chet

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About chet

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  • Location
    Outlook, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • Interests
    Kalevi (my beau), Flint (my horse)
  1. Slight Lameness - Stepped on glass

    Thanks. I actually don't "routinely" pare off sole. The sole sloughed off on its own and I pared off a bit more to check if there was a bruise there. Thanks for the advice. I will check out your websites and go to a vet. Justine
  2. ~*~No Tie Zone~*~

    Hi again =) Here are my directions for making a rope halter, if you want to try to make one for yourself! I'm trying to find a picture of my horse with the halter on, to show you how I loop my lead rope onto the halter, but I can't find one. The way I do it, it never comes loose, but yet it is easy to adjust and take off if you need too. If you know your knots, it's like a square knot, except one of the ropes is a loop, so you only have one tail instead of two. Justine
  3. ~*~No Tie Zone~*~

    Hi again =) Here are my directions for making a rope halter, if you want to try to make one for yourself! I'm trying to find a picture of my horse with the halter on, to show you how I loop my lead rope onto the halter, but I can't find one. The way I do it, it never comes loose, but yet it is easy to adjust and take off if you need too. If you know your knots, it's like a square knot, except one of the ropes is a loop, so you only have one tail instead of two. Justine
  4. ~*~No Tie Zone~*~

    Further to BayFilly's comment, I would recommend getting her giving to pressure before you think about tying her up. A gram of downwards or sideways pressure on your lead rope should get her dropping her head immediately. But this doesn't always work! My gelding broke a few leads too. I remedied this by making myself a rope halter (1/4 inch rope) and getting a 3/4 inch lead and just looping it onto the halter - no hardware. I've never heard of a "never-break" halter or a "no-pull" halter, but my yaught rope halter has never failed on me. My gelding panicked like your girl. After he broke a few leads, I got a guy with a breastcollar on his horse to try to pony him. I've never seen a horse jump like Flint did! It was so frustrating. Finally, when he quit pulling back and rearing quite so much, we tied him up solid and just let him pull. I was praying my halter didn't break. It took a solid 10 days of tying for an hour to get him trained. He flipped himself over once and that's all it took. I didn't see it happen, but when I came back there was dirt and grass all over his back and head, and he was standing calm and didn't even move his head when I waved my hat and coat at him. Hopefully your little girl will learn. I know it's frustrating! Just find a deep, deep post and make sure there's no hardware on your halter. I would actually like to see a picture of these "no-break" halters. Whatever you do, I would adivse not to use a halter like the one she has on in the picture. I've a severe hate on for those stupid nylon halters! (no offense!!) Good luck! Justine
  5. ~*~No Tie Zone~*~

    Further to BayFilly's comment, I would recommend getting her giving to pressure before you think about tying her up. A gram of downwards or sideways pressure on your lead rope should get her dropping her head immediately. But this doesn't always work! My gelding broke a few leads too. I remedied this by making myself a rope halter (1/4 inch rope) and getting a 3/4 inch lead and just looping it onto the halter - no hardware. I've never heard of a "never-break" halter or a "no-pull" halter, but my yaught rope halter has never failed on me. My gelding panicked like your girl. After he broke a few leads, I got a guy with a breastcollar on his horse to try to pony him. I've never seen a horse jump like Flint did! It was so frustrating. Finally, when he quit pulling back and rearing quite so much, we tied him up solid and just let him pull. I was praying my halter didn't break. It took a solid 10 days of tying for an hour to get him trained. He flipped himself over once and that's all it took. I didn't see it happen, but when I came back there was dirt and grass all over his back and head, and he was standing calm and didn't even move his head when I waved my hat and coat at him. Hopefully your little girl will learn. I know it's frustrating! Just find a deep, deep post and make sure there's no hardware on your halter. I would actually like to see a picture of these "no-break" halters. Whatever you do, I would adivse not to use a halter like the one she has on in the picture. I've a severe hate on for those stupid nylon halters! (no offense!!) Good luck! Justine
  6. Hi everyone! Sorry...it seems like I only come on here when I need advice. My gelding Flint was suddenly lame on Monday when I was out setting up some electric fence. I went over and made him move out and he is lame on his right front foot. I picked it out and I found a small piece of beer bottle glass packed in with the manure. There was quite a thick layer of manure in between his hoof and the glass so I didn't think it would hurt him after I took out the glass. Tuesday, he was still limping quite badly. When I picked his hoof on Monday, his sole finally came off (I can't believe it took until June to shed!) so I thought that would help too - nice, new fresh sole. Didn't help I guess! I tapped on his hoof with the pick and with my finger, and he didn't jerk away. There are also no soft spots. I trimmed his hooves yesterday and pared away a bit more sole, but he doesn't seem to be getting any better. I've rubbed his leg to feel for swelling and sore spots, and there's nothing. Also, his hoof isn't warm at all. The only way that he's improved is that he can stand on the lame foot when I pick up the other front one. On Monday and Tuesday, I tried to pick up the other foot to pick it out and he almost fell over. Would like to get riding again! Any suggestions? Thanks very much! Justine
  7. Another 3 year old critique post!

