missyclare

The White Line

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When I think of how I am going to explain this, it feels really lame, but whatever works. I've noticed that some of you are putting your bevels too close to the sole at the toe. Some I've seen right up to the edge of the sole.

Most of us know that the white line is your attachment of bone to hoof. It's a yellowish band sitting between the sole and water line and goes from the ground to the coronary band. It can stretch with torque and get wider (flare) and has a consistency of Indian Rubber. If its infected, it will be black or darker. (thrush) A healthy white line is only 1/8" wide on the solar side.

Ok, now here comes the lame part. [bang Head]

The white line is constructed like 2 bands of velcro stuck together. With these 2 bands, you have the nylon backing and the hook and loops stuck together. On a hoof at microscopic level, these hooks and loops look like trees, with branches and leaves. On the outside of this (your nylon backing) is the baseline membrane that holds those trees. (Think of it like a strong band of root sytem for those trees.)

On the hoof, the inside baseline is against the edge of sole, with the hooks facing outward. On the other side of the white line is another baseline membrane that backs on the water line. (white colour) When the white line is stretched, the outer baseline membrane has torn away, but unlike velcro, cannot reattach. (new attachment has to grow down.) The white line will be wider than 1/8". The outside membrane torn away, useless, painful if continued to be torqued and does not support the horse. (The water line and the wall outside of that torn away outer baseline is also useless with it.) The bevel takes the outer baseline membrane,water line and wall, that is now useless and lifts it off the ground to stop the torque.

The inside baseline membrane, against the sole should be left intact and must not be damaged by the rasp. It's still good to go. This little bit of white line left protects the sole at the toe and protects the inner baseline membrane. So, when I say to leave a hair of the white line intact with the sole at the toe and bevel on out from there, I am asking you to preserve your remaining good baseline membrane and bevel the other one away, till it grows down tight again.

When there's torque from flare, the outside membrane and its hooks are torn at the bottom of the hoof and go up the hoof, increasing the tear. If you look at the outside of the hoof, you can tell how high that tear goes up and know how much of your hold has been compromised.

At the microscopic level again, during laminitis, the trees and branches and leaves all start to break down like they are composting. Turn to mush and lose their hold that way. The whole belt of white line from ground to coronary band, composting simultaneously. With a diet that is rich in sugar, this composting can happen within a weeks time. Serious stuff.

So, if the white line is stretched, leave the baseline membrane in tact and then place the leading edge of your bevel at the toe on out from there. If the white line is tight, then place the leading edge of the bevel leaving a hair of the water line intact and on out from there. (if you still have some pathology to deal with) If the white line is tight, hoof transitioned, you'll be able to leave 1/16" of wall standing above live sole, leave the inside edge of wall intact and bevel on out from there. You also have to leave some wall standing above live sole and bevel like this if P3 is low in the hoof. Once you have the bevel set for your feets according to their situation, then tweaking it gently to maintain once a week will have you moving forward in transition.

Lame, but I hope this helps.

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Thank you for taking the time to really explain the white line. The way you explain it I can really understand it and learn more. It really helps since I am at the beginning of my journey and wanting to continue.

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Missy can I ask you to go one step further, if you don't mind. I know what you are talking about, I think I even made reference to this on another post. But, could you put up a diagram (for the visual learners and newbies) and show exactly what it is you mean? I think that might help them understand better. :confused0024:

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....who's idea was it again to have this seperate Foot Board?

Cause they deserve an Oscar.

Or one of them there thingees that what's his face got for that book on global warming.

* * * * * *

And our leading ladies and men for taking the time to post and draw and explain?

[Not Worthy] [Not Worthy] [Not Worthy]

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Missy can I ask you to go one step further, if you don't mind. I know what you are talking about, I think I even made reference to this on another post. But, could you put up a diagram (for the visual learners and newbies) and show exactly what it is you mean? I think that might help them understand better. :confused0024:

Bump.

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:yahoo:

Instead of an Oscar can I have a cookie? *looks hopeful* How bout a monster cookie? :D I been dying for monster cookies...

:D [Yay]

Edited by Trinity

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SlinkyLFSolarSep206.jpg

I chose a hoof that has a terribly stretched white line.

The red line is the line of sole.

The black line beside it is your inner base membrane. When you place your bevel, the leading edge should be 1/8" outside of the sole line, so that you do not damage the inner baseline membrane.

The other black line is your outer base membrane.

The blue line is your hooks and loops that hold hoof to bone. 1/2 are rooted to the inner baseline membrane growing outward, the other 1/2 on the outer baseline membrane growing inward.

