soquile1

What Am I Getting Myself Into.

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Hello!

I have never posted on here, usually on other forums, but I am coming to the experts for your advice. Here's the deal, I ride western. Mostly trails and dabble in WP at local shows. I have a two year old that will start training in the fall of this year. I bought this little guy for WP but everyone that sees him tells me "you are going to do HJ with him right?" "he so moves for English" blah blah blah. Now I am not adverse to trying something new in fact it might be kind of exciting. I know that they are different disciplines and such but I want to know what am I really getting myself into. I know the basic as far as getting new tack etc but what about mentally, physically. Not to say you can't teach an old dog new tricks but I am no spring chicken! I have an old video of this colt on youtube(he is just a yearling), if you haven't seen it from the other forums, just type in Levi colt running, and it should be the first video. His gate has not changed other than he does the 'flat footed' trot (did I get that right) and really stretches out better as he gets older. Any information would be much appreciated as to what I am getting myself into, or should I slap a western saddle on him and call it good!

PS, he strings out to 16h when he tops off. (if that makes a difference)

Thanks!

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Life's too short. Just do it :grin:

There is a coming-four year old in my barn. Very handsome AQHA/APHA boy. Owner does the western thing primarily BUT I've seen his gelding not only move with that lovely hunter daisy-cutter trot but jump anything in front of him with ease and GAWJUS form. He'd be wasted in a WP ring. I am politely nagging the guy to send him to my friend who's a H/J trainer. I pray he does!

Besides, if you don't like it, go back to what you know.

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I guess the question is whether you're interested in trying out a new discipline, and whether you have any resources near you (trainers, or friends who ride H/J) to help out with the process.

I think that trying different disciplines is great, and always makes you a better rider. I learned Western as a kid, switched to English, and as an adult I'm learning to jump. But I still enjoy popping a western saddle on my pony from time to time (although she's not very good at the Western style gaits).

You can pick up good quality used tack, so that shouldn't be a problem. But if you've never ridden English before, or ridden it only ocassionally, you may want a trainer or experienced friend who can help you out.

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You can always send the handsome guy over my way ;) But yes DEF. try the h/j world.. I did just pleasure trail and bareback riding and once I took lessons I was in love with the H/J riding. Havn't gone back to western since (:

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I am really talking myself into trying this. I think it would be fun to try! From his movement what do you think? Most everyone at my barn rides western but there are a few english riders lurking and are keeping their eye on him. Now all I have to do is find a good trainer around me.

Thanks!

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I took up english a little over a year ago. Have always, always ridden western but my Morgan really wasn't liking the slow western stuff and I was a little bored with it myself. English is a LOT of work but it is so much fun! And Remy really likes it - oddly too it's helped his western as well.

Just recently I came to the conclusion that I far prefer riding english over riding western. If you would have told me that just 6 months ago, I would have laughed. [ROTFL]

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I took up english a little over a year ago. Have always, always ridden western but my Morgan really wasn't liking the slow western stuff and I was a little bored with it myself. English is a LOT of work but it is so much fun! And Remy really likes it - oddly too it's helped his western as well.

Just recently I came to the conclusion that I far prefer riding english over riding western. If you would have told me that just 6 months ago, I would have laughed. [ROTFL]

I agree with the getting bored with one thing. Sometimes its like....what can I do now. My mare does everything WP plus is a great trail horse, mixing in barrels and poles just to change things up a bit. Now I can look forward to doing something else and can have a horse for each disapline. If I want to ride western time to saddle up the mare, if I'm feeling english, time to saddle up the gelding. This is going to be fun.

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I can't view the video from here, but heck, why not?

That said, are we talking about "hunter/jumper" style English, or "HUS" style English? Or dressage? Or even eventing? ;) There's lots of fun things to choose from, but it's all a little different :)

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I can't view the video from here, but heck, why not?

That said, are we talking about "hunter/jumper" style English, or "HUS" style English? Or dressage? Or even eventing? ;) There's lots of fun things to choose from, but it's all a little different :)

[ROTFL] Greek Greek and Greek. I wish I knew what all those different types were! Well, I know dressage and eventing. Not sure if I am able to do those, maybe if I started a little younger! So what is the difference between hunter/jumper style and HUS (not sure what that stands for [Crazy] ) I'm just used to seeing people with english saddles going around the ring posting, side passing and doing small jumps etc. I am sure there is alot more to it, I guess I need to sit down in front of the computer and google myself silly reading all about the differences.

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go for it! I would advise you find a reputable trainer near you to train with. It depends on which direction you want to go. I.E. Hunter/Jumper or HUS. I know next to nothing about the HUS discipline.

