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bwillis

When Asking For A Critique Or Help (pics)

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When asking for advice on your horse?s feet, please assist our members by attaching CLEAR pictures of the hooves, as well as a conformation shot. Pictures from ground level of the side, front, back, and bottom. It can also be very helpful to provide a short video of your horse in motion.

It also helps to see things more clearly of your horse?s hooves are picked out and clean. List when the horse was last trimmed, and when the next scheduled trimming will be. Provide as much information as you can. What sort of environment your horse lives and rides in. What you are feeding, how much, how often, and any supplements you are giving. The more information the members have to base their advice on, the better for you and your horse.

If you?ve had recent x-rays done, post those pictures as well as they may be very helpful. If you?ve recently changed farriers/trimmers, before and after pictures help. Please indicate how many trims your horse has had with the new farrier. It helps give a better timeline.

One last thing: put the camera on the ground for all pictures of the hooves. Pictures from other angles give a very skewed representation of the feet.

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I'm updating this cause I want to mention something important. The link you put up Aredhorse is great and shows you the position you need to be in for good pics. However, the heel shot, my most important one is incorrect. What I need to see in this shot also, is the run of bones. That hoof has to hang freely in order to show it. So don't hold onto the hoof and flex it up towards the camera. Hold the hoof by loosely cupping the front of the fetlock and letting it hang, then getting the heels with sufficient solar visual all the way to the toe in the background and camera held vertically to also catch not only the heel bulbs, but ergot and some cannon bone in the bottom. So you'll have to hang the foot, lean forward and catch the cannon all at once. If I can't see the run of bones, I can't help to make the hoof a perfect extension of them and I'll be waaaay off with my advice. I don't like that thought......

Keep the camera a couple of feet from the hoof and don't worry about the background.This will also help to make it easier.:smilie:

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