On this hoof, they have been stretched and pulled apart. Everything outside of that inner baseline membrane is useless, painful and not supporting the horse.

Did you know that the white line extends thru the heel platforms, turns and goes approx. 1" down the bar? If you are taking the bar down and uncover a yellow/waxy looking line up the middle of it, that's the white line and you've gone far enough on that bar.

The white coloured line is the water line and it is white.

The green line is the wall.

Whiteline.jpg

This pic shows how far the tear of separation goes up the hoof. The red line coming down the hoof wall has 3 angles to it, the angle changes marked by a thin black line. The changes in direction tell a story of a hoof that is trying to correct and heal, but the torque keeps pulling old flare into new growth and making it flare as well.

Edited by missyclare

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Thank You Missy, you are a doll. [Huggy]

ETA: This is a good illustration. Could we pin this ?

Edited by Mudder

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That was a wonderful pic and illustration. It helps so much to have a picture to go with while reading. I to think this should get a sticky to the top!

MC THANK YOU!!!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to explain all that... I was about to ditto Itchysmom at the end and say I needed pictures, too... but then, there they were... and it STILL didn't make sense! Waiting patiently for that day when that DING DING DING!!! will happen to me. [surrender]

I mean... I GET IT. I just don't get how this works and that works and how they all work together. I get most of the PARTS of the hoof, I just don't get WHICH part does WHAT with WHICH part.

*sigh*

BUT... I'll get there... I WON'T give up... gonna keep reading, and lurking and learning till I DO get it!

So... thanks again for explaining this. Now I can read it over and over and over and over and....

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ok, another visual learner here. First off, thank you for taking all of your time to do this for us. Second, is there anyway to post an "after" picture of the hoof you posted with the lines drawn on it?

COrrect me if I'm wrong, but from what you say about "taking off a hair of the white line"... means to file the water line down in the bevel. And what is the importance of the water line in relationship to the rest of the hoof.

Again, Thanks MC for taking the time to explain the white line thing.

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The horse is 20, and "comfort" is WAY out in front. It's taken a long time to get the hoof here, real slow, not even coaxing, I'd say, "whispering" to the hoof. Major things going on above both hooves in the back end. Makes the other two hooves in front a major concern to being 100% supporting at all times....real slow, patience at its best, especially with the owner. Then there's horse overweight, diet too rich, grass not eliminated, muzzle not being worn (too hot). This horse, despite my trimming and balancing and looking better, but regardless, is floating along in a constant laminitic state. (sigh) Which means, I got the white line fairly tight, but the diet keeps the white line in a weakened, inflammatory state. So there isn't going to any fantastic before and after, cause the story isn't over yet and reads like soap opera. There is however, an idea of what the trimming end has done for/against the white line.

I chose the pics in my earlier post at random. The first one is a LF,(the pancake/flared hoof) the 2nd a RF(the upright stompin' hoof.) I'll try to get a timeline going on one hoof. You'd think the LF with all its flare would be better to use, but not so...this is the upright, RF Hoof.

See the 2 different feets.

SlinkyJuly2006011.jpg

(BELOW) This is July/o6. This was 6 weeks after a pasture trim. (note rasp marks on sole) Horse did not want to move that whole time. (P3 was low in the hoof, wall down to sole, then sole at toe pared as well.) This pic was taken as the barefoot trimmer pulled into the driveway for her first trim.

SlinkyJuly2006008.jpg

This was Mar/07 (8 mos. later) The day we fired the barefoot trimmer. I wasn't allowed to touch this hoof during this time. Don't you touch this hoof she says, it's mine.....(MY hoof???..I thought the horse was wearing it!..NOID voice screaming in my head!) Heels.... no change, hoof shape.... no change, frog looking sicker.... but wait! She forgot the white line!!! It's running away! I get left with a hoof that looks like the bonnet of Laura Ingalls in House on the Prairie!

RFSolar2Mar807.jpg

And don't let the concavity fool yuh, its been reamed out severely (even the bars) and I suspect the lack of support and stability from the inside of the hoof from the reaming has allowed the torque to promote the white line stretch even more. The lack of a proper bevel clinching the deal. From edge of sole to outside wall at the toe......PAIN....FLARES HURT! (Both pics following are at the same time and different views of the Bonnet Foot.

SlinkyMar407RFSolarSide.jpg

You can see the callous of breakover happening ON the stretched white line. I had to rasp right thru it bravely and it was exactly like Indian Rubber...huge rubber slivers coming away with every stroke. Not like rasping the wall at all. This rubbery state of the white line, I believe compressed the callous when she weighted it and why you see a bevel on the pic of above, but not hardly any bevel on the pic below. Just like Indian Rubber.

