Sign in to follow this  
BisQuickDoc

Gatsbys gone from bad to worse!

Recommended Posts

ok so went out to the barn this morning and his back was bad and something wasnt quit right with his hind end. Thankfully the vet tech. that boards 2 of her horses at the barn was there this morning and i had her look at gatsby, she though his back was pretty bad she suggest i take him to the equine clinic(yet another vet) and they i trotted gats in front of her and she said his hocks were really bad and that she'd think he'd need hock injections and there could be a big problem [Me Cry][Me Cry][Me Cry]

i'm so scared that this is growing into something big and i cant stop crying [Me Cry] i call the vets and they dont have an apointment open until tuesday unless i bring him into the clinic as an emergency ands that atleast $120 with out them even looking at him. My mom wants to wait, i dont and now were fighting about it and she thinks i get to upset about it and she thinks hes fine! we were actuallly screaming at eachother and its just a huge mess!

WhATS WRONG WITH MY GATSBY?!?!?! [Me Cry]

what are like hock injections all about?

what could be wrong with his hocks?

[Me Cry][Me Cry][Me Cry]

[ 09-12-2005, 01:49 PM: Message edited by: BisQuickDoc ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm soo sorry to hear that! [Me Cry]

Hock injections help TONS! I had a OTTB that had to have them and it made a huge difference in the way he acted. He could have bone spavin or bog spavin, either one.. I guess [Confused]

Sorry I'm not much help. I hope all goes well! [Huggy][Angel]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calm down. It's not an emergency. Hock injections can help certain types of hock problems. Bad hocks are definately not an emergency and they don't cause a sore back.

Gatsby's back hurts, so it makes sense that he wouldn't feel like using his hind end much.

Ask a human with a sore back if they feel like trotting.

The person you checked with is a vet tech and not a vet. The vet wouldn't be able to tell you if Gatsby had arthritic hocks without an x-ray.

Your vet tech friend was trying to be helpful but she didn't go to all those years of veterinary school.

I'm not a vet. I don't know what is wrong with Gatsby's back. I definately believe he needs to be looked at by a vet, but............... it's not an emergency visit. There's no need for that charge.

How about letting him rest til you get the vet there. How about getting a vet that you are going to build a relationship with. This is probably going to take more than one visit. It wouldn't make sense to use a different vet every time.

Pick a vet. Make an appointment with him/her office, even if it is a week in the future. Let the horse rest til then. Don't keep trotting him out. Don't keep pestering him with saddles. Keep him in and let him rest.

Do something different when you get an expert, professional opinion from a qualified equine veterinarian. Do not act on ten different unqualified opinions.

We all go through crap with horses. You just get them going and they are laid up for three months. It happens. Then they are better and you start them again til the next time they are laid up. It happens to athletes. It's just life in he horsey world.

Hang in there and don't panic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the vet feels its important enough to take him to the clinic, then maybe have her talk to your mother?

what exactly wasnt right with his hindend? When was he last shod? What type of footing did you trot him on? Exactly how are you testing his back for soreness?

Hock injections are NOT the end of the world. They have been proven to rebuild cartilige *sp* within the joint, which keeps the joint moving comfortably.

Dont freak out until the vet examines him and tells you what they think. Nothing is def. yet. A lot of back and hock problems can stem from the feet as well. Id start at the base and work up. Did he have any heat? Swelling?

I know how it is to have your horse hurting and not knowing what it is. But stay calm. Getting mad and fighting with your mom isnt going to make it better. I know its hard and you think she doesnt understand. If you talking to her isnt helping, try to get the vet to talk to her.

[ 09-10-2005, 09:40 PM: Message edited by: KrazyTBMare ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my mom only talked to the vet tech. and my mom said the same thing Rem did, "shes not a vet", that must be that "old and wise thing" [Wink]

(no offense rem [Not Worthy] )

the bad thing is my mom cant take off owrk to go to the vets so i'm skipping school and my uncle and my pappap are going to take me and gatsby to the clinic. I dont know why i'm really fighting with my mom, i feel so bad [Me Cry] but i thinks its all just the stress from EVERYTHING. i should be so thankful to her cuz she basiclly handing me a blank check and letting me take gats to the vet. now i feel really bad.

[Me Cry]

i talked my trainer(who i now kinda hate [bang Head] ) and she agree to let me keep gats inside for a few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my goodness. Don't test for soreness. Don't trot that horse around anymore (torturing him) so you can GUESS at what's wrong. I would be fairly certain it has nothing to do with the way his feet are trimmed though.

