Katie Schuur

My Son Got Lazy And Almost Killed My Horse Today.

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I also teach mine to tie by their necks, but only after they are well halterbroe and understand to give to pressure. and definitely not with a slip knot. Id rather have a loose horse than one strangling on a rope.

I think you did good. Son was lazy, tried to cut a corner on his chore and got the good hard lesson that cutting corners is a BAD thing and there are reasons that we do things a certain way. I bet he will have a flashback of this incident every time he thinks about taking a shortcut again.

I learned about horses on the ice the hard way. I was with Fire, my first real horse that was MINE. She has just got a new halter and I wanted to walk her down the driveway to show my hubby how cute she was. I didnt think about the ice across the entire back part of the property that got no sun all winter. She went down, took me down with her. Somehow we both ended up in the middle of a maybe 60' area of solid smooth ice. There was noone within yelling distance. She kept trying to scramble up and was continually falling and flailing and I just knew she was going to break a leg or her neck. Finally I drug myself off the ice, ran and got a heavy lunge line. I came back and skid across to her just as she fell again. I jumped on her and held her down and put my sweater on her head. This left me in my bra, in january, but like I said, noone was close enough to see or hear me. :ashamed0002: I got the lunge line hooked on to her and skid back to a solid area. She was finally worn out so she got into a sitting sort of position and let me drag her across the ice. She didnt try to stand until her front feet were on solid ground and I heaved her the rest of the way off the ice. I put my very cold sweater back on and I carefully walked her back. Aside from bruises, we were both ok, but I sure learned my lesson about ice that day!

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Thank you so much for all of your responses - I've enjoyed reading them. I'll never get the images out of my head though of Tuff in that situation. I felt so helpless for a moment, standing there saying "Tuff, NO! Tuff, NO!!" And then a light-bulb went off in my head and I told my son to get the knife.

Yesterday I didn't really bring the subject up with my son. I kind of gave him a day to spend alone with his thoughts without me bringing it all back up. He spent a lot of the day watching the Superbowl that I had recorded with the DVR, and since I never told him the outcome it was a lot of fun watching him cheer for the Saints, and laughing at the commercials. I then took him with me to Hastings because I told him that I wanted to buy a new Lady Antebellum music CD for myself (knowing this was one he was going to buy himself with allowance money). But today was a different day and the horses needed to be groomed again. I started putting my boots on to go outside, and I stopped myself. I called my son into the living room and asked him to please groom Sky and Tuff while I do the dishes in the kitchen. His face was BEAMING!! He seemed so happy that I asked him to groom the horses! I then said to him "Paul, I know I can trust you to do a good job with the horses. You're a good little horseman". I noticed his chin started quivering and his eyes were welling up, as if that was the one thing he needed to hear me say the most. He then held his head as high as he possibly could and headed out the door.

I'll admit I peeked at him through the kitchen window a couple of times though, LOL! But there was one question I'd been meaning to ask him all this time, and I'd just been waiting for the right moment. I asked him how come he didn't run into the house real quick to get me, instead of standing there screaming for me - freaking the horse out even more during that situation. He said it was because as soon as he realized what he had done, he wedged his hand in between the horse's neck and the rope trying to relieve the pressure on Tuff. Unfortunately though, it only managed to put him in danger of losing his hand once Tuff started panicking. He said it wasn't until the moment I got out there that he had freed himself. Now I kinda wish I didn't ask that question. I love my horses, but love isn't a strong enough word for how I feel about my kids. This could have turned out much, much worse than what it did - so I am saying a lot of thankful prayers tonight.

I debated whether or not to even post this thread. I kind of didn't want to feel like I was airing our dirty laundry. But now I'm really, really glad that I did. Many of you have posted responses, but many more have read this post as well. It's awesome to know that someone may remember this story next time they tie their horse(s) up :)

Edited by Rollin_after_a_bath

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Another good job mom! You restored his spirit and healed the shame he was heaping upon himself.

