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doublecut04

What Are These Bits?

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Just want to say I found these at a local Tack sale and bought them to hang on the wall. (and maybe play a few jokes here and there) But they will never be near a horses mouth. I also bought them in fear some redneck would come along and use them...

I Showed them to a few people at the barn. And the BO. No one had seen such a bit.

They are old and small. The one with the Ring is smaller then the other one. I don't think ether one would fit in a QH's mouth. They are like Arab sized or some other small muzzled breed.

Bit #1.

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Bit #2.

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If you want anymore pictures just let me know. If you want it I can take a short Video of bit #2 moving.

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I know bit 2 is a driving bit of some sort. I dont know the name of it though. Bit 1 probably is a driving bit too? Not sure about that one.

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Bit #1.

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This is a "ring bit."

Found this accurate description on Wiki:

"A ring bit is a bit that includes a ring passed through the horse's mouth and encircling the lower jaw.

"In the American west, a metal ring fastened to a spade bit at the highest point of the bit mouthpiece passing through the horse's mouth, and surrounded the lower jaw was called a "ring bit." This design was more common in the Southwest than in the Northwest, and gradually disappeared from both areas, but remained in general use in Mexico. Today, the ring bit is most common in horse racing, and usually has a jointed snaffle bit, with the ring linked to the bit rings or lower cheeks."

It is a severe bit IMO.

Half-cheek.jpg

Edited by HorsingRound

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I new it was some sort of a ring bit. But I had never seen one with a port? only ever on a snaffle..

Thanks!

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Yes, Bit one is a ring bit

Bit two is a Jawbreaker leverage bit for driving.

ETA: AT least, That;s what we called them.

Edited by manesntails

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I can see how it would be a Jaw breaker...The BO put it on my knee and pulled the things making it tight..OMG i thought he was gunna pop my knee cap off..

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Bit #2.

ImportedPhotos00244.jpg

This is quite a contraption! I've seen these types of bits before--fortunately hanging on someone's wall. I don't know what they're called, but I'm guessing the loops along the mouthpiece would go in the horse's mouth too and pull away from the mouthpiece if one pulled on a rein attached to the small ring. Ouch. It hurts just looking at it.

Both of these bits are very old (100 years, maybe more); horses were generally smaller and narrower back then, as one can tell from looking at old saddles.

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No the loops are outside the mouth and come in onto the horse's lower jaw with a tremendous amount of force.

It is very possible to break a horse's bottom jaw with this bit.

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No the loops are outside the mouth and come in onto the horse's lower jaw with a tremendous amount of force.

It is very possible to break a horse's bottom jaw with this bit.

I believe it! I think if someone has to use a bit like this (or the ring bit), there's a MAJOR hole in their horse's training!

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Yes that Is one reason i bought them..Knowing some of the people in this area. they would sure buy them and try and use them...

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I believe it! I think if someone has to use a bit like this (or the ring bit), there's a MAJOR hole in their horse's training!

That bit would be used on a horse that was not trained properly. You have to train a Standardbred Racehorse what position on the track means. Outside is slow jog area when going clockwise and inside is faster.

Once they turn to go counter clockwise they are supposed listen to the driver and only really go full out when asked.

When you get idiots home training driving horses, people who are NOT trainers but think they know what to do; they think all that's necessary is to take the horse out and go fast every day. This teaches nothing but uncontrollability and does not build muscle. Then you have a horse that runs off whenever his feet hit the track. Pain is about all that will stop that, if the horse is older.

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I believe the first is what we used to call a Mexican ring bit. In the hands of a highly-skilled trainer, it's probably okay, but not in the hands of an amateur.

So many training bits are seen by the amateur and the first thing they think is, "Wow, that's what I want!", withpout knowing its purpose or how to use it. I have several bits designed by Jim Trammel for specific training purposes, but never used them.

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the ring bit reminds me of today's anti-rearing bit...

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The race trainers over here can't lead their horses onto the track without the anti-rearing bits in their horses mouths. Some trainers like to race in them, too. :rolleye0014:

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Chiffney bits are very common at racetracks and TB training barns. I've had to use them on 2-3 yr old stud colts at a TB farm I worked at. Same with lip chains.

I didn't like having to use those things, but I came to the realization very quickly that when they advised you to use a certain piece of equipment on a certain horse, there was usually a good reason.

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