CanadianHorses

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Everything posted by CanadianHorses

  1. New Addition

    Wanted to share a photo of our new addition. This little lady is a newly turned 6 months old filly. She is a Canadian Horse which is unfortunately a endangered horse breed. Here is our little girl. She is sweet as a button. Barely handled, so we have a lot of work to do.
  2. New Addition

    Thank you she is a sweet but rascally filly.
  3. 1936 Olympic Cross Country Course

    Waw! What a great video!
  4. Cross Country Vest

    Getting into eventing with my mare, and I am looking at purchasing a cross country vest. Budget is no object because safety is our prime concern. For those of you seasoned cross country riders, what do you think is the top of the line best to get? Which ones to stay away from? Thanks so much!
  5. Breeding Canadians

    Found this article which I thought was interesting. Shows the sad reality that the breed will likely be gone in the near future. Great article I wanted to share. Always on the hunt to promote the breed. A great article about the breeding of Canadians-which is unfortunately quite sad as the breed is going extinct. Consider the following So you are a Canadian Horse mare owner and you are thinking about breeding your mare. Here are some facts regarding what is going on with the breed at present: Foal registrations are at a catastrophic low, with 150 or less Canadian foals being registered per year. Keep in mind, that is 150 Canadian foals being born per year in the entire world! At these numbers the breed is simply not sustainable, and will likely die out within a decade or so. At least 500 foals per year are required to be able to sustain current population numbers, let alone to grow them. At present, there are currently just over 3000 mares 20 years of age or less, left in the breed. Of this number, probably at least 1000 are too old or too young to be used by breeding. This leaves only about 2000 mares in the entire breed that are reproductively capable. Recent surveys of horse ownership done in Quebec and BC indicate that nearly 50% of all mares owned, are in homes where they are used as the primary riding horse and where there are no plans to breed them EVER! Thus, although breed numbers on first glance appear ok, the reality of the situation is that the number of mares left in the breeding pool may be as low as a 1000 or so which may actually contribute to the breed. Of those, very few owners are, or are planning on breeding them in the near future. This coincides with declining stallion ownership. Prior to 2008, there were between 20 - 30 Canadian stallions standing at stud in BC. According to a recent survey, there are now only about 10 stallion owners left in the province who are currently breeding. Of these, the majority are located in remote areas of the province and do not offer shipped semen, so these stallions are not easily accessible to the majority of mare owners. This means that currently in BC, there are now maybe only 3 or 4 stallions that are centrally located and that offer comprehensive breeding services making them readily available to mare owners. This same scenario is being observed all across Canada. Many stallions are aging out of the breed. Case in point, our stallion Zipper. Once he hit 20, his semen quality began to rapidly deteriorate. By the age of 24 we were no longer able to ship his semen. He is now infertile. Sadly, we can't tell you how many people have said to us "Oh, we have ALWAYS wanted a Zipper foal. If only we had known. We always wanted to breed to him but were going to do it in the future!". Our other stallion Fonzie will soon be in the same position. And we are not the only breeders facing this scenario. Many quality Canadian stallions are aging and will be unable to sire any more foals in the near future. Don't wait to do it in the future. Now may be your last chance! Mares are getting older. As they age, they become less reproductively sound, and progressively harder and more expensive to get in foal. It is considerably easier to get a young mare (less than 10 yrs) in foal than one that is in her mid-teens. For those mare owners who keep waiting for "the right time" it very well may be that when the time is right for you, your mare will be well past her prime and difficult if not impossible to get in foal. This exact scenario occured with us ourselves last year. We had three mares (ages 15, 19 and 19) we were trying to get in foal. Despite extensive experience in breeding, fertile stallions, considerable veterinary intervention and considerable expense ($5000!) we were unable to get any of them pregnant. We had waited too long! Devastating financially and emotionally, and for the breed, very sad as as that is now three more mares who have now aged out and who will no longer be able to contribute. SO many valuable mares in the breed are in this position! Many breeders (especially those who keep stallions) are getting older and they are not being replaced by an up and coming younger generation. Once these older established breeders and their breeding stock age out of the breeding business, there is NO ONE coming along to replace them!!! This situation is echoed in each Canadian province. There is no question that the breed is in serious trouble. Registrations are at an all-time low, many breeders have gone out of business, and the vast majority of mares are in the hands of single owners who have no plan to breed them or to try to preserve their lines in the breed gene pool. Victoria Tollman, Executive Director of the Equus Survival Trust very eloquently summed up the situation. She says, “Every worthy mare should be in purebred production and contribute at least two foals (or more if you can support that) back to the gene pool. Every mare should also have a good daughter to replace her in the breeding program when the mare is retired." "Still each person's situation is their own, and they must act accordingly. Only you know what you can support. And if you can't support any [foals] during the breeding life of your horses, I suggest you lease them out, trade them for a gelding or senior Canadian in need of a retirement home, or sell or gift them to breeders who can. You owe that to your breed. So, no ... it's not easy being a rare breed steward. The sacrifices are many. The challenges tough. The rewards? Priceless ..." Those of us concerned about the breed’s preservation urge Canadian mare owners to seriously consider Victoria’s suggestions. To ensure that the breed continues, and that every mare’s genes contribute to the gene pool, we hope that all mare owners will consider breeding their mares at least once or twice. In order to best contribute to the breed, choose the highest quality stallion possible, and which best compliments the mare. In order to make your breeding count, it’s not enough to choose a stallion based on convenience or the most affordable stud fee. Be open to using reproductive technologies such as shipped cooled or frozen semen to produce the best foal possible. If you are not in a situation where you are able to breed your mare and raise a foal, consider leasing her out to a breeder who can. There are various Canadian Horse lists (see links page) where you can put your mare's information out there to see if there is anyone interested and suitable. Last but not least. We are currently losing a tremendous number of horses from the breed simply because their breed registration information is not being kept up. It may be that we have lost up to a third of the horses in the breed due to their being lost to the breed registry from sellers not doing the paperwork! Transfers are not being done with sales, and foal registrations are not being completed. In Canada, the seller is legally responsible for paying for and doing the registration or transfer papers for any horse sold as purebred or registered. ALWAYS be sure to register your foals after they are born, and especially before they are sold! It is unethical, not to mention illegal to expect the buyer to have to do this, or even worse, not to bother doing it at all. It is unbelievable how many horses have been tragically lost to the breed registry due to their breeders/sellers not following through with these simple steps. See the top of our page on "Buying a Canadian Horse" for more information on this tragic subject that is slowly decimating the breed. Help to maintain Canada’s beloved National breed before it is too late!
  6. New Addition To Misfit Farm

