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SallyQ4

How to keep a saddle from sliding- mutton withers?

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I have a new horse, a paint with a very quarter horsey round barrel, low withers, flat back. I like my saddle but it slips when I mount, no matter how tight- he is 16 hands to boot. We did our first trail ride Saturday- I call it extreme trail riding- no trail, lost leader, deep arroyos, steep rocky hillsides.This poor boy had never been out in the bush- I know he was longing for a groomed arena- I sure was.

Anyway, are there known saddle pads or girths that might keep the saddle from sliding? I needed to get off, then couldn't get back on. At home I use a mounting block or railroad ties.

I'd appreciate any words of wisdom about what works for you! [Not Worthy][Not Worthy]

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Joe has a short back with no withers, I mostly use a Profeesional Choice pad, we tried a rubber backed pad also but I'm a little leary that he might get sore with the rubbing.

A breast collar and a flank girth helps keep the saddle in place and I don't have to tighten the cinch as tight.

I'll be interested to see some other suggestions.

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I'll be watching this post as well. Is this something with Paints? Mine (Shiloh) doesn't have very high withers either and good gosh as tight as I have to cinch up the saddle I feel bad for having to do that.

I tried a neoprene backed pad a couple yrs ago on another horse I just didn't like it. That just doesn't seem "natural" having all that rubber against the horses back. I know she sure sweated a lot with it on, no matter what the temperature was.

One thing I have noticed, it seems I have trouble keeping the Tucker saddle tight no matter what horse I'm using it on. I rarely use it on him for that reason. DANG.....that just about kills me, mentally AND physically [Frown]

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No I got a Paint cross with a warmblood. All I do is trail ride.. I went through about 6 saddle pads with him & alot of money on the different pads.. what I got now is a SMx air Ride Saddle pad I just Love IT & I got a couple of my freinds that had trouble with their horses having sore backs Now have gotten the SMx air RIDE saddle pad & have no trouble now with their horses ( my one freind was only the blanket rug preason ,she got dumped by her horse so many times even with a well fitted saddle) She tried my pad & bought one... Every horse is different.. If U want here is the # to call for info.. on this pad...1(800) 331-9421 My pad that I got was $129.00 & that was shiiping to..

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You could always use a crupper, thats what we do with our mules. If you decided to do this I would tack up your horse and lead him around up and down hills b-4 climbing on. Thats how I broke my 3yr. mule to a crupper. (Hills are when they're going to feel the crupper the most)

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I have a couple Pro Choice air ride pads. I can put the same saddle on my horse with a different pad and it will move when I get on, but with the air ride, it stays put. I purchased mine from ebay and definitely think it was worth the money, which is why I bought another for a spare. I highly recommend it from my own experiences. We also have a new breed pad that my husband use to put under another blanket with his old saddle.

We mostly use neoprene girths with the exception of my mare who has one with wool on the outside for more sensitive skin.

We also ride with a breast collar so if the saddle does slip it won't go all the way under or if the cinch breaks going up a hill there is more of a safety net.

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Unfortunately, I agree with destinedhorselover. I have a short flat backed Haflinger, he's the perfect opportunity for rolling saddles. The one I had made for him could go up or down and sideways (which I do occassionally unplanned) anything without a chest collar or crouper and it will stay in place. Two things I learned in these saddle fitting clinics..first and foremost check for proper fit and second the importance of a secure flank strap.

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Yep I agree with everyone else here. Don't really like idea of neoprene pad. Never saw or tried air ride pad, but sounds good. I love neoprene cinch or girth. Some horses skin reacts poorly to neoprene though. Then you might try felt or wool or horse hair cinch.

Breast collar and flank cinch are a must in my opinion. Or just a breast plate if riding english. For your situation a crupper might also be a must.

When I ride with the breast collar and flank cinch on my western saddle I can leave it quite a bit looser on the front cinch. Same when I ride with breast plate on my english saddle. Even though they aren't really tight the breast plates really add stability to the saddle especially when mounting.

[ 02-13-2008, 12:25 AM: Message edited by: jklucky2001 ]

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You can have the best or most expensive pad in the world, but if it's too thick for that saddle on that horse, or if the saddle doesn't fit to begin with, it's still not going to work right.

Since you say you've tried umpteen pads with no success, I'd be looking real hard at the saddle itself.

A breast collar isn't going to fix the problem either. It's just putting a Band-aid on it.

Think of it this way - you're wearing shoes that don't quite fit right, and you're putting duct tape around them to try to keep them in place, and then you're planning on going hiking. It doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

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I have found a lot of success using a thin neoprene waffle saddle pad for my mutton withered slightly overweight horse. The neoprene will promote sweating, which will help the saddle stay in place. The key is not having too much padding. You should probably start out with a wide tree saddle, and you want to keep as much room as possible between the bars of the saddle. Using a thick saddle pad will take up some of that room which will create a tighter fitting saddle. Tighter fitting, in a bad way. The saddle will feel like it's trying to be balanced on a half filled balloon....kind of squishy and tipsy. Not ideal for good saddle fit. Use a thin saddle pad/blanket.

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Destinedhorselover I haven't tried a lot of pads- I only have two. I use a reinsman contoured with fleece bottom. My other pad is a reinsman tacky=too swayback pad. Obviously the swayback pad is not appropriate- fits my sway back JiggyMare. I like the contoured because it gives so much clearance at the withers, no wrinkles. The tacky-too seems Ok for not slipping but my mares withers really hold the saddle on. I do not like using the neoprene because I live in a hot climate- and Jiggymare sweats lots.

