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psmitty

Rare Disease Hits Horses In 12 States.

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MAN!! as if the horse industry can stand an other blow! geeeezzzzz... at least its just there,and hopefull contained! but that is going to put a damper on show-sales season! Especially if they don't know how its spred! But they have the best A&M woring on it thats good may be they'll get it resolved soon!

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Anyone breed to a King ranch Stud??? Shipped in semen???? Better get your horse tested

http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=15737

Equine piroplasmosis is caused by blood-borne parasites Theileria equi or Babesia caballi, which can be spread by some species of ticks, the use of contaminated needles, and possibly through blood-contaminated semen of infected stallions. The disease was officially eradicated from the United States in 1988; officials have screened all imported horses for piroplasmosis for nearly 30 years.

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Edited by Alaskandraft

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Scary stuff indeed. The article says that it is preventable, but doesn't say how. Off to search because Tx is CLOSE to us!

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Something to keep an eye on, but I feel horrible for the folks at King Ranch.

My family had a horse, sired by the racehorse Nashua, from them when I was pretty young. He was nasty tempered, but the most physically solid horse I've ever known.

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Half my horses were imported from Brazil where equine piroplasmosis is pandemic. I doubt it kills 20% of the horses in that country.

From the Merck Vet. Manual:

Equine babesiosis is caused by Theileria (formerly Babesia) equi or B caballi . T equi is a small parasite and is more pathogenic than B caballi . T equi was reclassified as a Theileria (see theileriases, Theileriases: Overview) in 1998. Equine babesiosis occurs in Africa, Europe, Asia, South and Central America, and the southern USA. It is transmitted by ticks of the genera Rhipicephalus , Dermacentor , and Hyalomma . Intrauterine infection, particularly with T equi , is also relatively common.

For additiona information see:

http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pd...roplasmosis.pdf

or

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/an.../piroplasmosis/

Some treatment options:

http://www.vet.uga.edu/VPP/clerk/edwards/index.php

You can protect your stock by controlling your rodent population. The primary disease vector is the tick. No rodents carrying the disease, no ticks to infect horses. The disease also does not do well in cold climates as freezing weather kills off the tick population in the winter. In Brazil only one state, Rio Grande do Sul, is considered to be relatively piro free.

The disease can be transmitted by infected semen.

It's a nasty disease but manageable in Brazil. I would guess we should be at least as smart as the Brazilians! :winking:

G.

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Clinical signs of equine piroplasmosis can include a host of nonspecific problems, such as fever or anemia, and some infected horses might appear healthy. Blood tests are needed to diagnosis the disease. The only treatment is a potent type of chemotherapy that can have serious side effects

Same article I posted earlier. The cure could be worse than the disease. It would kill off all the bacteria in a horses system I imagine leading to the horses death. I just thank god I don't have ticks here..nasty little creatures [Crazy]

Edited to add links to what it does to the inside of a horse

http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/c...e-piroplasmosis

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Edited by Alaskandraft

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This has been going on since 07. At the horse Expo in Ocala in 07, one of the clinicians, and his name escapes me now, had a young Zebra he was training and going to bring to the Expo. He was from texas but he was not allowed to enter Florida with the Zebra, so that part of the show was cancelled.

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What 12 states have been affected?

From the original article:

As of Jan. 20, 364 cases of equine piroplasmosis had been confirmed. Of those, 289 are on the sprawling King Ranch. The rest are scattered across Indiana, Texas, Alabama, California, Florida, Louisiana, Minnesota, North Carolina, New Jersey, Tennessee, Utah and Wisconsin, according to the World Animal Health Information System.

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ng to the store to buy my Pyranah spray...by the drum....

Going to the SPCA to get more feral cats....not really...we have 8...I don't even see a roach or worm around the barn anymore, so certainly not rats....not even a terd or two....but I will be vigilant.

I'll also post this in the barn message board and give a copy to my Brother....

calling my vet today, too...see what she says to do...

Thanks for the heads up....hope there is a vaccine soon......

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New Mexico has also had several cases that were mostly found through routine racetrack screening.

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Same article I posted earlier. The cure could be worse than the disease. It would kill off all the bacteria in a horses system I imagine leading to the horses death. I just thank god I don't have ticks here..nasty little creatures [Crazy]

Edited to add links to what it does to the inside of a horse

http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/c...e-piroplasmosis

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I've owned seven imported Marchadors and each was treated in Brazil for the disease before they were imported into the U.S. The treatment is similar in its effect to chemotherapy in humans (loss of weight, general loss of condition, sometimes sterility, etc.). It's not at all a fun thing, but neither is it a functional death sentence. None of the horses I've own ever had any long term sequellae. I know of one stallion that was rendered sterile by the treatment. I'm personally familiar with couple of dozen imported horses that were treated and only the stallion ever had a permanant disability as a result.

This is a Bad Thing, but the disease was well known in the U.S. prior to this event. It was likely one of the strains of disease known as "Texas Fever" that ravaged Kansas dairy herds during the era of the great cattle drives of the 19th Century. Some claim it was eradicated in the late '80s but all it takes is one infected mouse and few ticks to restart the process.

I wonder what the disease status of the King Ranch bovine herd is?

Again, this is not a happy event but is not Armageddon, either.

G.

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