    His colouring is super cute. Oreo is a really cute fit.
  7. Freezing Buckets, Question...

    Never liked heated buckets either, but you can get floaters that will prevent the buckets from freezing, and they are an excellent way to correct that issue. We use them here all winter long, and I guarantee you our winter temperatures here are far colder than what you will ever have to deal with. Insulation always helps, but it will never be sufficient unless you have some warmer venting happening(from the earth or heater).
  8. New Addition

    A great article about the breeding of Canadians-which is unfortunately quite sad as the breed is going extinct. Consider the following So you are a Canadian Horse mare owner and you are thinking about breeding your mare. Here are some facts regarding what is going on with the breed at present: Foal registrations are at a catastrophic low, with 150 or less Canadian foals being registered per year. Keep in mind, that is 150 Canadian foals being born per year in the entire world! At these numbers the breed is simply not sustainable, and will likely die out within a decade or so. At least 500 foals per year are required to be able to sustain current population numbers, let alone to grow them. At present, there are currently just over 3000 mares 20 years of age or less, left in the breed. Of this number, probably at least 1000 are too old or too young to be used by breeding. This leaves only about 2000 mares in the entire breed that are reproductively capable. Recent surveys of horse ownership done in Quebec and BC indicate that nearly 50% of all mares owned, are in homes where they are used as the primary riding horse and where there are no plans to breed them EVER! Thus, although breed numbers on first glance appear ok, the reality of the situation is that the number of mares left in the breeding pool may be as low as a 1000 or so which may actually contribute to the breed. Of those, very few owners are, or are planning on breeding them in the near future. This coincides with declining stallion ownership. Prior to 2008, there were between 20 - 30 Canadian stallions standing at stud in BC. According to a recent survey, there are now only about 10 stallion owners left in the province who are currently breeding. Of these, the majority are located in remote areas of the province and do not offer shipped semen, so these stallions are not easily accessible to the majority of mare owners. This means that currently in BC, there are now maybe only 3 or 4 stallions that are centrally located and that offer comprehensive breeding services making them readily available to mare owners. This same scenario is being observed all across Canada. Many stallions are aging out of the breed. Case in point, our stallion Zipper. Once he hit 20, his semen quality began to rapidly deteriorate. By the age of 24 we were no longer able to ship his semen. He is now infertile. Sadly, we can't tell you how many people have said to us "Oh, we have ALWAYS wanted a Zipper foal. If only we had known. We always wanted to breed to him but were going to do it in the future!". Our other stallion Fonzie will soon be in the same position. And we are not the only breeders facing this scenario. Many quality Canadian stallions are aging and will be unable to sire any more foals in the near future. Don't wait to do it in the future. Now may be your last chance! Mares are getting older. As they age, they become less reproductively sound, and progressively harder and more expensive to get in foal. It is considerably easier to get a young mare (less than 10 yrs) in foal than one that is in her mid-teens. For those mare owners who keep waiting for "the right time" it very well may be that when the time is right for you, your mare will be well past her prime and difficult if not impossible to get in foal. This exact scenario occured with us ourselves last year. We had three mares (ages 15, 19 and 19) we were trying to get in foal. Despite extensive experience in breeding, fertile stallions, considerable veterinary intervention and considerable expense ($5000!) we were unable to get any of them pregnant. We had waited too long! Devastating financially and emotionally, and for the breed, very sad as as that is now three more mares who have now aged out and who will no longer be able to contribute. SO many valuable mares in the breed are in this position! Many breeders (especially those who keep stallions) are getting older and they are not being replaced by an up and coming younger generation. Once these older established breeders and their breeding stock age out