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HellzBellz

his heads to high

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i have been riding and looking after my friends horse whilst she is at college, as she cant get down to see him because she is living at the campus. She wanted me to train him whilst she is away, so she can show him when she gets back.

anyway he has a habit of throwing his head up in the air, especially in the trot and canter and when were jumping. It can be very annoying and at times quite dangerous.

i want to know if there is any way i can try and get him to put his head down, he is completely sound and there is nothing wrong with him as hes been vet checked so he isnt in any pain.

i also cant use a martingale or anything on him as his owner doesnt want me to use one on him and asked me to find a different way, but i have ran out of ideas at the moment and i need some fresh advise.

he may just be being naughty as he is quite strong and bargy anyway and can be quite cheeky. But i really do need to find a way to fix this as he is a very large horse and its starting to get a bit dangerous.

any help would be appreciated

[ 03-23-2008, 07:42 PM: Message edited by: JumpingHigh ]

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i have been riding and looking after my friends horse whilst she is at college, as she cant get down to see him because she is living at the campus. She wanted me to train him whilst she is away, so she can show him when she gets back.

anyway he has a habit of throwing his head up in the air, especially in the trot and canter and when were jumping. It can be very annoying and at times quite dangerous.

i want to know if there is any way i can try and get him to put his head down, he is completely sound and there is nothing wrong with him as hes been vet checked so he isnt in any pain.

i also cant use a martingale or anything on him as his owner doesnt want me to use one on him and asked me to find a different way, but i have ran out of ideas at the moment and i need some fresh advise.

he may just be being naughty as he is quite strong and bargy anyway and can be quite cheeky. But i really do need to find a way to fix this as he is a very large horse and its starting to get a bit dangerous.

any help would be appreciated

[ 03-23-2008, 07:42 PM: Message edited by: JumpingHigh ]

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So, he's flipping his head, not just holding it too high?

That can actually be a lot of different things- anything from the bit being uncomfortable or painful (if it's a regular snaffle, try one with an extra joint, then try a mullen, experiment a little), his teeth needing to be done (though you said he was vet checked, so that may not be the issue), sun sensitivity (look up "photic headshaking" on google), or an actual neurotic response.

Or, it could be that he's just resistant to contact and is reacting to how you're riding him in some way. Sometimes horses can get snatchy if the rider isn't always perfectly consistent with the contact, or if the horse learns that he can break the contact by tossing his head around. A way to test that is to maintain contact while he tosses his head and offer no relief when he does it, or have a different rider (preferably a competent dressage professional) try him and see what he does.

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So, he's flipping his head, not just holding it too high?

That can actually be a lot of different things- anything from the bit being uncomfortable or painful (if it's a regular snaffle, try one with an extra joint, then try a mullen, experiment a little), his teeth needing to be done (though you said he was vet checked, so that may not be the issue), sun sensitivity (look up "photic headshaking" on google), or an actual neurotic response.

Or, it could be that he's just resistant to contact and is reacting to how you're riding him in some way. Sometimes horses can get snatchy if the rider isn't always perfectly consistent with the contact, or if the horse learns that he can break the contact by tossing his head around. A way to test that is to maintain contact while he tosses his head and offer no relief when he does it, or have a different rider (preferably a competent dressage professional) try him and see what he does.

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hey thanks for your help.

we have tried him in quite a few different bits but he acts the same in all of them. That photic headshaking was really interesting to look at but it isnt very likely that it is that as he doesnt have any of the symptoms apart from the throwing his head up.

he is actually gradually getting better in this past week, ive done alot of work with him on the ground and ive actually been riding him with a bitless bridle and hes been alot better.

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hey thanks for your help.

we have tried him in quite a few different bits but he acts the same in all of them. That photic headshaking was really interesting to look at but it isnt very likely that it is that as he doesnt have any of the symptoms apart from the throwing his head up.

he is actually gradually getting better in this past week, ive done alot of work with him on the ground and ive actually been riding him with a bitless bridle and hes been alot better.

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