Noone on this board (kid or adult) can tell you what is wrong with Gatsby. Noone's going to know but the vet when he/she does an evaluation. Certainly not the farrier. Even CVM, the vet on the health board would have no idea what is wrong with him without seeing him in person. A tape is not going to do it.

Oh, I came back here because I wanted you to tell your mom that I agree with her. LOL!! Sometimes moms are right you know. In this case, I am backing mom.

I will add that if he were my horse, I would have had him on total rest plus bute (to reduce inflammation) for at least ten days to two weeks before I called anyone. If things didn't get better, I'd call my vet (not the chiro yet.)

But that's me and yes, I'm probably older than your mom. [big Grin]

[ 09-10-2005, 09:55 PM: Message edited by: Remmie ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol i'll tell me mom you said that rem!

She sends lots of hugs!! [Huggy]

he havent been on bute until today(after we talked to the vet and made an appointment and she said we could bute him). Thanks Remmie!!! [Huggy][Huggy][Huggy]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know having an injured horse is stressful, believe me of all people I really do understand.

Just let him rest for now, have the vet out, and do what the vet says. In the long run, doing so will help speed up healing time.

[ 09-10-2005, 10:04 PM: Message edited by: Santas_Girl ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto to everyone else. No sense is overstressing yourself by worrying what could possibly be wrong with Gatsby [Huggy] Course I say that as the non owner, but if I were you I'd be doing the exact same thing, heck I was dry heaving over stressing out for the new pony! [Huggy] and [Angel] that everything will be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i also am no stranger to horsey injuries (my horse has had a total of two months and three weeks on stall rest this year for various ailments. the first thing to do is make sure he stays as comfortable as possible until the vet checks him out. try to be calm even though i know that isn't easy. trust that your vet will be able to figure out what's wrong and that gatsby will get better. good luck!!! [big Grin] i hope your boy gets better soon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with everyone else. Keep him in and let him rest until you've been to the Vet. and he tells you from there. Now that you have him on the butte, he is going to appear to be feeling much better. DON"T let that fool you. Continue keeping him in until he sees the Vet. He will be fine. The best thing you can do is remain calm for Gatsby. He will sense if you are stressed and that will make him stressed to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal opinion may not be what u want to hear, but I am only going to say this because I know from experiance what hock injections are. Take a football player for example, he gets injured in the game, and yes they inject his knee with a cortisone shot, similar to what Gatsby will be getting if u decide to do hock injections. Giving the injection to the football player deadends the pain, he gets back in the game after about a month of injections. The football player not feeling any pain over exerts himself. Gatsby may im not saying he will, but may over exert himself playing while on the injections, because the pain is gone, and thats all it is, it isnt fixing the actual problem, just covering it up. I have seen to many people use Hock injections in the hunter/jumper and eventing classes, they then take thier horses out onto the field and they ride them as if nothing was ever wrong, and eventually the horse injures himself beyond help, which leads to eventual putting to sleep. I will admitt that I have used Legend, but I lessend my horses exercise abilities and turned him from a 4th level dressage horse, to a trail horse. I would just think about it and do research before jumping into it. I know you want what is best for Gatsby, and I know you don't want to see him in pain. Just do what you feel is right, not only from your knowledge of horses, but what you feel in your heart. I just hate seeing horse owners covering up the problem instead of fixing it to an affordable degree. Im not bashing others for using it, because Like I said I used them before as well, Im just offering the information I know. The hock injections my horse recieved yes only covered up the problem, but kept him out of pain until I was able to afford the money for treatment. But sadly one day in the pasture about a week after his injections, he literally pressure fractured his hock, and I had to put him to sleep. If you do get them, I would suggest putting him in a smaller than usual paddock than what he is used to, and of course if you have a pasture mate. That way he doesnt try to over exert himself to much. I hope you figure out the source of his pain, that way the two of you can start to heal. Good Luck and God Bless!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be patient and try to stay calm...this is unfortunate, but not an emergency. (You need to remember to relaxx incase some day you have a real emergency!) Like Remmie said, horses injure themselves all of the time! They live for it and a lot of performance horses require different care and maintanence. Let him chill until you get the vet out and don't jump to any conclusions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sore hocks actually can cause a horse to have pain in their backs, so I am going to have to disagree with you Remmie. We've have an event horse who's initial symptoms were a sore back and his problems were in his hocks and another dressage horse that was also the same way, and acutally a frinds hunter who she thought had saddle problems. Change in movement from what my vet said can cause the muscular system to lock up and cause soreness, but I'm not the vet [Wink] so I just have to listen to what he says. Our experiences I guess are just different I guess.

