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beautiesboy

Onychomycosis (White line Disease)

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Hi everyone [smiley Wavey]

I have been doing alot of research on White Line Disease, I have'nt been able to find alot of information and or pictures of this.I would really like more information, has anyone had a horse with White Line Disease? How is it caused and how do you treat it?

Thanks for any help [Huggy]

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onychomycosis means a fungal diease of the nail or claw.Denotes the decay of the inner HOOFWALL and the WHITELINE as a result of infection by highly adaptable micro-organisms. A.K.A white line disease;onycholysis.

keeping footing clean along with regular hoofcare helps out.White line can be treated by removeing what can be removed along with adding a topical med. to help heal.

One thing to keep in the back of our minds is that a streachted white line can mean many things, such as seedy toe...founder...

when healing a hoof like this keeping it wrapped will help.

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My understanding is that white line disease is caused by bacteria that gets into a stretched white line.

The white line is the laminae that holds the hoof wall to the coffin bone. It's like velcro.

When a hoof is too long and not properly trimmed, the torque on the hoof causes the hoof to flare, and stretches the laminae (white line) and it separates. The laminae die. Dirt and bacteria, fungus, whatever, gets into the stretched white line and causes the disease.

Proper trimming to keep the hoof from flaring, and to keep the white line from stretching will prevent this.

This is my understanding of it.

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Hi

White line disease-the separation is between the hoof wall and the sole at the white line

The separated area can spread verically up the hoof wall as well as horizontally towards the heel and toe.At first the separTion causes no pain as it only involves the insensitive structures.

That is the difference between it and laminitis

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My horse had white line disease. My farrier had to cut the hoof wall off all the way up to the coronary band. I'm trying to find the pictures I took of it as the farrier worked on it. It took about a year to completely kill it and have the hoof grow back and look normal once again. To treat it, I had to soak his hoof in espom salt 2x a day for 2 weeks, then apply ThrushBuster. After the 2 weeks, I applied ThrushBuster daily until the hoof grew out completely.

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Ok, I found the pictures. In some of the pictures, the hoof is purple due to the ThrushBuster. Also, there is a picture where the cut out section is black. The black is a kind of glue the farrier put on to help hold a shoe on. I used to know more about it, but I don't really remember because it's been over a year. The pictures aren't in any certain order.

White Line Disease

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I googled "onychomycosis" like Phillip and got that same definition as "a fungal disease of the nail or claw" and was wondering if this word is properly applied. Nasties can get into the wall itself, which is what these pictures look like what happened. That's not the same as white line disease, where the attachment is compromised, (pictured like seedy toe, a deep trench all around the hoof.) This is more like fungal WALL infection that is nasty to deal with, hence the removed infected wall in only one location. (fungal disease of nail or claw...right idea, wrong location) So, its not a white line problem, its a wall problem.

I looked over your pics and I'm sorry, but I had to cringe. This is not the way I would have handled it. The proceedure was too invasive, traumatic, exposing, care intensive, and chemical intensive. But you were in his care, you got it done, and are over the hump...so good! I am not going to dis this procedure, but there are other options available for stuff like this...less in intensity of all the things I mentioned above. A good trim with maximum circulation, good nutrition, good environment, movement. Clean Trax, if all else fails.

If you post links to your Photobucket, it makes it harder for me to get them on here from my end. If the pics are here already, it makes it more doable. Would you be able to post the most recent pic on here, or better still, go take some new ones, plus the bottom of the foot. From what I can see you may just have a stretched white line problem still, which is another weakness on top of the problem of the wall.

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The pink line is a jammed up coronary band in a place where you surely don't need it. The corresponding pink arrows show where that jam is coming from..going all the way up the hoof wall.

The red line depicts heels too long and pulled forward and also adding to the jamming. Blue line shows flare left on foot. Green arrows show jamming going on at the toe, promoting those feathers and chips with every step...no bevel to relieve the wall and improve breakover. The beval also would have lifted the wall OFF the ground and lessened the straw-like moisture take up of the wall that would feed those baddies. The yellow circle speaks for itself.

