loseridiot91

Crazy Jumps?

Recommended Posts

I'm currently bringing up a lower level eventer that is terrified of any type of tricky fence. His owner didnt sound interested in taking him to a decent xcountry course to school so I was wondering what kind of jumps you guys would suggest to help him build up courage.

The stable he is kept at has very simple cross country jumps through novice so if you have any ideas of ways to spice them up I'd be very interested in hearing :smilie:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey! I'm fairly new here, but my friend and I will get sheets- just bedsheets, preferably with crazy patterns on them- and put them over the jump, starting with it folded up, and gradually spreading the sheet out, and securing it so it can't be blown up in my horses' face. It's a really good experience for the horses, and really builds up their confidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best thing I have learned to build a horses confidence over fences is to well jump fences. Take your horse to different grounds and practice on different cross country fences. School them over and over again.

Fences don't need to be these elaborate "spooky" looking things to build a horses confidence, most of the stuff around fences, like flowers at horse shows, the horse doesn't even pay attention to. The one who that spooks the most is the rider.

So as long as YOU are able to ride with a strong, supporting, encouraging leg, your horse will gradually gain confidence from you. Confidence comes through trust and exposure to multiple different types of fences (ditch, coop, table, water, log, rock wall, hay bails, roll top).

Don't try to make a spooky fence, I have never found that to be much help. All you are doing then is teaching your horse to do is jump a bed sheet, which you will never jump in competition.

Remember confidence takes years to build but only a second to take it a way. So jump safe, defined, honest questions and your horse will reward you with honesty.

Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The best thing I have learned to build a horses confidence over fences is to well jump fences. Take your horse to different grounds and practice on different cross country fences. School them over and over again.

Fences don't need to be these elaborate "spooky" looking things to build a horses confidence, most of the stuff around fences, like flowers at horse shows, the horse doesn't even pay attention to. The one who that spooks the most is the rider.

So as long as YOU are able to ride with a strong, supporting, encouraging leg, your horse will gradually gain confidence from you. Confidence comes through trust and exposure to multiple different types of fences (ditch, coop, table, water, log, rock wall, hay bails, roll top).

Don't try to make a spooky fence, I have never found that to be much help. All you are doing then is teaching your horse to do is jump a bed sheet, which you will never jump in competition.

Remember confidence takes years to build but only a second to take it a way. So jump safe, defined, honest questions and your horse will reward you with honesty.

Good Luck!

This is awesome advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't get me wrong- I agree with you, Barnrat, that there's no substitute for confidence and experience. However, I also believe that jumping over "spooky" jumps helps to build confidence- if you and your horse can get over a scary colored jump that may be slightly moving in the breeze, that says a lot, and I know it definitely built up my and my friend's and our horses' confidence. I also know that jumping over multi- coloured jumps builds confidence. When we have h/j shows at the barn I ride at, it's not the eventer's horses who are refusing the jump with the jump that's pink and blue and has Kokopelli men on it, or the jump that's painted to look like a western scene. It's the horses and riders who are used to more conservative colors on jumps. That would be a combination- because the horses/riders don't have the experience jumping over crazy jumps, they don't have the confidence to do so.

I'm not trying to offend anyone or anything, just trying to explain where I'm coming from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I think that most of the battle is the rider's idea that it's "scary" and the horse maybe doesn't?

We went to a CT this summer with a big solid gate that was painted funky colors. In big letters it actually said "Don't look down!" right on the jump! [ROTFL]

It was not an issue at all for most folks but it was really funny. I was actually laughing when I jumped it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sometimes I think that most of the battle is the rider's idea that it's "scary" and the horse maybe doesn't?

We went to a CT this summer with a big solid gate that was painted funky colors. In big letters it actually said "Don't look down!" right on the jump! [ROTFL]

It was not an issue at all for most folks but it was really funny. I was actually laughing when I jumped it.

Thats really funny. This year at a HT there was a jump what was a combination that was painted black, white, and red with stop signs and black spray paint on the stop signs that read "no stop". It was really funny. I love when course designers have sense of humor.

Appy, your not offending anyone. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but my main point was that what really makes a fence spooky is the riders perspective. Think back now to the most recent fence you have jumped that you have had a problem with. Before jumping it did you think you were going to have a problem with it? Why? Was it the shape? The color? The combination of it? The approach? Did you think it was outside of your horses capabilities? We create the problems (most of the times). When people try to throw stuff on fences to try to create problems for their horse, to try to elicit a response, they are cheating their horse as well as yourself by steal confidence away.

Bed sheets, plastic bags, any other "creative" spooky blowy stuff, sure, it can blow around and be "spooky", but in the first place if your horse has confidence in you and has exposure stuff blowing around them should not cause difficulties, but most importantly jumping over stuff that is designed to blow around can blow up (literally and figuratively). What if that bed sheet blew up around your horses legs and became entangled and caused a fall. Your confidence would be shattered as well as your horses. Why risk it? If you feel your horse is deathly afraid of the color purple, go spend $20 on some 2X4's and paint them purple. If you think your horse is afraid of rainbow colored jumps, paint them rainbow colored. But don't create a hazardous for your horse because it helps YOU feel more confident jumping.

Thanks BrownHorse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first got into eventing my trainer set up the "scary jump" lesson for me and my horse.

She got every random thing you could imagine and built odd looking jumps. Nothing was bigger than what he could safely walk over as to avoid any meltdowns. She used upside down laundry baskets (the super small ones with the holes) she used cones on their sides to give the depth of the hole, beach balls, patterned towels over everything, you get the idea. The first part we just walk over each jump, working up to trotting and then finally cantering over each. By the end of the lesson I felt I could point him at anything!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing is more scary than when your trainer puts a real American flag on a jump when the wind is at 40 mph and the flag is going INTO the jump. It is sticking straight out and making a "popping" noise from the wind! :twitch: It totally worked out though! [Yay]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now