Sign in to follow this  
Trimmer396

Are you prepared for your farrier/trimmer???

Recommended Posts

Here?s the scenario.

Got a call from a lady that I didn?t know, asking ?Can you trim my horse??

Sure. What day?

?It has to be tomorrow?

How is he with his feet?

?He is great with his feet. You won?t have any problems trimming him.?

(After some apprehension) I say yes. But I can?t be there for more than an hour.

?No Problem?

See you tomorrow.

When I showed up I was told that she just had to catch her horse, and she will be right back. So I waited. After a few minutes I decided to check on her progress.

She was in the middle of the pasture with a can of grain, and a halter chasing this horse around. I watched for about 10 minute before offering my help. It took the two of us the better part of an hour to get this horse caught. She got the horse tied up, and said I don?t know why he is so hard to catch all the time. I asked why she didn?t have him caught earlier. No reason, just didn?t think it was necessary. What! She knew what time I was going to be there, she knew that I could only be there an hour. I was a little peeved. [bang Head]

She seemed genuinely shocked when I handed her a bill for a farm call. Then told her she would have to reschedule, because I don?t have time to trim her horse. What did she expect? Was I wrong? [Confused] At least I helped catch the horse.

What do you do to prepare for your farrier/trimmer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow that really sucks. I would have done the same thing given the situation. To prepare for my farrier i usually throw my horses in their stalls about half an hour before he is schedualed to be here and give them hay. Pick out their feet while they are eating and let them be till he gets here to trim. That way they have some cool down time if they were a little wired in the pasture or anything. And that way the farrier can get right to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my farrier/trimmer and take very good care of her [Wink]

Horses are caught well before she arrives. Their hooves are picked and brushed clean. If legs are muddy/wet, they're cleaned and dried.

I have a level, cleared, well-lit area for her to work in. The extension cord is plugged in and waiting (since she uses an electric hand grinder).

I hold the horse and assist when asked. Trimming is usually about 20 minutes per horse. I then offer a drink to match the temperature. Pay her in cash. Give a gift at holiday/birthday or any time I feel the urge.

I also keep my mares on a very tight trimming schedule: every 4 weeks in spring/summer and every 5 weeks during fall/winter. Since they're drafties, this keeps all flaring under control and makes less work for her.

In addition, I make sure both mares are absolute angels about their feet. My Percheron was a challenge in the beginning. In between farrier visits, I spent time every day making sure she learned that leaning was unacceptable, that she really could balance all 2,000 pounds of herself on 3 legs and that standing still was the Done Thing.

I want DJ around for a long time. [big Grin]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He is always there on the dot. I LOVE IT!! so i usually have them tied up and brushed. Try to clean off the hoofs to.

Only once i was late but he didn't get out of his truck til I got there and by the time he got all his stuff out i was ready.(like 2 min.)

I think you did the right thing for giving her the farm call bill. You TOLD her you only had an hour and she agreed it would be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trimmer, no I don't think you were wrong to charge the farm call. You told her you could only be there an hour.

I bet she doesn't reschedule. I also bet her horse does not stand all that great for trimming. ...just a hunch! [Razz]

I have my two haltered and eating hay if it's winter. In the summer they are usually hiding in the barn from the flies, so they aren't going anywhere!

Both mine are easy to catch, if they are outside, so I don't lock them in or anything.

I don't always clean out their feet ahead of time. [Embarrassed] But, if they are really dirty, I do clean them up a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO, owners should:

-have horse caught and if wet out, sufficiently early so that the horses legs are n't all muddy/wet.

-have done ample preparation so that the horse is willing and trained to pick up feet.

-have a well lit, level workspace with sufficient room to move around the horse (I know it's not always possible--but for example, if your lighting is bad, schedule during the day when there's light)

-have fly spray handy as needed

-be realistic about your horse's condition and behavior. If you tell a farrier that your horse was done 4 weeks ago, they're going to KNOW you lied when they arrive to 16 weeks worth of growth. It's more work and it's not good for your horse. Just be honest. Similarly about behavior. If you don't normally pick out your horse's feet or haven't had a farrier there in a year, how do you know how your horse behaves? Just be honest.