In the pic below, look at how the circumference of the hoof has expanded. It's taken a big sigh of relief, but the torque is not off of it by the trim that's there. The heels are more upright, but this foot definitely needs a bevel. Still jammed up in the coronary band, right where it DOESN'T need it. Feathering and cracking at toe has not been relieved by a beval and have gone on to chunk out.

Look at the 3 part blue line on pic 1. The first run I drew down from the coronary band is good growth. It's being pulled on by the flaring at the bottom of the hoof. In the 2nd pic, you'll see that the flare is gone at the bottom (not really) and the run of the hoof wall is straight all the way down. The hoof has expanded from being out of the shoe, the flare has not been addressed or disengaged and that first run of blue line in pic 1 has been pulled out to match that flare at the bottom. Now the whole foot top to bottom is flared. (old growth pulling into new growth) As long as there is no bevel, it will continue to pull and flare, pulling the heels forward and stretching the white line with it and becoming more and more pancake-like. I applaud the removal of the shoes, cause I can see the positives, but a good balanced, maintained trim that addresses all torque while this kind of healing is going on is imperative.

Another concern is that I suspect the inside wall of that foot is taller causing an imbalance. That inside wall will be hittin first, jamming all along it, then a splatting force will hit that sectioned wall pushing outwards and flaring it. So, the inside is going to take the intial impact, but that energy is going to splat over sideways when the outside of the hoof finally goes into play during the step...right where there is no hoof wall to help contain it. So this sectioned area is not only jamming up the length of the wall, but also splatting out from the higher side. ...both problems caused by an imbalanced trim.

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[ 02-14-2008, 02:50 PM: Message edited by: missyclare ]

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The picture with the shoe on is more recent then the picture with the shoe off. My farrier didn't want to cut all the hoof wall off that he did. At that point, it was so bad he had no choice. The farrier I had previously did not say anything was wrong with my horse and let him be. I moved, and changed farriers. My current farrier, the one who did all the work on my horse is the one that caught it. My horse was lame on and off, and once my farrier cut the infected area out, you could see a sigh of relief from my horse. Oringinally, my farrier didn't cut as much off as is in the picture with the shoe on. The main reason my farrier decided to cut so much off was to kill the infection. I was having trouble cleaning the area out. Mud, dirt, etc was getting jammed up into the separation, causing the wall to separate even more, so this was the only way to keep the infection from continuing.

From the pictures it may not seem like the shoe was a good idea. The reason the shoe was put on was to even out the weight my horse was putting that hoof. He was putting all his weight on the inside of the hoof, for obvious reasons. The farrier and I agreed that it would be better to put the shoe on so he could even out the weight and thus prevent any other problems.

Like I said before, I don't have a current picture of his hoof, (I'll try to get one next week), but by looking at it, you wouldn't be able to tell he had anything wrong with it!

I will try to put the pictures from photobucket on here, but I'm not very good at it!

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can you get us pics of the bottom of the foot? and the bottom of the foot from the heel forward?

that would be helpful.

thanks MissyClair for your posts. I always learn SO much from them.

ETA - I personally would definately not shoe this horse.

[ 02-15-2008, 01:53 PM: Message edited by: jumpin_horses ]

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You are most welcome Jumpin' horses!

The shoe was the best option for this farrier and what he knows best. But the fact that the laminae have been so compromised, and then to add to that by hanging it with a shoe, just seems insult to injury, even with the solid protection he seems to have now. I would have kept the inside trimmed down and in balance with the foot, along with the beval and everything else. Put a loose, padded Davis boot on for protection to keep it clean and if he needed to be soaking, just throw that in too and let him slosh around all day...clean as a whistle, fully protected and mechanism allowed for healing. Keep this in mind, should your regime ever require this kind of care in the future.

In the pic with the beautiful purple colour, you can see that the hoof is lapsing down on the unsupported side. That foot is as short as it's going to be at that moment. You don't need to see the bottom side to tell. The sole is actually longer than the hoof wall. Not only has the high side splatted it outward, but its definitely on the ground and getting beat up.

