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xcanchaserchicx

How Often Do You Worm?

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Since my pasture is a closed environment, my vet thought I'd be fine to deworm my horses every three months. I done it that way for a year now and haven't had any problems. I also rotate between Quest Plus, Strongid and Panacur.

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every two months...rotate...and the vet does the old fashioned tube thing once a year...I ask for it...she thinks I am overkilling on that one...probably am...but I like to know we clean the gut and start over...I picture a spring cleaned gut...and I feel better.

That's just me...holding onto old habits...i am an old fart...

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The biggest concern currently is that dewormers are facing resistant parasites. Deworming that frequent IF YOU DON'T NEED TO simply adds to that problem. The proper answer isn't how frequently DO you deworm, its how INfrequent can you deworm and still keep the horse parasite-free. That involves checking fecal exams.

For example, I've dewormed my mare religiously with Quest & Quest Plus alternating since I've had her, at the recommended every 3 month regime. Once I got her in foal, I didn't want to use the Moxidectin, so I've switched to Equimax. I realized I forgot to give the December dose, so I just checked a fecal sample. Lo and behold, she checked negative, so thus I am not deworming her until she's due to foal.

If you're doing appropriate pasture management with a closed "herd" situation, you should not need to deworm that frequently.

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but I like to know we clean the gut and start over...I picture a spring cleaned gut...and I feel better.

Right until all those encysted strongyles that WEREN'T killed by the tube deworming product (historically piperazine, which is mainly for roundworms, which are primarily a young horse problem...) emerge from the gut wall.

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**Loud praise for Dina*** Most people OVER worm their horses unnecessarily, which is almost as hard on the system as not often enough. DO the fecals periodically. You might just be surprised! Why spend more money than you have to?

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Yup, fecals and worm to fit your worm load.

Climate has something to do with it too. I live in a cold climate, i imagine we have far less of a worm load than someone in, say, Georgia or Texas or Florida. In general, i worm about every 4 months.

In fact, i need to take in some fecal samples soon.

Bumper

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Good point.

I have fecals done every spring and fall with vaccines.

I have mine getting done as often as they are because we're in a boarding situation with different horses coming and going from shows.

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I wormed my mare every two months when I had her. She was at a boarding stable and was turned out with several other mares daily - and there were different horses in the herd and barn often. I used the Quest tapewormer once in the fall. When I just had two horses by themselves I wormed every three months. I've always rotated wormers. :confused0024:

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I de-worm every two months with rotational anthelmetics. I would love to de-worm less other than I'm not convinced the other horse owners keep up their de-worming schedule.

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I deworm at first solid frost and sub freezing temperatures the don't deworm again till movement off winter quarters onto pastures. Once in between depending on weather/faecal/percieed risk. its sub zero here for a good solid 6 months with the majority in the -20 range so we don't worry about it during then up here. Work outs to about every 3 months during risk season.

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When you guys do fecals do you have your vet do them, or send them in somewhere? My vet is a farm call only vet, so even for her to do the fecal I have to pay the farm call to come and get it. I really hate having to pay almost $60 for a fecal.... Ive seen places online where its under $20, but wonder how accurate it is. Id do a fecal before I wormed EVERY time if It wasnt costing me almost $60...

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My vet promised to show me how to do a fecal (I have 2 different types of microscopes and want to learn), but I'm still waiting. If I can learn how to do that, I'll be doing that frequently, and adjusting the worming schedule by that. As it is right now, we worm every 2 months, and rotate. All the horses on this part of the farm are done at the same time, so we known who's been done, and when. We'll be doing more this year for pasture management, so that should also help.

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CVM,

I love your pro-opinions...

I am in Louisiana...by the Mississippi river. We have a borading facility and there are not always horses who are wormed properly...and I can't always know who is and who isn't.

Two are in pasture...80 acres...with about 10 to 15 horses at one time...but it rotaates as to who is who...but the number never rises. It is also shared with 20 cows, three mini donkeys (for the coyotes) and an old goat that thinks it is a cow, and a huge bull. Most of the time, the pasture is split, horses/cows...like right now.