Good luck and have fun! :smileywavey:

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[ROTFL] So what is the difference between hunter/jumper style and HUS (not sure what that stands for [Crazy] ) I'm just used to seeing people with english saddles going around the ring posting, side passing and doing small jumps etc. I am sure there is alot more to it, I guess I need to sit down in front of the computer and google myself silly reading all about the differences.

hunter/jumper, the version I participate in, is the kind that you see at hunter specific horse shows :) Basically, hunt seat equitation. Breeds of choice are warmblood and thoroughbred types, shows are rated and based on USEF rules. Essentially, h/j type riders are members of a serious and dogmatic religion, with our Bible being "Hunter Seat Equitation" by George Morris (and our Bible Study guide is "Winning" by Anna Jane-White Mullin). For Hunters, the judging is based on movement and quality of jump- emphasis on the jumping (one division might have 2-3 jumping classes with only one flat class or "hack"). Hunters should jump with their knees as close to their eyeballs as possible, while rounding over the back. They should complete their courses with very little variation in rhythm, they should easily "get" the strides and spots to each jump so it looks smooth and, well, boring. Jumpers, on the other hand, is about leaving up jumps and performing in a certain time. Equitation is judged on how well the rider read the Bible. (position, control of the horse, complicated jumping courses executed perfectly).

"HUS" is basically the stock breed version of hunters (on the flat)- we elitist and snobby h/j types tend to refer to this as "winglish" as it's sort of like western pleasure in english tack (with longer strides of course). It's a discipline unto itself, really, and done at breed shows (judged under AQHA or APHA rules). Breed-show english equitation is a little different from the USEF version too- the desired rider position is a little different (more upright, basically), the "frame" the horses go in is different (generally, lower with the head), and the "tests" are different (in USEF land, there are various tests that can be called for, like dropping stirrups, doing a figure 8, etc. In stock breed land, equitation tests are more like the ones in western- involving doing a pattern with cones). One caveat, though, is that stock breed hunter competition is basically the same as the H/J version in terms of judging, though in the USEF world the jumps get much higher at the highest levels. :)

Whichever way you go, a horse with a naturally long stride and good "forward" button is where you start :)

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I don't want to jack your thread but I just want to say, I'm kind of in the same boat. I'm working on switching my western/trail horse over to english riding. So this thread has been very informative! Thanks everyone!

Good Luck!

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hunter/jumper, the version I participate in, is the kind that you see at hunter specific horse shows :) Basically, hunt seat equitation. Breeds of choice are warmblood and thoroughbred types, shows are rated and based on USEF rules. Essentially, h/j type riders are members of a serious and dogmatic religion, with our Bible being "Hunter Seat Equitation" by George Morris (and our Bible Study guide is "Winning" by Anna Jane-White Mullin). For Hunters, the judging is based on movement and quality of jump- emphasis on the jumping (one division might have 2-3 jumping classes with only one flat class or "hack"). Hunters should jump with their knees as close to their eyeballs as possible, while rounding over the back. They should complete their courses with very little variation in rhythm, they should easily "get" the strides and spots to each jump so it looks smooth and, well, boring. Jumpers, on the other hand, is about leaving up jumps and performing in a certain time. Equitation is judged on how well the rider read the Bible. (position, control of the horse, complicated jumping courses executed perfectly).

"HUS" is basically the stock breed version of hunters (on the flat)- we elitist and snobby h/j types tend to refer to this as "winglish" as it's sort of like western pleasure in english tack (with longer strides of course). It's a discipline unto itself, really, and done at breed shows (judged under AQHA or APHA rules). Breed-show english equitation is a little different from the USEF version too- the desired rider position is a little different (more upright, basically), the "frame" the horses go in is different (generally, lower with the head), and the "tests" are different (in USEF land, there are various tests that can be called for, like dropping stirrups, doing a figure 8, etc. In stock breed land, equitation tests are more like the ones in western- involving doing a pattern with cones). One caveat, though, is that stock breed hunter competition is basically the same as the H/J version in terms of judging, though in the USEF world the jumps get much higher at the highest levels. :)

Whichever way you go, a horse with a naturally long stride and good "forward" button is where you start :)

ditto! I love your description GT LOL

your boy is quite the looker and would do well in the h/j world I think..He moves like my gelding! Who is a mustang btw! LOL If you dont want him i'll take him *grins* Appys arent my first choice but I would snatch him up in a second! LOL

Check out the h/j boards you will find loads of info on there! Welcome to the dark side! LOL

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[ROTFL] OMG, I'm in the same boat with you. I took my filly to the trainer to get her going WP for my son to ride for a few years before moving her into speed events. Trainer kept telling me that she'll do ok WP but she want's to be a hunt seater. Well, the chances of convincing my 11 YO son to ride her English are slim to none so I'm gonna take a stab at it. I've always wanted to learn to jump properly anyway and you've got to start with the basics. I even was told by a judge at a show a couple weeks ago that I should ride her English, I was riding her western in a W/T class. After the class was over my trainer and I were sitting in the line up waiting for the rest of the class to exit. Judge comes over and asks if we are in the next class. We tell her no, we're just waiting and she asks me if I ride my filly English at all. When I tell her no she says that I should.