    You know what...the first thing I did when I saw that picture was BUG MY EYES! She is a beautiful little girl. She really reminds me of my boy, except he's about 100 pounds heavier and manly-lookin Love the colour hey? I don't like her back legs though, they look like they're camped out a bit, and a bit straight in the hock, but could just be how she's standing. Pastern and shoulder angles are beautiful, but her hip looks a bit weak. Again...sigh! Beautiful girl.
  8. I agree, very nice confo shots! The sand makes a good background! His legs really are quite nice. He might be a bit upright in the pasterns, but that is not obvious. I really don't like his neck either, and his head might be a bit long, but that could just be the pictures. He looks like a really good horse - nice and average, if you know what I mean! Not bad, and not outstanding. I'd sure like to have him on my place, he looks like he'd be a good worker.
  9. Ditto on equi's suggestion - NO TREATS! You have to be VERY consistent, and VERY patient. Politeness is something that is relatively 'easy' to fix, but it will take a lot of dedication and will probabaly take quite a while. With the blower, just take it slow. Make him stand beside it, when it's just sitting there. If he sniffs at it, etc., let him do it until he is ok with it (watch for licking and chewing, sighing, etc.) Then stop the lesson, and start it again the next day. It's just like sacking out, except it's with a blower or a hose. Personally, I find this problem the most fun to deal with. It is SO rewarding when your horse walks across a tarp, or through a gap in the fence, or under a bunch of streamers - without blinking an eye - when they would have absolutely FREAKED before! Good luck!
  10. Ditto on equi's suggestion - NO TREATS! You have to be VERY consistent, and VERY patient. Politeness is something that is relatively 'easy' to fix, but it will take a lot of dedication and will probabaly take quite a while. With the blower, just take it slow. Make him stand beside it, when it's just sitting there. If he sniffs at it, etc., let him do it until he is ok with it (watch for licking and chewing, sighing, etc.) Then stop the lesson, and start it again the next day. It's just like sacking out, except it's with a blower or a hose. Personally, I find this problem the most fun to deal with. It is SO rewarding when your horse walks across a tarp, or through a gap in the fence, or under a bunch of streamers - without blinking an eye - when they would have absolutely FREAKED before! Good luck!
  11. Vet School Help - Another question

    Hey Lynn, what school are you going to? I'm in Alberta right now too But I'm taking Livestock Production - a cakewalk compared to vet. med. Are you taking a pre-vet or vet-tech course first? Best of luck! Advice? Remember to be yourself, and everything will fall into place. Justine
  12. Vet School Help - Another question

    Hey Lynn, what school are you going to? I'm in Alberta right now too But I'm taking Livestock Production - a cakewalk compared to vet. med. Are you taking a pre-vet or vet-tech course first? Best of luck! Advice? Remember to be yourself, and everything will fall into place. Justine
  13. I thought about cysts too. I don't know much about equine repro problems, but I know quite a bit about cattle repro problems - and I'm assuming it'd be about the same, although you usually don't worry about being thrown from a cow Keep us updated, Bumper!
  14. I thought about cysts too. I don't know much about equine repro problems, but I know quite a bit about cattle repro problems - and I'm assuming it'd be about the same, although you usually don't worry about being thrown from a cow Keep us updated, Bumper!
  15. Peoples Eating Habbits?

    quote: Originally posted by goldentoes: outside of the times when a little etiquette is called for... I just don't understand why people care what someone else eats. People at work do this to me all the time- like they're just compelled to make a comment about what I'm eating. Whether it's "now I see why you're so skinny!" or "I wish I could eat that" or "that's quite a breakfast you've got there..." I just don't get why anyone pays attention to what's on someone else's plate. I HATE THAT! I absolutely cringe when someone is looking at my plate, or other people's plate. It's almost like they're treading on your personal space. Another thing - when people stare at the food you buy at the grocery store. I make a lot of whole wheat bread and do a lot of baking. One day at the store I had wheat germ, cracked wheat, bran, milk (about 8 litres of it...I swear my fiance is a calf!) , baking supplies, juice, and also a lot of fruit and veggies on the counter, and the man behind me, who was grotesquely fat, commented, "Wow, looky that. That's why you're so slim and trim!" And he even went on to say "I wish I could be thin like you." And I'm not even that thin! But, I did look like a toothpick compared to him. Ugh. I basically just ignored him, which is kinda hard to do in a small town. Anyway, it grossed me out and I thought, serves him right for being fat! Not that I don't like overweight people...it was just easy to pick on that particular part of him. Plus he smelled really bad.