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MyMareKitty

with double reins vs. without

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ok so over the weekend my friend and i (Khabreanna) were discussing about trying our horses with a pelam(sp?) and double reins. well since i have one already today i went out and tried it and kitty went AMAZING in it. she didn't lift her head at all! right on the vertical..i was about to cry. it's so hard for me to get her like this. my point is..im not changing how i ride or my position..but how come i cant do this with just one rein..i know its much easier with double reins but i really want to be able to get her like this w/o them. so i can show without them. gosh i wish i would've taken pictures [Duh] but i didnt think she'd go that well! tahnks!!

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Yep. It's easy to get that "head set" with a curb shank and a chain/strap. That is why it is not allowed in lower level dressage. The whole horse has to come to the bit because of your seat and leg and not just your hand.

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quote:

Originally posted by Remmie:

The whole horse has to come to the bit because of your seat and leg and not just your hand.

meh. i know..its just that she's either in the mood (rarely) or just like..no im not listening. i mean i use a lot of leg and seat and my friends have gotten on her who are very good at dressage and say that she's hard and even my trainer has..i just want to be like blah. haha but will practicing in double reins help more with shows where i just use one? probaly not huh?

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hey,

so, here's my little story,

this summer i learned and taught my halfinger pony saddle seat, which ment riding in double bridle. which has to reins also

picture of us

just ignore the fact that my reins are to long and it looks like im pulling,

now frist i taught him how to bridle up in a snaffle. (ok not what your trying to do.)

then i added the double bridle, which i basically rode on the snaffle rein anyways, and yea it was easier to get him up in the bridle with the double bridle and the curb, but since i taught him in a snaffle he was correctly up in the bridle,

and it was hard, and i would only use the double bridle about once a week after he got use to it.

So not much of a story is it?

but maybe if you want, try riding in the pelham once every couple of weeks to help give your horse the idea, but its not something i would really just play around with.

HAve you lunged your horse in side reins very much?

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MyMareKitty; look at your own signature line: A true rider isn't afraid of a little dirt.

And working through a horse's problems is part of the dirt. But it is also the fertilizer on which beautiful things will grow. And as any true gardener knows, it is the quality of the foundation: the dirt and the seeds, which will eventually result in beautiful flowers and plants.

Pulling your horse's head into a frame won't help her move correctly through her body. It won't help her become softer in the bridle. In fact, over time, it is very likely that the response you get now in the pelham will gradually disappear until neither the snaffle nor the pelham results in the desired frame.

Your dressage rider friends and your trainer may have all agreed that your horse is difficult. Fine. That simply means you have your work cut out for you. And in dressage there is ALWAYS something to work on, so it really isn't that big a deal. Dressage, as Charles De Kunffy very astutely pointed out, is for people who enjoy the journey, not for people who just want to "be there." And the journey IS the day to day schooling; the work.

If you don't want the work, if you "just want to be like blah," as you so elegantely stated, then don't worry about her frame or headset and just goof around. No, you won't advance very much doing this, but at least you'll succeed in being "like blah."

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In dressage, things take time. You might, might get a quick fix if you ride in the pelham; however, I think you know, and everyone else does too, that it isn't the correct way to do it. As so wonderfully pointed out above, more than likely it will cause your horse to eventually fall back and just end up where you are now, if not further behind--even if you just ride in it once a week or so. It is the sign of a true horseman to do the right thing and stay the course. Nobody said this was easy, and your horse is harder, but that is going to make you a better rider. I do know where you are coming from, and the rewards when things finally do come together are great. They will come, but it is going to take time, hard work, and the results are going to seem like they don't come at all for a while.

It took probably 18 months of remedial work to get my mare's canter where we needed it. For the first 4 that I worked with my trainer, it was the end of show season, so I tagged along with her group, but the following year, I showed in the spring at 1 show and we decided that she was not ready to move up so it didn't make sense. Her homework wasn't done. That was April, by September, she was moved up to doing 1st2 and getting 68s. By October, she'd figured out and gotten strong enough to do the counter canter in 1st 4 and get 65-68%s. Although I would have never believed it, and did not plan to move her up until June, the current plan is to show her 2nd level in April with taking her out at a couple of schooling shows this month. And it is now easy. But it was just as hard as you describe your issue as being, and it stayed that hard for a while. Gradually, it got easier. It is a journey and while there are short cuts, it is generally best to not take them. Good luck with whatever choice you make.

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It's a discussion you need to have with your trainer, but only after she's seen you ride your horse in the pelham. I'm not one to say it can only be a horrible answer because some horses do need a "tune-up" every so often in a slightly stronger bit. I ride my own Thoroughbred in a loose ring 90% of the time on the flat, but if he has time off or has been especially strong, I put him in an eggbutt and figure eight we normally use for jumping. It gives me enough leverage for one or two rides that when we go back to the loose ring he's much softer and responsive to my aids.

However, a stronger bit is not the answer to you problems. It should be merely a refinement tool, you should get similar results in a lighter bit, and the stronger one simply makes things just a bit better. It takes some horses quite a bit of time to "get it" when it comes to dressage. My horse couldn't canter long sides when I got him. It's all about patience and dedication.

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quote:

MyMareKitty; look at your own signature line: A true rider isn't afraid of a little dirt.

And working through a horse's problems is part of the dirt. But it is also the fertilizer on which beautiful things will grow. And as any true gardener knows, it is the quality of the foundation: the dirt and the seeds, which will eventually result in beautiful flowers and plants.

Pulling your horse's head into a frame won't help her move correctly through her body. It won't help her become softer in the bridle. In fact, over time, it is very likely that the response you get now in the pelham will gradually disappear until neither the snaffle nor the pelham results in the desired frame.

Your dressage rider friends and your trainer may have all agreed that your horse is difficult. Fine. That simply means you have your work cut out for you. And in dressage there is ALWAYS something to work on, so it really isn't that big a deal. Dressage, as Charles De Kunffy very astutely pointed out, is for people who enjoy the journey, not for people who just want to "be there." And the journey IS the day to day schooling; the work.

If you don't want the work, if you "just want to be like blah," as you so elegantely stated, then don't worry about her frame or headset and just goof around. No, you won't advance very much doing this, but at least you'll succeed in being "like blah."

Very well said!

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thanks for your help! and no im deffinitly not doing this all the time. i've been really working on getting her round..it was just a little experiment to see how she'd act. im so excited to get back into dressage! thanks for everything guys!

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I only ride my old schoolmaster in his double bridle every once in a while. Yes, he is more through in it, but he needs to be the same in a snaffle and not rely on the double bridle... [big Grin]

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