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redneckgrl

Charged at while lunging

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Your horse has no respect for you. You need to show him whos boss. Have you ever tryed using a lunge whip, but dont hit with it just show him its there. But first make sure that he is not in an pain, and that pain is causing this.

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***puts on flame retardant suit*** You have a lunge whip. Use it. On the horse! No need to beat the bugger to death, just two or three quick HARD lashes to drive it out of your space. This is dangerous behavior. Better to have a brief "fear of God" session now than a serious injury later. Remember the three second rule. Correct the behavior within three seconds, for three seconds. Later and longer than that and the horse may not make the association of WHY you are whaling on it.

One caveat -- I am assuming that the horse knows how to lunge and is not acting out because of some sort of pain. The above is an extreme reaction to a dangerous behavior issue to prevent later injury from an unruly horse.

Tracy

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If you have already eliminated pain as an issue, then your horse does NOT respect you or your space. This behavior is extremely dangerous. Even if the horse is in pain it should not be tolerated and if your horse respects you he will not do it. I suggest you turn to a trainer or someone in your area who is knowledgeable and take their advice. I do not advocate using a whip on a horse but you have to get his attention.

I would suggest you go back to ground work and building a relationship with the horse. He should want to please you. If you are not already aware that this is very, very dangerous behavior, then you aren't knowledgeable enough to solve the problem yourself. Please seek advice and assistance before someone, probably you, gets hurt very badly.

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quote:

Originally posted by TracyA:

***puts on flame retardant suit*** You have a lunge whip. Use it. On the horse! No need to beat the bugger to death, just two or three quick HARD lashes to drive it out of your space. This is dangerous behavior. Better to have a brief "fear of God" session now than a serious injury later. Remember the three second rule. Correct the behavior within three seconds, for three seconds. Later and longer than that and the horse may not make the association of WHY you are whaling on it.

One caveat -- I am assuming that the horse knows how to lunge and is not acting out because of some sort of pain. The above is an extreme reaction to a dangerous behavior issue to prevent later injury from an unruly horse.

Tracy

I totally agree with this! This is a dangerous situation. Be careful!

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I'd have to agree with Tracy about using the whip on the horse. I don't like to have to hit my horse but I will if I have a reason for it and the way I see it.....if he has intentions of hurting me just cause he doesnt want to do something then he deserves to get popped.

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I would say that you should get your horse to a trainer or a trainer to your horse. Not only does he not respect you but your post gives the impression that you aren't taking this as serioulsy as you should be.(forgive me if I'm wrong)

It takes a strong firm hand and a strong resolve to stand up to a horse that is threatening you with bodily harm.

Working with a trainer seems to be your best option here. That way they could help to get you back on track and then help you not to go back down that same path.

Good luck and be safe! [smiley Wavey]

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Are you endlessly drilling the horse on the longe? Does he have soundness issues? Is he fit? How is the footing? Give the horse every chance to do things right, but any kind of agression must NOT be tolerated! John Lyons would tell you to wack him with the whip. The thing is he would add no more than 3 times and NEVER above the knees. Yes, you must do it within a few seconds. Make him think he is gonna die with voice and body movement. If you do it right once should be enough, twice maybe.

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Lunging is very similar to riding. You wouldn't accept this behavior under saddle, and you certainly should not accept it on the lunge. With that said, lunging is an art and knowing that, you need to be focused and ready to react quickly.

If your horse is moving forward, and paying attention to you, he cannot come in at you. Trust me I know. My horse used to be terrible on the lunge line.

Do you use side reins when you lunge? If you don't, see if you can have an experienced instructor teach you how to properly use them. This will help the horse to be "on the bit", and frankly I find that horses are in more of a work mindset when they are on the bit.

Then pay close attention to your horses natural rhythm. Count the normal beats in his walk, trot, and canter. Odds are that his beat changes just before he comes in at you. When you're able to recognize a change in his beat, you can use the whip to remind him to go forward before he gets the upper hand.

And remember, it's not the harshness of the whip that gets the reaction but the quickness.

[ 01-21-2006, 08:13 AM: Message edited by: Santas_Girl ]

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i agree, this is a totally innacceptable behavior, and being so one of the times where your gonna have to buckle down and smack him, hard. im not meaning to beat him by any means. but when he charges crack him a good one with the whip, and if he tries to kick you pull as hard as you can on the lunge line (this will pull his butt away from you) and MAKE him keep moving, if he bucks smack the ground and make him go faster (horses cant buck if you MAKE them go forwards). If he rears pull and smack him on the butt (again cant do it if hes going forward) and most importantly when he stops, continue for a while, PRAISE him, let him know you can still be nice. tell him es a good boy, and let him slow down.

its important that YOU do this, not a trainer. the horseis having issues with you, you need to fix it.

***edited to add; althoughb i do believe it should be you lunging him, having a trainer there to help you is a good idea

[ 01-21-2006, 01:53 PM: Message edited by: Maple ]

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quote:

Originally posted by mattiesmymare:

quote:

And remember, it's not the harshness of the whip that gets the reaction but the quickness.


Santa's got it right! Horses assume that if you are quicker than them, you are stronger.

Yep, it's the shock value, not the sting that gets the result.

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Thanks for the tips!! [smile] I do have a whip and I use it to follow his butt but I never have the heart to whip him...you guys are probably right...he needs to be smacked if he's charging at me!!! He is very good under saddle and respects my commands but has trouble lunging. I will use your tips to guide me.

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Thanks for the tips!! [smile] I do have a whip and I use it to follow his butt but I never have the heart to whip him...you guys are probably right...he needs to be smacked if he's charging at me!!! He is very good under saddle and respects my commands but has trouble lunging. I will use your tips to guide me.

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I have to make a statement here...

This is where the internet can get dangerous. Without having first hand knowledge of the OPs skills, as well as the horse's level of training (not to mention aggression), it's very unwise to give any advice other than: Get professional help.

A fearful, defensive horse trapped in a round pen or on the end of a line can be an extraordinarily dangerous thing. If the OP is not skilled enough in control of her own body and the whip AND her emotions, she could actually provoke a more serious attack from the horse by using a whip on him. (She strikes him, he gets madder and charges harder at her, she backs away and/or falls down, he attacks... horrible, but not without precedent.) By reading well-intentioned advice on the boards instead of having hands-on help from a pro, she may try something that could get her seriously hurt, or killed.

The ONLY advice that should be given when someone is facing overt aggression from a horse is to seek professional help. Please keep this in mind for the future, everybody.

And, OP, please find a trainer in your area to help you through this. You may only need one lesson to sort things out, but it's NOT normal for a horse to act as you are describing. It could be pain, but more likely it's simple confusion, fear and disrespect. Be safe and fair to both yourself and the horse. Get hands-on help.

[ 01-22-2006, 10:03 AM: Message edited by: MHJLittlefield ]

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MHJ Littlefield is right... It can easily turn into something very ugly if the OP doesn't have enough knowledge, reaction time, physical strength, and experience to handle the horse's behavior effectively.

Definitely get a professional who works with problem horses to help you out. Most likely, the horse will need to be retaught/taught to lunge properly. People don't always realize that not every horse knows how to lunge, and sometimes prior owners don't stop bad behavior on the lunge line and then it snowballs.

That type of aggression is very dangerous. Stay safe...and get professional help!

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