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pocobuckgal

declawing cats?

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i am so sorry for this, but i find it barbaric...

in my world, cats have claws, and you deal with it (without removing them)

my cats occationally scratch the furniture, wooden doors and such. i chase them away, and they stay away for some time before they decide to try again... have they left any marks? oh yes, both on me and the house, but to me that is part of having cats.

i am lucky with them though. ?r?ra bites their tails and drags them by the fur on their backs, but they just take it, or simply pull free and move away... (often with ?r?ra sitting there with a handfull of fur..)

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zoey ( the cat) is just playing and yes shy does play rough ( sp?) we are working on the "be NICE to the kitty" thing and showing her the right way to pet the cat but its slow going.

Zoey is 6 months old.

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For indoor cats, I'm for it. I had my two rescues declawed and my other indoor cat came declawed. I ended up having to declaw the rescues because not only were they tearing up the furniture, they tore up a window sill and were tearing up each other. I kept having to take them to the vet with eye injuries they inflicted on each other. Getting them declawed was the best thing I did for them. Now they can whomp on each other all day and not get hurt. [big Grin]

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We had 2 declawed cats (declawed 16 and 20 years ago), before we realized how cruel it is. Ours were fine and did not suffer the side effects (pain when scratching in the litter box, trouble walking, etc) that some declawed cats have. They went outdoors and killed mice, voles, and even birds despite lack of front claws. However, I would never, ever declaw another cat. I trim my cats' claws and discourage them from scratching furniture. It's not been a problem for me.

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quote:

Originally posted by pocobuckgal:

Zoey is 6 months old.

Yeah, if you can wait her out, she'll calm down. She's just being a kitten, unfortunately. Hopefully the soft paws will help.

One of my cats was declawed before he came to me, and it was great not to have the pinpoints digging in when he kneaded. But I consider cutting off the last digits of each of my fingers and, as others have said, decide that's a little too much for me to do to an animal.

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Aside from the fact that it's illegal here, I honestly can't understand why anyone would declaw a cat. Claws are part of a cat's charm. When it gets snotty, it informs you [big Grin] Whenever I visit my parents, I always end up with little claw marks on my thighs because she paws you (like a horse doing piaffe) before settling down on your lap. I'm always looking around for a blanket to slip between my jeans and her claws. Sometimes you have to inform her that the couch is not a scratch post, and that there is a propper feline one behind the chair. It's fine. I deal. None of their cats have ever ruined furniture or curtains, nor do I know anyone with an adult cat who has had simmilar problems.

Also, I've never heard of a cat being put down because it claws. That's what cats do sometimes. Perhaps that's because we've learned to live without declawing?

[ 02-27-2008, 07:05 AM: Message edited by: Cappuccino_Girl ]

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I only have had one that had a declawing procedure, and that was on a have-to-do basis. She's a polydactyl and had additional claws growing from the bone through the center of her paws that were curling back into the pads of her feet and causing a massive infection.

Other than that, no way. I'll deal with the scratched furniture, gives it character [Wink]

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Eugh. It's a disgusting practice that makes me feel a little sick to think of.

I agree with whoever it was that said if you demand your cat be declawed, you shouldn't own it in the first place. It either shows an ignorance which shouldn't go with pet ownership or complete disregard for an animal's welfare and happiness (or a bit of both).

I've had 3 cats, and they've all been free to come and go as you please. Where I live, it's almost unheard of to have an 'indoor' cat - I think the whole thing is unnatural and I would never prevent my cat from going outdoors. Just the fact people with indoor cats complain about them escaping indicates to me that they WANT to be outdoors, poor things. Keeping them cooped up is an alien practice to me.

If I lived on a busy road with a high risk for getting a cat run over, I wouldn't get one, simple as.

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quote:

Originally posted by skjotta:

quote:

Defense against what? The sofa? The door frame?

babies and children?

Against people in general for that matter. I know I do stuff my cat doesn't like sometimes.

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quote:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Originally posted by skjotta:

quote:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Defense against what? The sofa? The door frame?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

babies and children?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dogs, other cats, and yes-children. Personally I think any child (including mine when I have them) that gets scratched by a cat deserves it, if you don't want your child scratched 1) don't have a cat or B) use common sense and don't leave the baby and cat alone together

Not to mention should your cat ever get outside you have now removed it's ability to fight back if someting attacks it AND its ability to climb a tree to escape.

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Yes. I think that would be appropriate.

If the child is too young to understand how to be gentle, then keep kid away from cat or cat away from kid.

Skjotta is lucky with her cat--cat seems to love being yanked on. But most pets don't. And at some point, they have to learn NOT to do that. I'm not sure declawing the cat is really the best bet--likely the kid is going to get bitten too.

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Well, I would live with scratched furniture anyday. Just yank out all your toe nails and finger nails...

I know of several cats that were declawed? There was blood everywhere you looked for at least 2 months. I dont think thats Humane at all. But thats my biased opinion. But to take an animals only way of defense away from them? I think its cruel in a way.

However on the flip side, If you know without a doubt that the cat is not going to encounter and sort of thing that would endanger the thing? Sure, declaw it. As long as its going to be in a safe enviroment.

[ 02-29-2008, 11:46 AM: Message edited by: Flying Stars ]

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My husband and I found a stray kitten this summer and I couldn't bring myself to declaw her. She has never offered to claw anyone, she has her scratch tree, and she doesn't claw the furniture anymore. She does however climb up the back of the couch [Duh] , but it is old and against the wall so I really don't care. I am so glad we didn't do that to her. I had worried about her getting out and not able to protect herself from a stray dog.

