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Ingesting baling twine??

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Just need a few opinions to soothe my worried mind.... I've been free feeding grass hay to one of my mares that can tend to be a bit of a hard keeper. I've just been throwing a bale of hay out there, picking out the baling twine as she eats the hay away, then giving her another bale a few days later when she eats it all. My concern is, I've heard from some people that horses will sometimes accidentally ingest the baling twine, but I've heard from others that horses dont do that. Just to make myself feel better last night, when I threw her new bale of hay over the fence, I went ahead and cut the twine off and left the bale loose. What is your opinion on this? Should I continue to do this just to be on the safe side, or will this cause her to gobble her food too fast?? [Confused] Am I just worrying about nothing?

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I've always been told, and I have noticed that the horses will not eat the twine. They are very picky eaters, and can tell it is not their grass hay. I have seen horses spit out numerous things that they don't like or realize is not food. I would say they are just fine, still take out any twine you see. But they will usually not eat it.

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I would not leave the twine on. If you're worried about her eating too fast, then put the hay in a hay net. They're cheap and will give you a little peace of mind.

RIDE ON!

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Well...I have seen it with my own eyes! A mare at my barn was being groomed by her owner and she noticed something orange hanging out of her butt..she genty pulled and out came the baling twine!! It was still knotted!So yes, some will eat it!!

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Guess it depends on the horse but mine just chews it like bubblegum! i will find a slobbered up ball of twine in her stall if I accidentally leave one in the hay...but I usually just take it out anyway...you never know.

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I would just cut the twine after you put it down, and then just toss it in the garbage. That should do the trick. I even pick out the little inch peices I find every now and then.

[ 07-20-2006, 08:55 PM: Message edited by: VICKLYNN45 ]

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I'd definitely remove the twine when you throw it in. As well as ingestion, there's also the danger of getting tangled in it. I've seen horses get it caught in their shoes, around their fetlocks, etc., so it's better to be safe!

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I don't know if horses ingest baling twine, if they did, I would think that it could cause colic. But we had a freak accident. One of my mares started drooling badly and letting water run out of her mouth. Food was falling out, it just wasn't pretty. At first, I thought choke, but I looked into her mouth and her tongue was all but cut off. The vet thought possibly twine. I always picked up twine before, but now I really worry about it.

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I'd take it off. It's not worth the chance that she "may" or "may not" eat it. Use hay nets or just put a flake or two out at a time.

Good luck.

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quote:

Originally posted by rockin' robin:

I'd definitely remove the twine when you throw it in. As well as ingestion, there's also the danger of getting tangled in it. I've seen horses get it caught in their shoes, around their fetlocks, etc., so it's better to be safe!

I second that. I have seen horses and cows with it tangled around their legs. Then if they step on it with the other hoof, it tightens and eventually you have a mess on your hands.

I would take it off the bale.

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I am pretty good about getting the twine out when I toss out a bale, but once in awhile I miss one and they don't eat it. But I don't want to take the chance.

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....I've kind of wondered the same thing and so never leave twine in with them.

My concern was always that they could get tangled in it....kinda scary to think that some even EAT the stuff [Eek!]

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Don't know why I'm suddenly thinking about shishkabobs....

[Question]

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quote:

Originally posted by Cactus Rose:

....I've kind of wondered the same thing and so never leave twine in with them.

My concern was always that they could get tangled in it....kinda scary to think that some even EAT the stuff
[Eek!]

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.

.

.

Don't know why I'm suddenly thinking about shishkabobs....

[Question]

[Eek!] Shishkabobs!!??? How in the heck did we go from baling twine to shishkabobs?? [Razz]

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There was a mare up at the equine center they did colic surgery on and low and behold they took out a wad of bailing twine..it looked like an old mop head. Totally gross and a couple days later she died from complications. So please remove the string before you feed hay.

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quote:

Originally posted by Horseshoe:

There was a mare up at the equine center they did colic surgery on and low and behold they took out a wad of bailing twine..it looked like an old mop head. Totally gross and a couple days later she died from complications. So please remove the string before you feed hay.

[Eek!] Wow. Will do.

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quote:

Originally posted by rockin' robin:

I'd definitely remove the twine when you throw it in.

Me too. I would never take the chance.

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Yes, old topic. But, I never, ever leave baling twine in the pasture. If you must throw out a whole bale, cut the twine and remove it from the pasture.

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Holy smokes, please take the twine away/off. Even on round bales.

With that said, Ive been known to make hay nets out of the twine and they work quite well.

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I agree, take it off when you bring it out. where i board one of the owners horses would chew on it constantly, as the hay was stacked along the fence of the field and also butted up against the pasture, so she would stand there and chew it until it broke then try and eat it, so all in all never leave twine in any way around horses.

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This completely freaked me out and I spent the entire morning making sure there's not one drop of bailing twine anywhere near my pasture.

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