Most farriers will do jsut about any horse as long as they have planned the time and know what they're getting into. I think that "surprises" should cost extra.

Basically, IMHO, those are the bare essentials.

As a note to farriers:

-please be on time or call if you're going to be late.

-please work efficiently and save the gabbing for when you aren't holding my horse's feet. They do have a somewhat limited attention span...so get them done, then we can chat.

-if you want/need/expect me to do something differently, please let me know.

-if you shoe, please use a magnet to help find the nails. I don't shoe....so I don't typically have use for one.

Food for thought: If your farrier only charged about half the normal trim but came out every 3-4 weeks instead of every 6-8, would you do it? I would rather have my horses closer to "perfect" all the time than let them get long. It's harder on them. And, it's more work.

So....if it ended up costing you roughly the same, would you do that?

And farriers, would you offer such a thing?

I normally get mine done every 4 weeks from spring through fall and every 5-6 when the growth slows down in the winter. I guess they could go longer, but it's not optimum functionality at tha point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horses are always caught, hooves cleaned, blankets OFF, and a spot in the garage cleared out (with lights of course) before the farrier arrives. If the horses act up, I've always got a chain in my pocket, and a some extra money for his trouble.

Oh, and I'm used to my farrier always coming like, 45 mins earlier than he tells me...so I catch horses an hr before the scheduled time [Crazy]

It's only common sense that you be ready when the farrier arrives, unfortunately, not everyone has common sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The majority of the time I am not able to be there in person when my trimmer comes, so my barn owner has her put away in a stall early before my trimmer even arrives.

When I am able to be there, I have my horse out probably at least an hour before the trimmer gets there, and have her groomed, feet picked out and clean, and she is also played with to encourage better behavior. [smile]

Buddy: Callie is done every 5 weeks plus or minus a few days depending on when my trimmer is able to make the trip to the barn

[ 12-16-2007, 07:00 PM: Message edited by: Dhec4Christ ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must admit that because i am in highschool full time my horse is out in a pasture when my farrier arrives. Thankfully he is a very dear friend and my mare adores him. She will leave her hay and trot up to him.

She also ground ties while being shod so nobody has to hold her.

I always add an extra $35 to his check because I really appreciate what he does.

If my mares were hard to catch or wouldn't stand, I would never ask someone to catch them nor would I use up their time trying to catch my horse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I?m not expecting too much. I felt so put out by her disregard for me and my time. [Mad] I couldn?t believe that anyone could be that rude.

I would love to have everyone that has posted as clients. Most of my clients treat me really well, some better than others, but they are all fair. I have has couple forget about me, luckily I knew them well enough I just caught the horse trimmed it and left a note with a bill. Then waited for the OMG I?m so sorry phone call. Which I don?t mind, because it only took 5 minutes to get the horse, and we probably would have talked for longer than that. [big Grin]

I?m glad to hear that everyone is treating there farriers/trimmers with respect.

[Not Worthy]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A LOT of the farriers here are now wanting you to haul to them! I usually don't mind, but now I have 3 head and a 2 horse trailer, so that makes things more complicated. And its usually a 30+ mile trip too...

I always have my horses caught and ready, and have worked with all my horses so they are well behaved... but being horses I'm ready with the stud chain if necessary. Now if only the farriers were all patient with the weanlings! I've had a few times I've had to undo things that have been taught during their trimming session.

But I'm still hoping I'm getting my Pete Ramey dvd's for Christmas! [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I go to my clients place, and my price reflects that. Fuel is a crazy pain right now.

Trimmer, I think you did the right thing- I would have done the same thing.

THe thing that peeves me is clients that bring out a horse that is hungry at dinner time- feed before i come!! Or one that feeds while Im trying to trim, feeds endless treats, et cetera. They need to concentrate on standing on 3 feet, not food!

Sounds to me like you all treat your farriers with respect and care!!! That is so awesome to see! I love all my clients and go above and beyond for them when they need it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey palomino... where are you at in Oregon? I'm so NOT happy with farrier work over this way! Of course, living in the middle of nowhere (Burns) has a bit to do with that, LOL!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is totally unfair of her. I probably would have charged a VERY steep farm call bill. [Razz] But that's just me.