So my answer is.... I would do anything I could to keep from declawing a cat at any age.

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quote:

Originally posted by pocobuckgal:

and i would go about that how? without locking one or the other up?

Maybe by teaching them both proper behavior and stay with it until the kid doesn't 'attack' the cat... Like every cat owner in Europe have to do. [Wink]

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Originally posted by pocobuckgal:

quote:

and i would go about that how? without locking one or the other up?

I don't see anything wrong with keeping the cat contained in one room when you can't supervise the two of them, especially if you have another cat to leave with her. Just make sure she has plenty of stuff to keep her busy and make sure you set aside some time to socialize with her every day. [Confused]

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De-clawing an outdoor cat is cruel, plain and simple. Outdoor cats need their claws for defense, and, in the case of a completely outdoor cat, for catching food. It makes me sick when people de-claw their cats and then stick them outside with no way of fending for themselves.

On the other hand...

If you have it done as a kitten, and if the cat will remain strictly an indoor animal, I have no problem with it. In fact, I support it. That being said, I should probably add that I see no reason to remove the back claws, only the front. They cannot climb with their back claws only, so I see no reason to remove them. The whole cat-baby/children thing is not even an argument. If you have children and are worried that a cat with claws may scratch them, don't get a cat. If you already have a cat and don't want the same situation to arise, don't have children. Or, it's quite simple, have your cat de-clawed. That being said, the procedure is much harder on an older cat, which is why it should be done while they are kittens.

I have had four indoor cats in my life, and three presently, that were de-clawed. Though, like I said earlier, they were only de-clawed in the front paws. None of them had any sort of reaction to it, and have been absolutely fine. In fact, my kitten who was just recently de-clawed, came home and raced, leaped, and jumped around like normal. It didn't even phase him. And I know it was not a fluke because I have had four cats in the past, and I work at a veterinary clinic where the procedure is performed on a regular basis. I see the cats in recovery and they are absolutely fine. I hate to hear people tell horror stories of "Oh! How it handicapped my cat!" because they are misinformed.

[ 02-29-2008, 03:13 PM: Message edited by: hesacatch ]

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Eugh. Did a bit more research on this. I didn't think about all the joint problems that could arise from declawing, but it makes total sense since it's drastically altering apart of the body the cat uses for moving around. I have a hereditary tendon condition that affects my ankles and therefore my gait, and has a knock on effect on EVERY joint in my legs and hips and spine. It's already given my mum scoliosis and various other problems. This is just a minor gait abnormality and can only be picked up by the doctor with special equipment or by looking at the patterns of wear on my shoes, but it has a MASSIVE affect on the rest of your body.

So it makes sense that declawed cats as young as 2yrs have been known to develop arthritis.

There's also a lot of problems with muscle atrophy, thanks to the fact the cat cannot grip and brace itself with its front paws to stretch etc.

[ 02-29-2008, 03:34 PM: Message edited by: Kyani ]

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quote:

Skjotta is lucky with her cat--cat seems to love being yanked on. But most pets don't. And at some point, they have to learn NOT to do that. I'm not sure declawing the cat is really the best bet--likely the kid is going to get bitten too.


actually i am not lucky. declawing here is illegal. the moment i learned that i was preagnant we started preparing the cats for the baby. both cats can be lifted from the skin anywhere on their body without offering claws. we do this regulary, and always reward them well for not fighting.

they KNOW that if they want the attention they get from us, they have to live with a bit of "abuse" but they are ALWAYS free to leave, and they do. the moment the do not want to be pulled, they just leave. we have never "forced" them to show claws towards us, by always letting them go immediately when they want to.

cats are as trainable as dogs (oki, maybe not completely, but that is because of independence, not intelligence)

Knuteline LOVES ?r?ra. i think it is her mother instincts. every time ?r?ra cries, Knuteline runs over to comfort by rubbing up against her and licking her toes... i love my kitties.... Knut stays away most of the time, but every now and then he to have to come over and lay across her lap or rub his head against her, just to prove that he is part of her family to (or maybe i should say that she is part of HIS family [Wink] ....

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I was just saying Skjotta that if a cat weren't to tolerate that behavior it would be normal. You're lucky.

I have a dog who will let the kids climb all over him, pull on him, whatever.

But my friends have a child and when she was younger they had a dog that WASN'T so keen about things like that and they taught their daughter NOT to do it.

She got nipped maybe once. Dog got in trouble. But so did kid.

[Confused]

Generally speaking I would say that yanking/pulling/pinching an animal is unacceptable. If one tolerates it great. But it is weird to me to accept the behavior.

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buddyroo - shy does NOT get away with it. but she is only 16 months old. has to be done every day or she just doesn't get it.Zoey will climb in the crib and play pen and try to play with Shy. then Zoey gets in TROUBLE.

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quote:

Originally posted by Kyani:

If I lived on a busy road with a high risk for getting a cat run over, I wouldn't get one, simple as.

So should everyone who lives near a busy road not get a cat? What do you plan o ndoing with the thousands and thousands of cats who live in the city? Euth them all because heaven forbid they cant roam the streets?

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quote:

So should everyone who lives near a busy road not get a cat? What do you plan o ndoing with the thousands and thousands of cats who live in the city? Euth them all because heaven forbid they cant roam the streets?

no, but if you live in an area where the cat can not go out, count on getting your furniture scratched. OR be aware that there is a good chance the cat gets run over...

if you buy a horse, you have to be aware that is is an expencive animal, right?

well, if you get a cat, you have to aware that it has claws....

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