My saddles are "7/8 nylon/leather half breed with stainless steel dees". I have two abettas, both purchased with high withered horses in mind. One is a "quarter horse wide flex tree", which is really wide. They are described on this web site: www.horsetack.com.

The sweat marks on my Mikey are even with the quarter horse tree on the Playday model. Better than either of the horses the saddles were purchased for. He showed no signs of soreness after our really strenuous ride. But he doesn't like to be girthed up. I just got him a few weeks ago, and his previous owner girthed him up really tight. I have a woven style girth, not neoprene.

Since Mikey was a free horse, and seems to be a keeper, I wouldn't mind buying a new saddle for us this year.

I do not have any photos yet, don't know how to post them anyway. But I had thought that this saddle fits him better than my TB, or slightly swayback mare, who both have hollows behind the wither.

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I have this problem with one of my horses as well and working on solving it. I have experienced the saddle slip in four saddles on her- dressage, hunt, circle y trail and syd hill australian. She's just built that way. I am experimenting with pads. I hope to learn more from you all here.

These are suggestions I have gotten and use with some success:

1- Once you set the saddle on, pull the pad up into the hollow along the spine.

2- start with your saddle off center to the off-side; then, when you mount, it will shift into position (this works the first time, but not for the off-on stuff along the trail).

3- I have always girthed up slow, but with this issue have taken to alternating sides for tightening, so that I don;t inadvertantly pull the saddle off center torwards me.

Other suggestions/ tips/ pad recommendations? Do people find the tacky-too pads work? can you layer them under another pad? does layering worsen slip?

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Just a word of caution on the neoprene. While on a trail ride with my saddle club once, somebody had one on their mare and her back blistered from it really bad. She looked like someone had laid a waffle iron on her. Poor thing. They couldn't ride her for quite a while after. (I can't remember exactly how long, but they were still talking about it at the next meeting)

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I use a no-sweat vent pad on our Rocky Mountain horses. They come in many styles and they do allow air to circulate. They are thin enough to use under a regular blanket which will keep it clean longer. After riding just rinse it off and air dry. I believe the company was "Dixie Midnights", but I am sure other brand names are available by now. Do a Google search. They last forever!! Good luck!

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All of the folks who said you've had success with the Professional Choice SMx air RIDE pad .....

Please, if you can, post the exact model number of that pad.

The reason I'm asking you to do this for the original poster is I know there are different styles of SMx air RIDE pads.

_________________________________

A friend of ours has the SMx air RIDE pad that you are probably talking of.

His is a really nice pad. Light weight, a little on the thin side but the thing about it is....

You can not squeeze it together with you finger and thumb and feel either the finger and thumb.

Who ever had sold him that pad had told him that was one of the keys to a good pad.

He said maybe that was a sales gimmick, whether it was or not, he has an awesome pad.

Anyhow ....He went on and on about how much he likes it.

So I went right home and ordered one off Professional Choice's site.

Got it in and it wasn't even close to the one my friend has.

I called Pro.Choice and talked to them and the girl told me that they do have different styles of the SMx air RIDE pad and I needed the number off of my friends pad.

I was able to send it back, but I just wanted peoople to realize that there are different styles of that pad.

[ 02-17-2008, 04:19 AM: Message edited by: noip1963 ]

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Hubby says...

-Make sure you don't have any fly spray or grooming products on the horse's back or girth area. The chemicals can burn the horse under the pad. Plus, it may contribute to the slipping.

-Tacky Pads are very good pads and are vented so they don't overheat (the sweat helps to cool and lubricate). There are companies that make something like Tacky Pads but are not the same (inferior).

-It sounds like you need a thinner pad with good rebound (ex: Tacky Pad).

-It's possible that your girth may be too long. The girth ring should come up to approximately the horse's "armpit" (my word). You can look at pictures of professionals in magazines, and see how it should look. It's better to be a little short than too long.

-Try mounting from the offside to see if the saddle moves the same.

...More later - we have to go grocery shopping. [Wink]

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I experienced this problem for a few years, I tried every pad I could get my hands on including neoprene and tacky. I switched to wool, I can now practically hang off the side of my horse. I thought for a while it was saddle fit but I have a tucker and a big horn and both will roll without the wool pad and have had my horse professionally fitted. So if you can get a hold of a wool pad, cost about $100, give it a try, you might be pleasantly surprised.

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I would say...

Pull your saddle pad up after you put your saddle on at the withers...like Pooperscooper suggested. I use this for ALL my horses and I get kinda upset when other people don't do this...it gets all that pressure off the withers and gives the horse a more natural feel.

Could you use a split pad?...one that is split at the withers? [Confused]

Becca

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You could try a supra cinch from www.crestridgesaddlery.com that is what I use on my mutton withered mule it works great you have to get it two inches larger than the girth you use now so if you have a 30 inch you will need a 32 and so on.They are a packers cinch and look like a X so its like a front girth and back girth in one but only better.try oneand you will be hooked and won't never use a regular cinch again. [Wink]

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Thank you guys for all the replies. Yesterday I put my husbands cheap no-name leather saddle on with the same reinsman pad- and discovered it stayed put! Not sure if it is the narrower tree, and I didn't ride enough to see sweat marks to check fit. Now I want a leather saddle- but maybe it was the ancient girth, or the canvas strap to the girth. Anyway very curious.

I personally tend to not like the extreme sweating my mare does with a tacky pad- seems like they retain heat to me. I have other horsepeople who like their neoprene girths- very popular with english riders- so I may try that, The supra-cincinch also looks intrigueing for extreme rides.

Any saddle recommendations for low withered roound backs? For trails that is?

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