When my farrier comes:

I'm ALWAYS always there.

Horse is caught

I hold the horse

Hooves are picked out

I pay him in cash right away

What he does:

I know he would pick up his trimmings, except that we're on gravel when he's trimming so. I know he does because he does it for the neighbors when he is using their crossties (they have concrete that he can sweep)

He is almost always on time. If he's going to be late or can't come, he calls

He has a reasonable price

And most important he does a good job. [Crazy]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two different farriers as one horses is a one barn and two are at another. (and the trip isn't possible for one farrier, but they're brothers) So, what I do is different. The one horse I do pretty much nothing unless I happen to be there and I make sure he stays in the barn. The barn help grabs the horses for farriers and we get left bills. He is well behaved so I am completely useless, but if he wasn't then I would be there every time to hold him.

For my other two they are pasture horses and I do have to be out there. He is really awesome about calling the day before he is scheduled to do them and is usually right on time. If he is going to be late, he calls. I get out there and catch them and make sure they're in. They easy peasy to catch. Clean them up a bit and they're usually well behaved. (they get a nudge every once in a while but that is your extent of it) I write the check while he schedules the next visit and thats it. Really have never had a problem, I like it that way. Happy farrier, happy feet, happy horses, happy owner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My horses are always caught and in a stall when the farrier arrives. With my older mare, she is normally caught, depending on what time he's coming, about a half hour before hand. If she's really muddy her legs get wiped down. With my filly, since her farrier normally comes earlier in the day, she spends the night inside. Both of my horses are expected to stand and be good. My older mare anyone could hold her. Last time my farrier was out I was sick, so I sat on a bucket and held the mare, she never moved an inch. The filly isn't quite as well behaved yet, but she is use to standing in the cross ties and having people pick up her feet. I noticed today when she was trimmed she didn't like it when the farrier pulled her feet forward to put on his tripod thing. That is something I will now need to work on with her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I carry my horses to be shod to the farrier. The ride seems to help out all horses young and old.

The clients I trim for are pretty good to me also.

One barn owner will not let farriers do work unless horse owner is there [Confused] not good for my time..sometimes..Thats cool,They own it [Roll Eyes]

Trimmer is the "396" big block chevy stuff?

I always try to do new horses on a day that time is not a big deal so that things go as needed.

also,I have never left a horse not trimmed..."knocks on wood"

To be honest I think I would not have trimmed or help catch the horse and left the owner with a little note.

I do leave little notes on receipts like (horse needs feet picked up often) or note: horse moved around. or horse needs tied up dailey

I do see your point if time would have been lost on other horse owners for taking time on new horse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My farrier is amazing and I wouldn't trade him for the world (or his wife for that matter--they are a great pair).

Before he arrives:

--Horse is brought in, blankets/fly mask removed

--Hooves are picked, legs and hooves are brushed/hosed off (depends on weather), towel dried

--Horse is then groomed, checked over, fly spray applied if needed

--Horse is waiting in stall until farrier pulls in driveway (he is then moved from stall to work area and waiting for farrier) with halter on and chain over nose (not used unless needed--yes it can be there and not used--some just need a reminder)

--refreshments are provided and payment is ready

My farrier, who I also board with, has made it very clear to his clients that he will not be responsible for catching horse to have their feet done--it is not his responsibility and it is not in his job description. When he is working on the horses boarded on his property, he will catch them (especially since most of them are done when he had time--phone calls are made to notify owners and times are set up). If there is an issue, another call is made and a time arranged for the owner to be there.

As an owner, I prefer to hold my horse while he had is done. I love the fact that I can ask my farrier any question and get information/answers without having to worry about sounding/feeling stupid. Like I said, I wouldn't trade my farrier for anything. [Jump]

No, you weren't being unreasonable. I also want to second what BRoo said on both accounts of the responsibilities of the owners and farriers/trimmers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Im in eugene area- I can see how burns would be short on farriers..

[ROTFL] Yeah, its short on a LOT of things!

Too bad eugene is still pretty far... I'm trying to arrange for a Bend area person to make the drive over here if we had 10 horses or so to do. Last month I was SO close to hauling to Boise for a trim [Roll Eyes] With fuel that would have been one expensive trim job, LOL!

