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nikki3006

Horse Lice

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I have been dealing with horse lice for over a year. The vet here says to give ivermectin every two weeks to the horses until the lice is gone and put powder on the backs every few days. The lice never seems to go away. Last summer the vet said the lice was gone and by fall when I had to put a horse down she said the lice was back. It seems like a vicious cycle and I am running out of ideas. Another vet gave me a shampoo but until it warms up and the sun is out that is not an option. I have been doing research on diatomaceous earth and I was wondering if anyone has used this for lice or worming. Any help or guideance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Erica

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Are your horses out on pasture or in a barn? If I'm not mistaken, chickens and barn swallows can carry lice and that's where horses that are kept in barns can get lice.

Do you know how they originally got it & what the source is? If they're truly gone and then they come back, it sounds like there's a source somewhere that they're exposed to and the easiest thing is get rid of the source.

I would be hesitant to do the ivomec every two weeks long term just because that's a lot of poison in their system. I've not used the diatomacious earth but if it works that would be a safer option.

Hopefully someone will have some answers for you. Good luck!

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Sevin dust applied to the coat every five days gets rid of them.

Tie the horse and apply to the skin all over and especially the mane, tail, forelock, topline and underline. Keep the horse tied for a few hours so they can''t roll and waste it.

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Ivermectin will kill off sucking lice, but not biting lice. Also, it does nothing at all to the eggs. Therefore, you have to be very diligent with the powder: correct interval, coverage, amount, etc. And repeat far longer than you think necessary.

Lice tend to spread. They will get off the horse being treated and go to another horse that isn't, or one that isn't being treated as thoroughly (like one that didn't get caught once at treatment time, or is a little spooky and didn't get good coverage with the powder, etc.). Brushes, blankets, and the like can spread them easily too. You have to really crack down to get rid of them entirely.

And they will find the weakest horse to "hide out" on and reappear, so when you have that one horse that doesn't do as well, just go ahead and treat for lice.

Good luck! We had a mare dropped off in 1997 for breeding that had lice and we have been treating for lice ever since.

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Thank you for your help. My horses are in a pasture and not around any chickens or fowl. I rescued a horse last spring and didn't know that he had lice until I brought him home. I have never been around and or heard of horse lice because I was always around good clean, healthy horses so I was never exposed to this until it was too late. We still have snow on the ground and I was told by a professor that studied lice on horses that they need a host to live so therefore they do not live on the ground and or trees unless the hop into a source within a certain amount of time. I have been putting lice powder on them but it is extremly hard with their winter coat. So I work the powder in as much as I can. Thanks again for your help if you can think of anything else please let me know.

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Is there anyway that you could isolate one at a time and then vigoursly treat that one until they're gone. Keep him isolated so he stays clear. Then isolate another one and treat him vigorously & then wait until you know he's clear and put him with the other one that's clear. Then pull the 3rd one and isolate him and do the same thing.

At least that way you're minimizing the chance of picking it back up from one another and you're controlling their environment a little more.

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I know exactly what you are experiencing! I got a 28 year old horse for graduation that i wanted because he was skinny and arthritic. I felt that when i get old..i want someone to take care of me...so someone should take care of him until it's just to impossible to do and keep him comfortable. Well...after getting him i discovered he had lice. I was pissed!!! I KNEW he was wormy but i didn't realize he was wormy AND SUPER parasitic. I got him in summer so this made it a little easier but this is what i did....

He hadn't lost his winter coat very well because of the worms, poor nutrition, and lice...so I took a winter curry comb...the round metal ones...and brushed as much loose hair off that i could. Then i gave him a total body clip. I mean EVERYTHING got done. I then washed him with regular mane and tail shampoo to moisturize some of his dry skin and get rid of the dirt and stuff. THEN I ran over to the vet and got a product called Poridon. It is a lice killer and keeps flies away and stuff. The vet also told me to use regular pet lice/flea shampoo so a few days later I used that. He also got dewormed with the Panacure power pack.

Poor nutrition is also a cause for lice as well so make sure they have a good diet. I continued on with his normal deworming program for our area/seasons and did weekly lice shampoo treatments for about a month or so to take care of the eggs in conjuction with the Poridon. After that I used regular livestock/cattle fly spray and he's never had an issue since.

Make sure to wash any blankets, brushes, polo wraps, etc. Horses that are blanketed also can have lice issues as well sometimes...makes for a nice warm breeding ground under there!

If you want i could send you a bottle of the poridon. You simply bead a line from the poll all the way to the end of their butt. I still have a whole bottle you can surely have! It works great!

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my horses had lice last summer but only for about a week. i used apple cider vineger i just poured into an old spray bottle . id completly cover them with it.

i works pretty good and it give the bays , if used over a long period of time, a nice orangie shine and made mine look like buckskins lol

i 100% reccomend it over the lice dusts and stuff that can cause cancer

Edited by gonedunit225

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Be sure to treat brushes, blankets, saddle pads. Scrub stalls and dust with Sevin or spray with periterin. Nutrition and grooming are essential for a healthy coat.

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We have a tree lice that is very abundant in our wildlife up here. The horses get them no matter what condition they are in just from a squirrel collecting spruce cones. First off ditto to what Manes says. NO on the over doses of ivermetin. Seen several horses die from that up here from the advice of a vet. It will not get rid of the eggs and new ones will hatch.

Washing does help, but like you I'm still in winter .(Its 14 right now) I have found out that vitimin "B" does help. Bugs hate the taste of it. It helps even for Mosquito control. Not sure about the bot flys, but the knats don't eat them up either. Might be something you could try. "B" goes right out of their system so the chance of overdose is low. Red Cell or Millinium Gold vitamins is a good source in the northwest for making that blood and skin taste bad also by giving a pregnant Mares dose. Vitamin "B" can't hurt them especially if they eat "Marestail", that fern strips the "B" out of their systems. Just put a couple tablespoons in their food daily.

Hope that helps some.

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Edited by Alaskandraft

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