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hesacatch

Your Personal Definition of a "Good Score"

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Personally, what do you think is a good score? Are you happy with a 58%? Do you feel that a 60% is a high score? I just want some opinions on this. Everyone is so different about the way they view scoring.

Now, if you're one of those obsesive compulsive people who isn't happy with anything less than a 75%, please refrain from posting.

Thanks.

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I've never shown Dressage, but trainers and friends have. I've seen them go, seen their scores, and sort of been able to make my own guidelines for what I think a good score is.

The judge, the location, the happenings, your horse's mindset that day, your mindset that day...they all play a big role, but theoretically if you take out a lot of those variables, this is how I see it:

Scores in the forty percent range to me say something drastic happened or you aren't ready for your level of showing yet.

Low to mid fifties usually say there's some sort of barrier between you and your horse, but you could be doing worse and are on the right track.

High fifties and low sixties usually deserve a pat on the back, and are nothing to be ashamed of.

Mid sixties say "you're in the zone."

High sixties and (especially) low seventies say to me that you should start thinking of moving up.

Mid seventies or higher usually indicates a loss of challenge and a need to move up. I know a friend who's personal best this season is 78.35% at Training 4. Her goal is to get an 80% this season. I think that's a bit excessive, only because the horse is ready for more than she will let him compete at, but she wants big, impressive scores.

Anyways, that's JMO. Hope it helped some!

*Edited because I can't spell*

[ 06-01-2006, 04:02 PM: Message edited by: Dreamin' ]

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I think a good score doesn't have to be high and you don't have to win but is how you do the test. For example: you could never get good transitions but at this show you did. I think today's people (not all) are getting too competive and becoming harsh or cruel to their beloved animals. Just remember shows are fun [big Grin] !

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When your more focused on the score, then the test itself, and the ride you gave it, your showing for the wrong reason. Don’t get me wrong, aiming to have a certain score is great (and heck, we SHOULD have a goal!)

That being said, a good score for me (in Eventing terms, of course [big Grin] ) would be a 29-30, but a fairly consistent “good” score for me would be 35 (excuse the backwards marks, im not sure how to translate it to Dressage...)

-Red [smiley Wavey]

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i recieved a 58% on my first dresssage test, and i was not too happy. although it was my first test, i knew i could do better. than on my second test, higher level with the same horse, i recieved a 68, which i was quite happy with. i am happy with anything over 65, but i would prefer a 70. lol

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When I first started showing in dressage, judges seemed to give almost exclusively 5's and 6's. I could consistantly win classes with scores of 60 or 61 percent.

Today, I find the judging has improved a great deal, partly because judges are more willing to use the range of scores available to them. I have seen everything from 3's to 10's. (I have yet to see something less than a 3. I received that for a rear and bolt, the figure started but not completed. Personally, I think a 3 was generous, but let's carry on...)

Because of this, a 60% is no longer a winning score, and more importantly, if I were to ride a test that received a 60%, it would not feel like a good ride to me. In the past, a 60% might have been a very good ride. I think today's scores tend to more accurately reflect what is happening in the dressage arena, and I am glad of it.

But to answer the original poster's question more directly, let me tell you what the Dutch say about a "good score." It will require me telling you a little bit about the Dutch showing system, so bear with me. I think it is a wonderful system and I wish we would adopt the same structure here in the United States.

Basically, let's say you're just starting out at your very first-ever recognized show. In the Dutch system, the fact that this is your FIRST EVER show means you MUST start at Training Level. And your national score is currently at 0.

So, you ride your first tests.

If you receive a 62% - 65% you get a "win point."

If you receive a 65+% - 68% you get two "win points."

If you receive a 68+% you get three "win points."

If you get 55% - 53%, you get a "lose point."

If you get 53-% - 50%, you get two "lose points."

If you get less than 50%, you get three "lose points."

Okay, so our rider rides two Training level tests and gets a 62% and a 61.5%. Our rider gets 1 point for the first test and 0 points for the second. Our rider's national score is now "1 point at Training Level."

At our rider's second show still at Training level, our rider has improved. She gets a 65.5% and a 66%. Both of those rides are worth 2 points each, so our rider's national score is now "5 points at Training Level."

Once our rider/horse combination has received 5 points at Training Level, they MAY move up to First Level.

Let's say our rider does that. Goes to her first First Level show and bombs. Gets a 54% and a 54.5%. Both of those rides give her a "lose point," so her national score is now "3 points at Training Level," and since she is LESS than 5 points at Training Level, so she MUST return to Training Level.

This time, our rider decides to stay at Training Level a little longer. She does well, and gets more points. Eventually, she has found that her score is "10 points at Training Level." At this point she MUST move up to First Level. She can't hang around at Training Level collecting Blue Ribbons.

And so on ... each test can give you 0 points, win points or lose points. Each level has a "may move up at X number of points and MUST move up at X number of points." And if your rides are consistantly bad at any given level, you MUST move down.

And the definition of good or bad is spelled out for you.

P.S. They had a similar system of show jumping.

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I was at a show last weekend where the judge gave 1 60% the WHOLE DAY!!!! I think a lot of the judging is subjective and I wish it was more on a scale as it is in Europe. Additionally, anymore, I tend to look at what the judge scored the whole class...it sucks, but here in Ohio you can see a pattern...it is like they have set scores they award the movements. Hard to put into words, but we have seen it a lot lately...

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I think the judge is a huge variable. There is a judge in my area who is particularly known for being an amazing judge, but scoring very low. The first time I showed under her I got a 44%. Yes, you can laugh. After a year of working on my dressage religiously, I showed under her again to get a 61%, which is a VERY generous score for this particular judge. Some judges hand out 60's like it's not a big deal, and sometimes you have to really work for a 60 from a certain judge.

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Well for training level, I like to see above 70% as I know Ocean and I can do it. For other's I'm not sure. And for the numbers, 7's and 8's with an occasional 9 and I'm happy.

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Well I think it depends on how much you've improved before you can move up. For example, my horse is not the best at dressage (but has wonderful gaits) and the previous owner got nothing below a 38 with him (eventing terms...) at Training level. For me, I want to move into training when my scores are consistantly 38 or better at Novice because I know that is a REALLY good score for me and my horse. My best score with Frog is a 33 (in eventing) and then at a dressage show a 68.5%. It really depends on the judge, but I was SO proud of both of those times! Anything from a 38 and below in eventing or a 62% and above in dressage i get REALLY excited lol. Anything below that I know I can do better. [big Grin]

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I consider anything in the mid sixties to be a good score. It's the number I shoot for and am pleased to see.

I recently received a 70% for two intro tests with my pony and we are no longer going to compete intro- it's time to move up.

The pony I rode before he retired helped me snag an 80% in Training 3 a few years ago. We were headed towards First Level, but he retired before we got that far--he couldn't consistantly do the lengthenings.

I do think the judge has a lot to do with scores- some are very generous and some are very stingy.

The judges I got those scores from admitted to me later that they had a soft spot for ponies.

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quote:

Originally posted by Promis Pony:

to me a good score doesnt matter. Just as long as your horse stays in the ring your good
[big Grin]

Lol.. It sounds like you have a story to tell?

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