of the breeding business, there is NO ONE coming along to replace them!!! This situation is echoed in each Canadian province. There is no question that the breed is in serious trouble. Registrations are at an all-time low, many breeders have gone out of business, and the vast majority of mares are in the hands of single owners who have no plan to breed them or to try to preserve their lines in the breed gene pool. Victoria Tollman, Executive Director of the Equus Survival Trust very eloquently summed up the situation. She says, “Every worthy mare should be in purebred production and contribute at least two foals (or more if you can support that) back to the gene pool. Every mare should also have a good daughter to replace her in the breeding program when the mare is retired." "Still each person's situation is their own, and they must act accordingly. Only you know what you can support. And if you can't support any [foals] during the breeding life of your horses, I suggest you lease them out, trade them for a gelding or senior Canadian in need of a retirement home, or sell or gift them to breeders who can. You owe that to your breed. So, no ... it's not easy being a rare breed steward. The sacrifices are many. The challenges tough. The rewards? Priceless ..." Those of us concerned about the breed’s preservation urge Canadian mare owners to seriously consider Victoria’s suggestions. To ensure that the breed continues, and that every mare’s genes contribute to the gene pool, we hope that all mare owners will consider breeding their mares at least once or twice. In order to best contribute to the breed, choose the highest quality stallion possible, and which best compliments the mare. In order to make your breeding count, it’s not enough to choose a stallion based on convenience or the most affordable stud fee. Be open to using reproductive technologies such as shipped cooled or frozen semen to produce the best foal possible. If you are not in a situation where you are able to breed your mare and raise a foal, consider leasing her out to a breeder who can. There are various Canadian Horse lists (see links page) where you can put your mare's information out there to see if there is anyone interested and suitable. Last but not least. We are currently losing a tremendous number of horses from the breed simply because their breed registration information is not being kept up. It may be that we have lost up to a third of the horses in the breed due to their being lost to the breed registry from sellers not doing the paperwork! Transfers are not being done with sales, and foal registrations are not being completed. In Canada, the seller is legally responsible for paying for and doing the registration or transfer papers for any horse sold as purebred or registered. ALWAYS be sure to register your foals after they are born, and especially before they are sold! It is unethical, not to mention illegal to expect the buyer to have to do this, or even worse, not to bother doing it at all. It is unbelievable how many horses have been tragically lost to the breed registry due to their breeders/sellers not following through with these simple steps. See the top of our page on "Buying a Canadian Horse" for more information on this tragic subject that is slowly decimating the breed. Help to maintain Canada’s beloved National breed before it is too late!
  9. Super Excited Pics Added

    What a cutie!! Congrats!!! You must be over the moon!!
  10. So 3 Years Ago Today....

    Losing a great horse is always hard. It's great to see you still remember him and think about him.
  11. Driving Breeds?

    Canadians make excellent driving horses. Depending on the bloodlines, some of them were bred with driving in mind, other lines have lighter and taller Canadians. They tend to be very willing and easy to train. If it's your first time getting into it, I would suggest to look at horses that have lots of miles and experience to give the best possible opportunity to learn. What kind of driving were you looking at getting into?
  12. Just Starting Out

    Keeping an eye on this thread. Lots of great information. Appreciate the time you took goodhors to share some of your knowledge.
  13. New Addition

    What are you talking about in your last sentence?! I started this thread to share photos of our new addition, and you've turned this post into something it does not need to be. Perhaps you should take your attention back on your horses.
  14. New Addition

    The battle of the breeds is no longer, but why don't you compete and represent your breed in the demos?
  15. New Addition

