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4x4performancehorses

Bumper? Confo Critique And Confo ? About My New Filly!

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Okay so I would like a critique on my new filly she is 5 years old and she is about 15.2 hands tall. She is a SUPER nice barrel horse as well as a trained cutter. BUT I have a question about her confo. also she looks good all over to me and she performs good but right were her spine meets her hips she has like a raised vertabrae??? I guess it almost looks like she is underweight right there but she is healthy and fit??? SHould I worry about it or is it just a cofo. flaw??? She seem to be a little tender to it but not much.

Oh and here is her pedigree. http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/petes+matatari

the day i picked her up

Petesmatatari1.jpg

the rest are about 3 days after I got her....oh by the way i've had her about 3 weeks

IMG00133-20090730-1350.jpg

Aug209Tarirightside-1.jpg

Aug209Tariheadshotbetter-1.jpg

Aug209adie.jpg

MORE more recent pics.

sadiestanding.jpg

Edited by 4x4 Performance Horses

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Hey, i'm headed out for a quick overnight trip, i'll critique when i get home later tomorrow.

[smiley Wavey]

Bumper

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Ok, i just got stung by a dammed BEE while pulling weeds so i decided it was time to take a break. :happy0203:

The spot you are talking about almost looks like a roach back but it's fairly mild, so i'm not positive. I'm searching in my book...play elevator music while i search.

**dooby dooby doo, doo dooby dooby, dooby dooby doo...**

Ok, roach back, from my book: "A thin, sharp, arched up back is called a roach back."

This doesn't look like a roach back to me actually. So, let's move on.

When GT critiqued my gelding she talked about the croup and the SI joint. The peak of the croup is basically the top of the sacrum; the hip bones should be in line with or slightly ahead of the point of the croup. She said my gelding's hip bones sat "high and tight" to the SI (sacral illiac joint). In my book it goes on to describe it more.

If you look at the horse from the top, draw a line across the back from the point of each hip. Then feel along the backbone for a soft spot, a dip. This is the SI Joint. Ideally this joint is in line with the hip bones or slightly ahead of them. We can't see your horse from the top but we can see where her croup is and see that the loin is fairly long. What i think we're seeing here is just a long, somewhat weak, loin.

Here, i copied the picture and did lines on it. I couldn't visualize it, had to see it myself. Sometimes this just helps me.

4x4sMareCritique.jpg?t=1250800051

The croup is labeled, as is the loin and point of the hip. You can see that the point of the hip set in front of the croup where ideally it should be in line with the hip bones or just slightly ahead of them. In this mare's case she's a little long in the loin which weakens it some. The red line along the back leg shows us she's got great angles in her hind leg as the point of the buttocks lines up with the hock and the back of the cannon bone. Her hind pasterns are a bit upright however.

The blue lines show her hip and shoulder angles. The hip isn't too bad but her shoulder is a little steep. Her back is a little long (because of that loin) and her body thirds (orange lines) show that.

Honestly taken as a whole she's a very pretty mare with a slightly long back and steep shoulder. Easy things to work with actually. I'd say work on strengthening her back (and i'm drawing a blank on what exercises are best for this...ask on the barrel board perhaps, or training) and understand that those will be her weak spots, places she may get sore on or need help strengthening.

Bumper

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Long-time endurance riders have always told me to strengthen the back, long trotting is best advised. Lots and lots of long trotting. On an older horse that may be getting slightly sway backed, it will also help build the top line on them.

Not sure if that is what you are referring to but thought I'd throw that out there!

I need to get good confo picks of Jake and Shooter when the weather permits. I know Jake is sickle hocked but not severely and it definitely helps in planting his little butt in the dirt in hard stops and roll backs! Shooter is slightly U-necked but he sure looks LOTS better than he did ... OK, he's a little fatter now but he does look better! :happy0203:

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Great lines and info Bumper!

I just want to add that I believe I would call what the OP's horse has a mild Hunter's Bump or a Jumper's Bump. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

It's pretty common, but whether it causes a problem or not seems to vary a lot. Often once it heals there will still be a bump, but not real soundness issues. Long backed horses are thought to be more prone. There's also some disagreement about the cause.

Here's some info:

The Mystery of the Hunter's Bump

Blemish or Unsoundness

:smileywavey:

Edited by ExtraHannah

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Glad to be of assistance Bumper! Maybe it really is more common in hunters/jumpers. Probably 1/3 of the old lesson horses I used to ride had one. :confused0024:

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IDK about the back thing well, but I just wanted to say that my appendix's back feet can grow very uneven if not kept up constantly and when it happens, his left back hoof grows straight and his back will do that, it just throws it out. IDK if that could be any sort of possibility, but it is sore to them. fixing the growth of the feet and a chiro visit will fix it easily.

Shes very cute!

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