RightSide2Mar807.jpg

This pic is Sep./07. (6 months later) This is the owners trim, who had started learning and had sent this pic to me to critique...little boo boo at the inside toe quarter, but much improved white line. Toes still long from wall to apex,(but have to obey the sole), but but letting go...hoof rounder and heels spreading. Wiggly line is a temper tantrum move from realizing just how much more the breakover needs to be improved yet...all trying to coax the sole while obeying at the same time. Getting the white line tight was a piece of cake next to this. The sole has also been pulled forward.

RFSolarSep1707.jpg

The rest of my pics are of the abscess foot in the hind, which has erupted twice since this pic and a month each time waiting for it to erupt, badly disturbed trimming schedule because of it and a lot of wonkiness from the horse constantly changing up weight diagonally from back to front from pain. Laminitic episodes from vacs, grass, not wearing muzzle, added weight gain, then loss from abscess pain and fever from abscesses. A real soap opera. I am going next Wed. and will take pics, but I have a sinking feeling that I've lost ground on this foot from this pic. Owner is also tweaking between my visits, may have trimmed abscess foot too short and caused the 2nd abscess. I had to pull her off this horse cause I really don't care what pathology I'm looking at and how slowly its coming along. She's retired and comfort is still way out there on my sleeve. This RF hoof is the least of her worries and I want to keep it that way.

Check out the distance from the the heel bulb profile to the back of the heel platforms on the Bonnet Foot, then compare it to this last pic. The hoof has indeed come back under the horse's descending weight, in spite of the toe and everything else in this soap opera.

Edited by missyclare

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Journeysgirl: Leave a hair of the inner edge of the water line intact and bevel on out from there. Yes, all but the inner edge is now part of the bevel. The water line is living tissue that grows down from the band. Its main function is support...tough very resilient.

I'm really flattered that you guys chose to pin this, especially since I approached it in such an unprofessional manner! I find that when faced with scientific names, it tends to drive me nuts and I really have to weed thru it. All I ever wanted to do was understand it. So hopefully there is more understanding without all the trappings here. :confused0024: I'm glad it helped. :grin:

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This was Mar/07 (8 mos. later) The day we fired the barefoot trimmer. I wasn't allowed to touch this hoof during this time. Don't you touch this hoof she says, it's mine.....(MY hoof???..I thought the horse was wearing it!..NOID voice screaming in my head!) Heels.... no change, hoof shape.... no change, frog looking sicker.... but wait! She forgot the white line!!! It's running away! I get left with a hoof that looks like the bonnet of Laura Ingalls in House on the Prairie!]

And don't let the concavity fool yuh, its been reamed out severely (even the bars) and I suspect the lack of support and stability from the inside of the hoof from the reaming has allowed the torque to promote the white line stretch even more. The lack of a proper bevel clinching the deal. From edge of sole to outside wall at the toe......PAIN....FLARES HURT! (Both pics following are at the same time and different views of the Bonnet Foot.

Thank God that idiot was fired. Hmmmmm, don't suppose trimmer was connected to Ms. Strasser and her barbaric methods, ay? That "reaming out" screams STRASSER. [bang Head]

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Thought I'd add a little bit of something I found on the net cause I found it helpful in further understanding horse feet......

The walls

The walls are to be considered both as a protective shield, covering the sensitive internal hoof tissues, just like the exoskeleton of arthropods, and as a structure devoted to dissipating the energy of concussion and to provide grip on different terrains. They are elastic and very tough, similar to a teflon layer; its thickness is approximately 6 mm - 12 mm. The walls are composed of three distinct layers: the pigmented layer, the water line and the white line.

The pigmented layer is generated by the coronet and its color is just like that of the coronet skin whence it is derived. If the coronet skin has any dark patch, the walls show a parallel pigmented line, from the coronet to the ground, showing the wall's growth direction. This layer has a prevalent protective role and is not so resistant to ground contact, where it can break and flake away.

The water line is built up by the coronet and by the wall's corium (the living tissue immediately beneath the walls). Its thickness increases proportional to the distance from the coronet and, in the lower third of the walls, is thicker than the pigmented layer. It is very resistant to contact to the ground and it serves a mainly support function.

The white line is the inner layer of the wall. It is softer and fibrous in structure. Its color is yellowish. You can see it in the underside of the healthy hoof as a thin line joining the sole and the walls. The white line grows out from the laminar connections. Any visible derangement of the white line indicates some important derangement of laminar connections that fix the walls to the underlying P3 bone. Since the white line is softer than both the walls and the sole, it wears fast where it appears on the surface and it appears as a subtle groove between the sole and the walls, often with some debris or sand inside.