    Sadly the numbers are so low that they are endangered, but you're right in that last year they had gone up enough to come off the list. Unfortunately the numbers have severely declined again. I work on a few different programs with the registry, which is why I have this info. We are super happy about the filly. Excited to see how she turns out. As for genetic study, I will provide you with the most current one from 2014, once I step out of the office. Here I have added the Abstract of the study: The Canadian breed of horse invokes a fascinating chapter of North American history and as such it is now a heritage breed and the national horse of Canada. The aims of this study were to determine the level of genetic diversity in the Canadian, investigate the possible foundation breeds and the role it had in the development of the US horse breeds, such as Morgan Horse. We tested a total of 981 horses by using 15 microsatellite markers. We found that Canadian horses have high values of genetic diversity indi- ces and show no evidence of a serious loss of genetic diversity and the inbreeding coefficient was not significantly different from zero. Belgian, Percheron, Breton and Dales Pony, unlike the light French horses, may have common ancestries with the Canadian and could be important founders. However, the Shire and Clydesdale influenced the Canadian to a lesser extent than French and Belgian draft breeds. Furthermore, our finding indicated that there was no evidence of a clear relationship between Canadian and Oriental or Iberian breeds. Also, the Canadian likely contributed to the early development of the Morgan. Finally, these find- ings support the ancient legends of the Canadian Horse as North Americas first equine breed and the foundation bloodstock to many American breeds and may help in the management and breeding program of this outstanding breed in North America. Key words: Equine, Genetic Variation, Heritage Breed, Microsatellite, Population Genetics, Phylogenetic Subject areas: Conservation genetics and biodiversity.
  16. New Addition

    The genetic study for them shows that the strongest gene in Canadians is actually Lippizaner and Andalusian horses, however there is some Morgan in them. That might be why you like the look of the breed. I would love to do that.
  17. We Qualified! :d

    That is so exciting! so happy for you. We have some qualifying shows here locally for some Canadian Horse specific competition, but we have been entering some bigger events over the last 2 yrs. That is such great news for you guys! thats great! love your photos, your horse is absolutely adorable.
  18. Coblet Is Lame

    I absolutely love the countryside in your area. We are covered in 2 feet of snow right now where we are. Wish you all the best with you horse. Went thru the same thing once with a horse I had, but it did not turn out well and i was heartbroken. Ill keep my fingers crossed for you.
  19. New Baby Colt

    What a darling!
  20. 11 Y/o Twh, Critique Please!

    The head is a little bit disproportionate with the length of the neck. When you measure from the poll to the top lip, the length of the head should be shorter than that of the neck. Going into the neck, the neck is a midge short which dictates a little bit how he uses his head to shift his centre of gravity and maintain his balance. The neck should be 1/3 of the overall length of the horse which this horse is just shy of reaching. There is a lack of topline which is easily corrected with riding. A shorter neck makes it more difficult to flex and bend and is crucial for balance and collection. A lot of the time a shorter next is accompanied with a more upright shoulder which you can see in this horse. Because the neck muscle helps pull the shoulder and front leg forward, a shorter neck means a shorter stride. I can't assess the chest because there are no photos available. His upper leg, his humerus is nice and long which provides more leverage and consequently more strength and power to attached muscles. Length also increase the range of motion which allows for greater arc at the elbow. A long humerus also increases the mobility of the elbow. Cant assess forearm spacing due to lack of photos. The knees look great and no calf knee or bucked knee is present. When looking at the lower leg, I can see round bone which is undesirable because the tendons are too close to the canon bone all the way down. This means this horse would be more prone to stress those tendons during fast work, uneven terrain, steep hills etc. His pasterns look great. You usually want the slope to be 47-55 degrees to give the horse sufficient leverage and power and shock absorbing ability. His stifle should be at the same height as the elbow, and they are pretty close. It provides more leverage of the hind quarters. Its in the direct line with the hip bone. Cant assess the hock properly because of how the horse is standing. The horse is also standing on a hill(or it looks like an angle in the photo). The height of the hock should be the same as the chestnuts in the front which is the case. Cant assess anything else in the hind leg because of how the horse is standing, so it would not give a fair assessment. Also no other photos available. The horse is build downhill. Means it will be more difficult to get the horse to move off his front end and power from behind when ridden. This horse has a deep girth giving him plenty of room for his lungs to expand during hard work. Don't want to comment much on the shoulder angle,
  21. Critique On My 2014 Apha Stud Colt

    The only time I will take to do a critique is when the poster takes the time to post proper conformation photos. Without proper photos, you really cannot make a proper assessment.