As to giving the horse bute, that is a good idea, but it will hinder the vet in knowing what is going on, so if you are planning on the vet looking at your horse, you may want to advise the vet that you have given the horse X amount of bute X times a day for X days and have them tell you whether or not they want you to pull the horse off the bute before they see Gatsby. It is kind of a waste of your time and money if the vet has to do guess work because the pain is masked because of bute.

Having a steady relationship with a vet will be a good thing because you will be able to call and set things up and get feedback from them, as well as to ask things like "what do I do." I know that's what I can do with my clinic and I would reccommend you and your mom choosing a vet clinic and go ahead set up an initial consult and establish a relationship so if you have a true emergency you have someplace to turn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

As to giving the horse bute, that is a good idea, but it will hinder the vet in knowing what is going on, so if you are planning on the vet looking at your horse, you may want to advise the vet that you have given the horse X amount of bute X times a day for X days and have them tell you whether or not they want you to pull the horse off the bute before they see Gatsby.

the vet(at the clinic were takeing him to) ok us giving him bute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck with the vet! Horses get injured all the time, and rest does wonders. Essentially, only the vet can tell you for sure what's going on.

Before you go the route of hock injections, Finish Line joint supplement is great for horses with arthritis issues. Maybe the saddle fit problems aggravated some old injuries/arthritis. Maybe chiropractic would be good too. Overall, ask the vet for his recommendations. It's probably something that easily remedied.

You'll feel better when you know what's going on, and I know he'll be okay. We all get stressed out when our horses are off, and 99.5% of the time it turns out just fine.

Sounds like you have a great mom who's really supportive of you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He is pretty young, isn't he? The three that we had that had to be injected were: Murphy 13; Ceile 12; Electra 12. Murphy was competing Preliminary at the time; Ceile was showing hunters and jumping 3'6 regularly; Electra was going 2nd level and older. Murphy and Electra had raced, but had also been on joint suppliments since I had them--we do that as a matter of course although scienctifically it is up in the air about the usefulness of it. Ceile was not mine and the girl that owned her tried suppliments for a while but them decided she was missing too much riding time and just injected her.

I hope that you find out what is going on with you guy soon since it is never fun to not know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s what I thought too, Ella, but according to my vet, the age of “change” is around 6-8. That is when the joints first changing and begin the fusing process. Depending on how intensive the horse’s work load was early on will dictate when it first needs hock injections. (Or at least that is how I recall my vet explaining it to me last fall!) We believe before I got him, my horse was used fairly intensively early on for Western Pleasure, Reining and sliding stops, so his hocks were used and abused quite a bit at a very young age. He needed his first hock injections – just the lower joint, not the full set of upper and lower – when he was 6. I maintain him with Adequan now, and he is doing fabulous. Hopefully he won’t need another set of injections for awhile.

~Shelly~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor Gats! [Me Cry]

I always wait to see if something will take care of itself before calling the vet. Or, wait to get a better idea of what I am dealing with (unless, of course, it is an emergency). But this doesn't sound like an emergency. It sounds like he will probably need to be looked at (especially if it's getting worse), but take a deep breath and relax. [Wink]

When is the vet scheduled to come out to your barn?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by BisQuickDoc:

i talked my trainer(who i now kinda hate
[bang Head]
) and she agree to let me keep gats inside for a few days.

Just remember... Gats is YOUR horse... your 'trainer' doesn't need to agree for you to give him a break. Sure, she can make recommendations, but she doesn't get to make his care decisions.

I agree with everyone who is saying he needs to be rested until a firm diagnosis occurrs. Even if he appears to be 100% sound tommorrow, do NOT let anyone talk you into working him until you get a professional opinion on what is going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BQD--I'm so sorry about what you're going through. [Huggy] It's always scary when this animal who can't talk or tell you what's going on is clearly not himself and there's not a whole lot you can do. I've been there and I can completely empathize.

Ditto to all the good advice you've gotten so far. Make friends with a vet that knows what they're doing...they will be priceless to you.

I'm prayin' for you and Gatsby, dear... [Angel] and I'm probably older than your mom, too. [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Even if you keep him inside, handwalking/hand graze him several times a day if possible. Otherwise, he could be much more body sore when you pull him out for the vet.


well he is aloud to go in and out of hid own private paddock and it does have grass, but i take him out to graze, lol espically all this past week because i havent been able to ride/work him [big Grin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this