The three layers of the wall merge in a single mass and they grow downwards together. If the wall doesn't wear naturally, from sufficient movement on abrasive terrains, then it will protrude from the solar surface. It then becomes prone to breakage and the healthy hoof will self-trim, by breaking or chipping off.

When a horseshoe is applied, it is fixed to the wall. Nails are driven in, oblique to the walls. They enter the wall at the outside edge of the white line and they emerge at the wall's surface, approximately 15-20 mm from the base of the wall.

The wall is anatomically analogous to the human finger or toe nail

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Missy: I have to say that this information you posted on White Line was a HUGE help to my understanding of it and very timely as one of my geldings is now battling it.

Part of his left front hoof has broken away. The Farrier opoened it up just a little more to give it air and told me to put thrush medicine or iodine in there to dry it out so the bacteria will leave and the hoof can heal. Also feeding him a hoof care supplement. He does have a shoes on and hold well.

I think that is all I can do for the situation unless you suggest anything else. I would appreciate any advice.

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When I think of how I am going to explain this, it feels really lame, but whatever works. I've noticed that some of you are putting your bevels too close to the sole at the toe. Some I've seen right up to the edge of the sole.

Most of us know that the white line is your attachment of bone to hoof. It's a yellowish band sitting between the sole and water line and goes from the ground to the coronary band. It can stretch with torque and get wider (flare) and has a consistency of Indian Rubber. If its infected, it will be black or darker. (thrush) A healthy white line is only 1/8" wide on the solar side.

Ok, now here comes the lame part. [bang Head]

The white line is constructed like 2 bands of velcro stuck together. With these 2 bands, you have the nylon backing and the hook and loops stuck together. On a hoof at microscopic level, these hooks and loops look like trees, with branches and leaves. On the outside of this (your nylon backing) is the baseline membrane that holds those trees. (Think of it like a strong band of root sytem for those trees.)

On the hoof, the inside baseline is against the edge of sole, with the hooks facing outward. On the other side of the white line is another baseline membrane that backs on the water line. (white colour) When the white line is stretched, the outer baseline membrane has torn away, but unlike velcro, cannot reattach. (new attachment has to grow down.) The white line will be wider than 1/8". The outside membrane torn away, useless, painful if continued to be torqued and does not support the horse. (The water line and the wall outside of that torn away outer baseline is also useless with it.) The bevel takes the outer baseline membrane,water line and wall, that is now useless and lifts it off the ground to stop the torque.

The inside baseline membrane, against the sole should be left intact and must not be damaged by the rasp. It's still good to go. This little bit of white line left protects the sole at the toe and protects the inner baseline membrane. So, when I say to leave a hair of the white line intact with the sole at the toe and bevel on out from there, I am asking you to preserve your remaining good baseline membrane and bevel the other one away, till it grows down tight again.

When there's torque from flare, the outside membrane and its hooks are torn at the bottom of the hoof and go up the hoof, increasing the tear. If you look at the outside of the hoof, you can tell how high that tear goes up and know how much of your hold has been compromised.

At the microscopic level again, during laminitis, the trees and branches and leaves all start to break down like they are composting. Turn to mush and lose their hold that way. The whole belt of white line from ground to coronary band, composting simultaneously. With a diet that is rich in sugar, this composting can happen within a weeks time. Serious stuff.

So, if the white line is stretched, leave the baseline membrane in tact and then place the leading edge of your bevel at the toe on out from there. If the white line is tight, then place the leading edge of the bevel leaving a hair of the water line intact and on out from there. (if you still have some pathology to deal with) If the white line is tight, hoof transitioned, you'll be able to leave 1/16" of wall standing above live sole, leave the inside edge of wall intact and bevel on out from there. You also have to leave some wall standing above live sole and bevel like this if P3 is low in the hoof. Once you have the bevel set for your feets according to their situation, then tweaking it gently to maintain once a week will have you moving forward in transition.

Lame, but I hope this helps.

dame were do you buy your tobacco from? I want to smoke me some of that , Its just gota be out of this world gear [shocked]

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MissyClare: Your post was very helpful. I, too, am in the learning process with the help of my trimmer. It was suggest that I come here & check out your (everyones) posts on this section. I appreciate your postings with pictures. Its helping things to "click" in my head! I'm a visual learner so it was much easier to understand when you posted the picture!

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no the inner wall is just unpigmented hoof wall. Now that begs the question why is it unpigmented??? Don't know I have ideas but no science to back any of it up.

But it IS called the water line.

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