The inside is high, because the horse is walking on the inside to avoid the outside. That says discomfort right there. This jams the inside growth upwards, tall and thin and higher than the outside. The wings of P3 are taking a dipping turn in the hoof..inside up, outside down. The heels, bars, sole and wall will all be higher than the other side....the heel bulbs, and pastern distorting as the hoof begins to migrate out from under the horse...sideways. But I won't get into all the pathology caused from one simple imblance, since he's under constant care and will have these thing hopefully tended to in the course of events.

I also would like to see the pics that Jumpin Horse mentioned, plus one from the ground dead on of the front of the hoof. If the inside wall is still higher, then that jam/splat torque is still going on to the laminae despite the shoe at the ground. Added stress, torque not addressed from the trim, stretching of the lamenae from the torque, laminae compromised and infection already present = more invitation for further infection.

I'm glad that you say the horse is healing well and that things have improved greatly. It looks like its been a long care-intensive, expensive road and I'm glad that you are seeing the end of it.

As for me? My journey has helped me realize just how amazingly a horse can heal himself if just given the chance and the analogy "Less is best" just seems to partner with it so perfectly.

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Here's the pictures I took today. I didn't take a picture of the bottom of his hoof since he has a shoe on. I can take a picture if you want... Anyway, as you can see his hoof has completely grown back and looks normal.

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There's only one thing to say, really. This horse needs to have the shoes pulled and a barefoot trim done. Needs to be BALANCED.

See how the circumference of the hoof has gotten smaller again? It feels pinched smaller (1st pic). It is written that the heel platforms will only pull forward as far as the the widest part of the foot.(bout 1/2 way down the frog) That heel in the first pic looks like its just about there. I see no heel support whatsoever and loooong?! and contracted?! Coronary band is still jammed up as well.

Even with that huge hole in the wall in the earlier pictures with the shoe off looks like a much healthier foot to me and better balanced back then. Much better balanced.

Only thing to say. Pull the shoes and get a balanced trim. A beval at the quarters will totally disengage the wall (new growth spot) from the ground. Right now its jamming into that hard shoe and not being allowed to spread and pump blood in order to heal. Proof of this is the wowed up coronary band right above it.

I also suspect that this hoof may have a negative palmer angle which really stresses things at the back....not good. I wish the farrier was as good with a rasp as he is the glue. The trim is EVERYTHING.

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thank you MC for your input, but i did not put pictures of my horse's hoof on here to be critiqued. i simply wanted to show what can happen when white line gets out of control and you are limited on options. i think my farrier did a great job with my horse and i wouldn't trust anyone else with him. i appreciate your opinions, but i am going to do what my farrier is advising me to do. you can ask a few other on here about my farrier and they too will tell you what a great job he does on horses. i don't want to create an arguement, but i wanted to share my opinion also.

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I didn't get to follow the JLH's horse's progress the whole time, but the farrier has done some amazing things and is brought in on many cases by vets. I use the same farrier and have had nothing but good things to say about him since making my switch. He tries to keep horses barefoot whenever possible. He also explains why he does what he does to each client and treats each horse as an individual.

I agree that his feet look long in the recent pictures, but we do not know when the horse was last trimmed. I think the angles of the pics also don't help, but I could be wrong.

JMO.

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quote:

I googled "onychomycosis" like Phillip

Missyclare..I did not google...sorry

I have a 2008/2009 farrier dictionary.

I am very proud that HC has a hoof forum.

It seems that many topics are about barefoot trims and the reason is because many people are doing their own horses feet because a farrier or anvil/shoes/nails are not needed.(I trim my own) [big Grin]

Many horses can go barefoot.....many can't and remain sound with certian types of riding.

It's a simple fact!Every horse on the tip top level at each show that won was shod. from english to western.

Op poster..It looks as if your farrier used light weight shoes..is that right?

I do not think it is professional at all to bash every owner that has shoes on their horse.

oh, by the way eagle eye is phillip [smiley Wavey]

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