So here I am, making the leap to the dark side too. [ROTFL]

PS, sorry for the hi-jack. Good luck.

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I'm gonna do it, dark side or not! I have one girl at my stable that rides English (she's 16) big age gap but what the heck. I am going to have a trainer put 30-60 days on him, real light as he has just turned 2. I do not want to push him and let him keep growing w/o hurting his legs. Basically get him used to being saddled, walk and trot etc. He wants to do something as he just crys at me when I take my mare out. So he is going to be broke western and then I will start taking lessons on him doing English. Hopefully it will be an easy transition. Now all I need to do is find the right tack. Any suggestions as I have NO CLUE as to what to look for saddle wise, brand etc. I am thinking black, what do you think. I don't know if brown or lt brown would look good on him.

Here is a more current pic of him:

levimarch084.jpg

This one for fun, gotta love the spotted butts (him and my mare-Look at his long legs! He's not yet two in this pic and my mare is 16H!) Yes he is dusty from rolling.

levimarch082.jpg

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Wow..he's quite the looker! But...

IMHO and with all due respect and kindness, I'd really wait until he's four to ride. Fine to do allllll the ground work, basic tacking up, desensitizing, ground driving and first backing, but that's it. Their spine doesn't finish until their 4 - 5, so for long-term benefit, wait.

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What a lovely young horse! I do agree with Choco though, it's better to wait until he's older before putting him in any serious training (especially jumping!). You'll probably find that an English trainer will want you to wait, too.

As for tack, choose brown (there's no rule against black, but I'm told many judges don't care for it). Stubben and Crosby are both very reputable and reliable brands to consider, and they won't set you back nearly as much as the Butets and Antares often seen in the hunter world. If the cantle on the saddle is rounded, it's considered an all purpose saddle (generally), if the cantle is squared off it's generally considered a close contact saddle.

I ride at a barn that's fairly blue collar, but we have a very good trainer and the girls all do well at the shows. Most of them ride in some version of a Stubben Siegfried. Again, it doesn't have "snob appeal", but the Siegfried has been around for so long, and works so well for so many riders, that I think it's pretty much accepted everywhere.

If your seat is secure enough to ride in a saddle without knee rolls, you can pick up a nice used Crosby on eBay for under $400, and it will last forever.

If you're considering a purchase on eBay or any other "no return" seller, it's best to see if you can borrow other people's saddles first, so you can see what really works for you and your horse. You may not want to spend a lot until the training and growing is over, as his body will change.

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[Well, the chances of convincing my 11 YO son to ride her English are slim to none so I'm gonna take a stab at it. I've always wanted to learn to jump properly anyway and you've got to start with the basics.

He really should ride English. My girls are in jumping and I always joke with my wife that if I knew what it was like when I was a kid I would have been in english riding - The girl to boy ratio is like 1000 to 1... :)

Besides, jumping is awesome...

gallery_53270_1169_363892.jpg

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Wow..he's quite the looker! But...

IMHO and with all due respect and kindness, I'd really wait until he's four to ride. Fine to do allllll the ground work, basic tacking up, desensitizing, ground driving and first backing, but that's it. Their spine doesn't finish until their 4 - 5, so for long-term benefit, wait.

Double yup...

Yup he's gorgeus!!! My girls would kill for him.

And yup, he's way too young.

In our jumping barn, which is mainly a breeding/training facility, the horses aren't even started under saddle until they are 4. Starting at 2 could cause some serious damage.

Start with lot's of groundwork and take your time, but don't be tempted to rush under saddle. It may end up hurting him in the long run.

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Wow..he's quite the looker! But...

IMHO and with all due respect and kindness, I'd really wait until he's four to ride. Fine to do allllll the ground work, basic tacking up, desensitizing, ground driving and first backing, but that's it. Their spine doesn't finish until their 4 - 5, so for long-term benefit, wait.

I do not agree. I think that most horses should be started at 2.... 3 at the latest. It is so hard for them mentally to learn it later!

It can most certainly be done but why not do it earlier... we start all our horses at 2 and have never had any adverse side effects. Its not like we are racing them!

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