There are a LOT of horses here, you'd think it would be reasonable to expect a good farrier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My horse is in the barn, groomed, fly sprayed (if needed) and waiting for the farrier when he gets there. If it's around feeding time, I make sure my horse has eaten prior to the farrier getting there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It honestly depends on the farier.

When we make an appointment with Neil, we have the horses inside ready for the farrier, because when he schedules you he actually comes that day.

With George the horses are normally just turned out but we keep a lookout for him, when he pulls in we just go and open the gate and the horses go into their stalls. George doesn't always come on the right day though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always have her caught. Since my farrier/trimmer is always on time i go out about 20 mins or so. I brush her down, have her haltered and do a little bit of lounging and work on her standing and backing. [big Grin]

BTW: Trimmer where at in CO are you?

[ 12-18-2007, 04:50 PM: Message edited by: SoCalDesertRider ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phillp how come you dont do your own horses feet?

Anymore I never have my horses caught up and cleaned up. My farrier is a friend of mine, I will tell her if one is looking due for a trim, and she will fit me in when she can next time she is in the area. She tells me "I will be there in the afternoon" or whenever. Half the time she doesnt even make it that day, so I really dont know when she will be here. I am not goign to make the horses stay in half or all day for nothing. She doesnt mind though, it takes me a minute to bring horsey in and wipe legs and feet with a towel, she grabs a smoke or uses the bathroom while she waits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don?t think I would like to have my clients come to me. In theory it sounds like a good idea. But not everyone has a horse trailer, and some horses aren?t exactly ready to have their feet worked on when they step out of a trailer. Not to mention all my horses are disease and worm free. I wouldn?t want a sick horse brought to my house.

It sounds like some of you guys go above and beyond getting your horses ready. I?m sure it is appreciated. I have to admit that it is nice to work on a groomed horse and it also relaxes them a little too. Yearling can be a challenge, I have found that you can only take as much as their ready to give. You can?t force them, to stand for a long time. If they want there foot back I give it back. This keeps them from feeling trapped, the more comfortable they are with me the longer I can hold their foot up. With our yearlings I am able to start using the hoof jack after the second trim. Gentle and persistent gets you a lot farther than rough and forceful. Their attention span is about the same as my 2yo son.

Phillip, yes the ?396? is big block chevy stuff. I?m a recovering gear head. I don?t have time to work on the old stuff anymore. Besides my 05 dodge gets better fuel mileage and a 3500 can carry more weight.

Palomino1978 is right it can be downright impossible to work on a horse that is either hungry or eating.

SoCal, I?m in the Fort Collins area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take mine to him. He has a trailer business so We do it at his place. It is about 2 miles from me.

I brush mine and fly spray them before I put them in trailer. I only have trims since mine are barefoot.

I pay him with cash that day. Also my horses are well trained to stand for him, making it go smooth. After he is done he invites me for the coffee and we sit and chit- chat for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I use the farrier I'm super good to him. I don't always use him because it's really hit and miss. He refuses to keep a book so he never knows when horses should be due for a trim.

So when I figure they're going to need a trim I call three weeks in advance. It will take that long for him to call me back. If he ever does.

So when we get ahold of him I'll offer pretty much whatever it takes. I'll drive to his place or I'll meet him somewhere if it's more convenient. I installed a roll out shade on the saddle shed for him so he would have that. I always have my tools handy because it seems that his are constantly breaking or missing.

When I'm looking to have shoes on I buy my own and have them waiting.

Horses are groomed, fed and played with. Overhead fly system is on and a huge jug of cold water waits in the cooler.

Cash gets handed over first as it motivates him to finish the horse he's working on. I've had him leave mid horse before and this seems to stop that.

Course he hasn't done my horses in 6 months as he has never returned my phone calls. I trimmed everyone and it came out to the same price if I figure in the pain killers needed after. [Wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey audrey:)..how are things in your neck of the woods.

I do trim my horses that don't need shoes.I take my trail horse to be shod.

Tacking on shoes correct so the the hoof stays correct as it can be,is something I am not comfortable with at the time.I have tacked nails into the "hoof" but I'll leave that to the pro's for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this