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AnnShh

New Farrier... what do you think?

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Last Summer (June I think) I posted a thread w/ pics of my gelding's hooves for a critique. Well, since then, the farrier has been let go and we have gotten a new farrier into the barn. She came reccomended by my trainer/BM and also by the local equine rescue. To me, I thinks he did a much better job on my gelding's hooves than the previous farrier but I wanted to see if you all agreed. I'd appreciate it if you guys took a look at the pics in the previous thread (link included below) and tell me what you think about this new trim compared to the old one.

Here's the previous thread- there are pics in the first couple of posts:

http://forums.horsecity.com/cgi-bin/bb/ult...t=022141#000012

Keep in mind that she's probably trying to fix a lot of stuff that wasn't done with the other farrier... but in general, I think they look much better. This is only his first trim by the new farrier. They look healthier to me as well. Sorry for the bad quality pics... it's the best I could do today but I can try to get more shots if you need them on Monday. *The frogs have mud on them.... I should have brushed that off before I took the pics but wans't thinking... just ignore that!*

Left Front:

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Left Front 2:

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Left Hind (the farrier always left flares on his hinds... so I think she's trying to fix that- which is why it still looks a bit flared to me):

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Left Hind 2:

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Right Front:

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Right Front 2:

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Right Hind (he had a bad horizontal crack in his hoof over the summer which has just about grown out):

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Right Hind 2:

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[ 12-09-2007, 12:58 AM: Message edited by: AnnShh ]

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To me the trim quality is about the same as your previous post in June.

The heels are still too high. I would like to see more taken off the quarters to take the leverage off the flaring and control the chipping that is present.

However, it really isn?t fair to judge a trim job without seeing before and after shots on the day of the trim. A hoof can change a lot in a week and a half.

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i was about to say the heals seemed so much longer than the sole... but then trimmer said what i was thinking.. the toes also seem a little sharp... maybe that isnt the right words??

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They look...ummm...OK....I can tell that someone has trimmed them.

A horse owner once showed me a horse and told of the shoes being on for 4 weeks... [shocked] ....looked more like they had been on for 18 weeks,and when put on the hoof was not cut back [Eek!]

I think to compare the farrier's one would need a picture of last farriers work at 1 week and a few days.

take a picture 1 week 1/2 after next trim then post back.

most all of the chips and flares should be able to be trimmed away on the next visit.

hooves are living and are growing as I type so they will never be perfect,like if we carved them out of wood [big Grin]

I think a trim every 4-5weeks right or somewhat wrong is better than nothing at all.

If the rest of your horse looks like the feet I bet you really enjoy your mount [Wink]

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I know that his heels are still pretty high.... but do you think that the farrier is trying to take him down slowly or something? I don't know much about trimming so I don't know if that's something that needs/should be done gradually or not.

The old farrier we used left the heels high on everyone... there is a mare at the barn who had really bad feet... but the guy sounded convinced that there was nothing wrong with them- she started with the new farrier about 1/2 way though the summer and her feet look much better. I believe the new farrier was correcting everything on her feet gradually... but I don't know the details or anything.

Next time I'll try to get pics of before/after the day of the trim.... but since I'm 16 I couldn't get out of school that day and my BM held him for the farrier for me.

See to me, from looking at the pics from the old farrier vs the new farrier, I do see how the heels are long in both sets of pics, but in the after pics, to me it looks like there is a lot less flare and the hooves are just healthier in genearl. I know the trim isn't perfect, maybe not even great but I do think it looks better... like... she's trying to fix everythign slowly rather than in one trim.

The farrier is out about every 5-6 weeks... I'm hoping to be able to make it to the next trim so that I can get before/after pics the day of.

ETA- the pics in the link I included in the first post (of the old farrier's trim) were taken 1.5 weeks after the trim. The pics in this post were also taken 1.5 weeks after this trim. I don't know if that makes a difference or not.

[ 12-09-2007, 05:07 PM: Message edited by: AnnShh ]

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The new pictures look better..no question..there is still alot of room for improvement. Take pictures as soon after the next trim as you can..I alredy see enough excess wall that I would trim him again before he chips out and cracks...

Excess wall = flairs and stress on the white line...Get it down and bevel it up. Id worry about that over anything wit the heels first.

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Thanks!

I'll get pics as soon as possible after the next trim. With any luck maybe it will be on a day I have off or something so that I can be there for before and after pics... but I could always go out the afternoon the day before and day of the trim if needed.

As long as there is *some* improvement then I'm happy. When I first started using the old farrier I was happy with him because my horse was sound afterwards (previous, previous farrier (lol) trimmed him and made him sore afterwards every time)... but I noticed that his trims got incresingly worse. He was let go because he never showed up on time (ie: he'd be there 3 hours later than when scheduled) but even before he was let go the barn started transfering horses to the new farrier because of the fact that her trims were much better than the old farrier's.

Hopefully all it will take is some time with this new farrier (who does seem to do a good job with the other horses) to get my gelding's feet looking how they should.

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I've seen worse trims, but theres definitely a lot of room for improvement.

One good thing is that the farrier isn't rasping into the toe callous; great, since that would be counter-productive with a barefoot horse. They are also taking off some of the flared wall, another good thing (although theres room for improvement there as well).

By leaving the excess hoof wall at the quarters its going to encourage flaring in that area. Which is counter-productive, since the farrier is clearly trying to get rid of the flare by removing it from the outside. So in conjunction with that they need to follow the live sole (with a knife; I find thats the easiest way) at the quarters and remove the excess, then bevel the edge.

The heels really bother me though, this horse has good feet with the potential to be great feet. But with heels that high its not going to happen. You do need to take the heels down gradually to a certain extent; follow the live sole. Right now theres plenty of heel to remove (underrun by the look of it) before you would hit the live sole.

JMO [smile]

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My horse's heels looked a lot like yours recently because I was afraid of making him sore and was taking them down gradually. I was instructed to trim them to within a credit card's thickness of the frog...as long as the frog is healthy. I was leary about this, but followed the instructor's advice and my horse's feet are VERY much better. He was not sore afterward at all. I think the heels are too long...first thing I noticed.

Also, with the flares, it is best to remove them completely so that the new tubule growth does not emulate the old tubule growth. Does that make sense?

It also looks to me like the toes have been "bull-nosed" or dubbed. They should not be rasped in that way from the top...very undesirable.

And definitely want to get those chips and cracks under control...I speak from experience. I'll include a picture of a crack gone wild in my horse's foot (this is after the vet cut away at it to remove the debris that had accumulated). Believe me, an ounce of prevention is worth a bzillion pounds of cure.

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I got a new trimmer after this "event." Now, looking back, I'm embarassed that I employed the trimmer I used as long as I did.

My best advice is to educate yourself on trimming as much as possible. There are lots of resources. Read all you can so that you can look at nearly any foot and "pick it apart."

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