I do the rotational chart my vet said was good for this climate and I use the name brands...we never really get a hard heat or a hard freeze...and things bloom and grow all year round (we have grass growing back now...and loaded with clover...so the ground is always active. Mosquitos year round...but just different degrees of bad.

Like I said...vet says I am being a worrier with the tube worming...she says my rotation is sufficient...but it can't hurt....says she doesn't do it...but she is not at a public facility, either. Only do it once a year or so...and only do it for peace of mind.

What will happen with the worms you say stay in lining? please tell me more. I will always do what is best for my horses and will take your advise strongly...I know you are sound advise.

Thanks!

Right now I can guarantee at least 9 horses and the three donkeys are properly wormed...the others are owned by people who cry money when it comes to doing right by a horse or maybe ignorant as which product to use when and how often....all the cows are wormed and deliced well..they are treated as royalty. The goat...I don't know....he is just there...not sociable and not owned by anyone, he came with the bull.

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What Dina is telling you is that tube worming is pretty much a useless expense. Has been for years.

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We deworm twice a year, spring and fall. More frequently specific to the horse if it goes someplace like for training or something; when it comes back, we lock it up in a corral for a week and deworm them before they are put back out. I do a fecal once a year, from a random poop pile in each field. We don't seem to have any issues doing it that way. We use bimectrin and zimectrin, I am thinking ... gotta look now!

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Had an intersting lecture in school today on antihelmintics and developing resistance from the pharmacology godess of the veterinary world. Talked alot about the high resistance in the lower states as she is from Alabama but a neat thing we were discussing was fecals. In most herd scenarios, 90% of the eggs/larvae on the pasture are being shed from 1 horse. She recommended doing fecals on the entire group and finding out who your shedder is and treating them heavily and the others much more lightly.

We were also discussing what the expectations of dewormers are. It is natural for all horses to have some degree of worms. She recommended keeping worm levels to the sub pathological level (~200/1gram of feces), but that zero parasite load as a goal will only encourage further resistance. Keeping a good population of larvae on the pasture helps decrease resistance development by increasing the genetic variation available to the parasites and encourages infection with susceptible pathogens vs. the resistant one.

Just some food for thought

If anyone is interested in hearing a podcast of this lecture please PM me and I will try to send you a copy next week once the profcast is posted.

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I deaworm every 2-4 months as needed rotating wormers. I read a lot reagrding deworming and the parasites being resistant to them. In the spring summer I deaworm more often than in the fall/ winter. When I first bought my horse I deawormed every 2 months, after getting the fecals done and going to summer every 2.5 months and in the winter every 3-4 months the fecals stayed the same.

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I deworm at first solid frost and sub freezing temperatures the don't deworm again till movement off winter quarters onto pastures. Once in between depending on weather/faecal/percieed risk. its sub zero here for a good solid 6 months with the majority in the -20 range so we don't worry about it during then up here. Work outs to about every 3 months during risk season.

Ditto, we do ours the same way.

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As some others have mentioned, there is no 'one size fits all', when it comes to deworming

Climate, age, living conditions and the horse's own level of resistence to parasitic infestation all come into play

As mentioned, some horses carry much higher worm burdens then their fellow herd mates, and must be dewormed more often

Only fecal counts will indentify these horses

Parasitic resistence is becoming a major concern, and is due in large part to the same thing as antibiotic resistence-over use when not indicated and under dosing . A tube size dewormer is not enough if your horse weighs more than the 1200 lbs or so it was designed for

Unlike antiobiotics, there are no new type of dewormers on the horizon, and this is a very big concern

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I'm really paranoid about using ivermectin, as my aussie somehow ingested some dropped ivermectin in June of 2007 and spend five days in ICU at our local vet school. I was lucky she survived and recovered to almost 100%. I only deworm away from home now, and I have the hardest time remembering to take it w/ me. My goal is ivermectin every 3 months, with the gold sometime in late fall. We do a fecal count every spring, and everyone has always had a very low load, so obviously it's a sufficient protocol.

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