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kimbersf

Ok To Buy Green Horse?

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i used to ride, show, do cross country, etc., as a teenager, but haven't ridden for 20 years. i want to get back into it and can dedicate 15 or 20 hours a week. i've fallen for a VERY sweet, 3-year old friesian gelding and would like to buy him, have him professionally trained for 90 days, then work with a trainer 2-3 times a week. am i crazy since i'm just getting back into riding or is it ok to re-learn with a horse that is also learning?

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i used to ride, show, do cross country, etc., as a teenager, but haven't ridden for 20 years. i want to get back into it and can dedicate 15 or 20 hours a week. i've fallen for a VERY sweet, 3-year old friesian gelding and would like to buy him, have him professionally trained for 90 days, then work with a trainer 2-3 times a week. am i crazy since i'm just getting back into riding or is it ok to re-learn with a horse that is also learning?

With the game plan you have outlined, it sounds like a win-win situation!

I've ridden all my life, then got hurt on a witch of a mare and have had confidence issues ever since. I am conquering those issues and have had a LOT of training put on our home grown colt, who is now 4. I've been riding him off and on since last year, with help from the trainers and from friends. I *know* what to do, and am getting better at having the confidence at actually doing the things I know how to do.

With you, there are no confidence issues, just needing to get reacquainted with the saddle once more. I think you have a grand idea!

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Ditto to what Andi said. If you stick to your game plan and the horse does well in training, you are more likely to succeed. A lot will depend on the trainer you send him to. I'm lucky enough to be great friends with a local trainer, and I wouldn't think twice about hopping on anything she'd spent 90 days working with, even if I'd never ridden the horse. I can't say that about every trainer I've been around, though. But it sounds like you've done your homework, so best of luck to you, and keep us posted.

Edited by barefootlena

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A three year old can be a handful! Even after 90 days of training, you're going to be riding a baby and dealing with baby antics.

You haven't ridden in twenty years, find yourself an older more experienced horse. :twitch:

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Your best bet is to discuss it with your trainer, he or she will be able to guide you in the right direction to a program for you and whatever horse you choose. As a trainer, I know that I really appreciate when clients include me in this sort of decision making because it makes my job easier!

Good Luck!

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It all depends on the geldings personality and disposition. If you find a calm, easy-going colt, then you will do better than having a high strung, pushy colt.

I suggest you start taking a few lessons ASAP. Just to get into the groove of things again. And be very picky about the horse you purchase.

If you buy this colt. You can always try him out after the 90 Days and see how he is going. If need be you could send him for 120 Days (which I highly suggest). While he is in training, I suggest you continue taking lessons, also.

This is to bring the transition of getting back into riding much easier for you, that way when time comes to get on your colt. You will be ready, comfortable, and very confident!!!!

Good Luck & Happy Trails!

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Since this came back up, I wanted to add something ...

Taking lessons on a broke horse is good but I highly recommend taking lessons WITH the trainer on YOUR horse so you know how your horse acts, reacts and is trained.

I think the OP has an excellent plan lined out and with the right horse, she will be fine. I have a 4 year old that we raised (own both parents) and he's on the hot side but very gentle and wouldn't hurt me intentionally. But I know my limits, mostly due to a confidence issue, and I have a trainer ride him a couple times a week and then I ride him a couple times a week. So far, it's working well and he's in a shank now.

Good luck and give us an update!

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I agree start out with at least lessons before buying a green horse. I found out after not riding for 29 years I had a lot of work for me to get my muscles back in shape for riding. And I think Friesian's are not easy going? At least not the ones I have seen at shows. I made the mistake of buying the breed I wanted as a kid, an Arabian, which wasn't what I should get in my 40s starting over. So later sold him to someone that was an Arabian person, I am a Quarter Horse person.

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