horse with a head!
  6. Thanks Serah By now people are probably surprised to find that he is actually a 4 legged horse with a head!
  7. Thanks Cheri. I too am hoping that is what it is. I emailed my vet last night with pics and should hear back from her today. I will have films of his feet done, just to be sure and I will have the farrier keep a close eye on the hoof as it grows out.
  8. Thanks Cheri. I too am hoping that is what it is. I emailed my vet last night with pics and should hear back from her today. I will have films of his feet done, just to be sure and I will have the farrier keep a close eye on the hoof as it grows out.
  9. Thanks Chocomare. He just came home from the vetinary hospital a little over 3 weeks ago. He was in for treatment for almost 7 weeks. I had noticed the area before (while he was still at the vets) and kept meaning to ask about it--but kept forgetting. He had no signs of laminitis while he was at the vets, and he hasn't exhibited any signs since he's been home. He doesn't appear to be sore, even in the injured leg--certainly not standing spread-eagle or anything obvious. You can tell the ankle is still swollen and if he is running in the pasture, you will notice a slight weakness and favortism in that leg when he makes a turn( he severed the extensor tendon in his accident), but that's about it. Of course, he hasn't been on any gravel--he just came out of stall rest this past week. The vet had him trimmed while he was there--just before he came home. He has had several radiograph's done, but my assumption is she (the vet) was looking for bone damage to the wounded area of the leg..not the feet. My vet has been so great with everything else, I would hate to think she would have missed a case of laminitis right in front of her eyes for weeks --not to mention whoever the farrier was she used while he was there. This is not a change that has occured since he's been home--as I said, I noticed it while he was still there. I'll give her a call tomorrow and ask a few questions. I'll be taking him back soon, for another set of films on the leg...I'll ask her to shoot the feet while I'm there. [ 05-13-2007, 02:26 PM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]
  10. Thanks Chocomare. He just came home from the vetinary hospital a little over 3 weeks ago. He was in for treatment for almost 7 weeks. I had noticed the area before (while he was still at the vets) and kept meaning to ask about it--but kept forgetting. He had no signs of laminitis while he was at the vets, and he hasn't exhibited any signs since he's been home. He doesn't appear to be sore, even in the injured leg--certainly not standing spread-eagle or anything obvious. You can tell the ankle is still swollen and if he is running in the pasture, you will notice a slight weakness and favortism in that leg when he makes a turn( he severed the extensor tendon in his accident), but that's about it. Of course, he hasn't been on any gravel--he just came out of stall rest this past week. The vet had him trimmed while he was there--just before he came home. He has had several radiograph's done, but my assumption is she (the vet) was looking for bone damage to the wounded area of the leg..not the feet. My vet has been so great with everything else, I would hate to think she would have missed a case of laminitis right in front of her eyes for weeks --not to mention whoever the farrier was she used while he was there. This is not a change that has occured since he's been home--as I said, I noticed it while he was still there. I'll give her a call tomorrow and ask a few questions. I'll be taking him back soon, for another set of films on the leg...I'll ask her to shoot the feet while I'm there. [ 05-13-2007, 02:26 PM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]
  11. Can any of you with hoof experience tell me what this "overgrowth?" of the coronary band is? This is my gelding who suffered a traumatic injury to that leg requiring 2 months of stall rest and bandaging. A platelet derived growth factor was used to treat the leg wound. I'm wondering if the band was caused by the growth factor medication, or is it a symptom of the traumatic injury. It is a hard raised kind of rubbery growth, more prominent on the outside of the hoof. Any thoughts? Will it grow out and go away over time? [ 05-13-2007, 11:42 AM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]
  12. Can any of you with hoof experience tell me what this "overgrowth?" of the coronary band is? This is my gelding who suffered a traumatic injury to that leg requiring 2 months of stall rest and bandaging. A platelet derived growth factor was used to treat the leg wound. I'm wondering if the band was caused by the growth factor medication, or is it a symptom of the traumatic injury. It is a hard raised kind of rubbery growth, more prominent on the outside of the hoof. Any thoughts? Will it grow out and go away over time? [ 05-13-2007, 11:42 AM: Message edited by: ckrepps ]
  13. Thats okay Heidi, I can certainly understand! He really is not that big..must be the angle of the shots..he's right about 15 hands. Please excuse the "barn" in the background...not my place. They took an old cow shed and turned it into a barn..it's pretty decent on the inside. And the area where he is tied to the post is just used as a tack-up area. Nobody is turned loose in there..lots ot stuff to get hurt on.
  14. Thats okay Heidi, I can certainly understand! He really is not that big..must be the angle of the shots..he's right about 15 hands. Please excuse the "barn" in the background...not my place. They took an old cow shed and turned it into a barn..it's pretty decent on the inside. And the area where he is tied to the post is just used as a tack-up area. Nobody is turned loose in there..lots ot stuff to get hurt on.
  15. oh yeah, and this is the coronary band growth I was talking about in my earlier posts...anybody have any ideas? You can also see it in some of the close ups of his legs.