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Katie8758

Turnout issue - advice please

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I'm sure by now you all know my horse Rocky. Well - he is receiving full board at a nice stable the only thing is that they will not turn your horse out for you. If you want your horse turned out, you have to do it yourself. So I've done just that. I turned Rocky out into their large pasture. There was only one other horse in the pasture at the time - a large draft breed. I introduced them over the fence yadda-yadda-ya and then I put Rocky in the pasture with the other horse. Rocky started running around the pasture, rolled a couple of times, put his nose together with the other horse a couple of times, and then finally stopped to eat some grass. As I walked away from the fence, he started Running up and down the fence line because I was leaving (which kinda made me feel good).

Anyways - I went to the barn this afternoon to check on him. A few people from the barn had told me that when they arrived this morning and Rocky saw them - He actually tore the gate down and ran back to his stall. I am now left with the impression that my horse had been trying to get out of the pasture and back to his stall all night long.

What's up??????? Why would he act that way? This is the first time he's done anything like this. Could it be that he didn't want to leave his buddy in the stall next to him? What should I do? I feel that horses shouldn't be kept in stalls 24/7 - just my opinion. My first thought is that I need to turn him out with his stable-buddy. Only problem is that the owner of that particular horse is hardly ever there and I'm certainly not going to turn their horse out with mine without their permission. Do you have any suggestions for a good solution?

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You only have their word for why he acted as he did. Do you have time when you can just go and hang out and see how he acts in the pasture? Was he the only horse out there at the time? There could be more going on than you realize. And if this is the first time that he's been out in that pasture, then yes, he could be wanting to get back to his stall. He views his stall as a safe place.

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Easiest solution is to turn him out with his buddy, like you said. Any chance you could get permission from the other owner?

Other than that, best advice I can think of is to move him to a stall next to a horse that is turned out in the pasture. Let him buddy up with his neighbor and then try to turn him out with the neighbor.

[ 11-16-2006, 12:03 PM: Message edited by: Little Cow ]

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I would talk to his stable buddy's owner and ask if you guys can rotate turning the two horses out together. Maybe one turns them out in the morning, and the other of you puts them back in the evening, or you rotate days, or something like that.

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I'll certainly try to talk to the owner of the horse next to him (his buddy!) about turning them out together. And yes, he was turned out with another horse at the time, said hello to him, and went about his business.

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Personally, if he "did" tear down a gate to get get to his "buddy" horse, I certainaly would not encourage his "buddy" behavior by turning them out together.

If I were you I would demand that the boarding facility get horse safe fences that can not be torn down. And he will eventually get used to being by himself.

Can I ask why you are boarding somewhere that does not do turn out for you? To me that seems to defeat the purpose of boarding a horse. [Confused]

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Katie, I've got no advise for ya...other than I so feel your frusteration there girl.

I got so stressed about lack of turn out last year that I was begging for them to let me turn my horse out with the dang goat! Anything, pleeeaaaasssee let me turn my horse out!

Good luck Katie! [Huggy]

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