Edited by Chocomare

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Big ditto. Its not really "airing dirty laundry" as much as just sharing life experiences. Trust me, we ALL have those moments and its so nice to be able to share and learn from one another, rather than living in our little bubbles. I at least thank you for sharing, and now I have a new appreciation for tying by the neck and the dangers of doing so. Your story also reaffirned to me to always have my barn knife pretty handy :)

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It's never considered "airing dirty laundry" if it might help, or save a life in a similar situation that someone might find themselves in. There are days when we ALL take shortcuts here or there, and most of the time it goes unnoticed. But, all it takes is a split second and all he!! can break loose.

I personally want to thank you for sharing, and reminding us of some of the basic rules of pony parenting!

I think you handled this situation perfectly all the way around. [Huggy]

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Nope, not airing dirty laundry. It's like this:

Smart people learn from their mistakes.

WISE People learn from the mistakes of others.

:winking:

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It's a great story, and I appreciate you posting it. It just goes to show that a shortcut, taken by any one of us who knows better, can have terrible results. I'm really glad that both your son and Tuff are OK. I'm sure that your son has not only learned to always use a halter and a quick-release knot, but also to think about the possible things that could happen in any number of other situations.

The barn manager where I board instituted a rule for her lesson and camp kids last year....if you're caught leading a horse without a proper halter and lead rope, or if you haven't properly fastened the halter, you're done riding for the day...you can clean stalls instead..and that's your lesson. It's not meant to be a punishment, just a consequence...just as you established the consequences for your son's mistake. You're an exemplary Mom!

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The barn manager where I board instituted a rule for her lesson and camp kids last year....if you're caught leading a horse without a proper halter and lead rope, or if you haven't properly fastened the halter, you're done riding for the day...you can clean stalls instead..and that's your lesson. It's not meant to be a punishment, just a consequence...

Good for that BM!!!! [Jump]

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Nope, not airing dirty laundry. It's like this:

Smart people learn from their mistakes.

WISE People learn from the mistakes of others.

:winking:

I totally agree! You did good Rollin!

I also try and look at situations like this and figure out if there is anything I can also teach my horse from it. Maybe it's a new way I can teach a horse to give to pressure....or to lead from the neck (I teach my horses to lead by their mane as well as give and lower their head when I hold an ear). And to clarify, I'm NOT saying that Tuff's training is lacking in any way!! :)

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I think you handled the whole situation admirably from start to finish! Lesson learned, and everyone survived. Tuff is gorgeous!

I can testify to having a barn knife and knowing where it is. I thought I had done everything right. I tied the mare high, to a tree trunk, with a couple feet of slack and a slip knot. I went to the tack shed to get my brushes (20 feet away) and came out to a horse on the ground, hung by her halter. With that much pressure on the nylon lead there was no way that slip knot was slipping. Luckily I had a knife in the shed so I was able to quickly cut her loose. It's really scary watching them kill themselves.

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Thank you so much for all of your responses - I've enjoyed reading them. I'll never get the images out of my head though of Tuff in that situation. I felt so helpless for a moment, standing there saying "Tuff, NO! Tuff, NO!!" And then a light-bulb went off in my head and I told my son to get the knife.

Yesterday I didn't really bring the subject up with my son. I kind of gave him a day to spend alone with his thoughts without me bringing it all back up. He spent a lot of the day watching the Superbowl that I had recorded with the DVR, and since I never told him the outcome it was a lot of fun watching him cheer for the Saints, and laughing at the commercials. I then took him with me to Hastings because I told him that I wanted to buy a new Lady Antebellum music CD for myself (knowing this was one he was going to buy himself with allowance money). But today was a different day and the horses needed to be groomed again. I started putting my boots on to go outside, and I stopped myself. I called my son into the living room and asked him to please groom Sky and Tuff while I do the dishes in the kitchen. His face was BEAMING!! He seemed so happy that I asked him to groom the horses! I then said to him "Paul, I know I can trust you to do a good job with the horses. You're a good little horseman". I noticed his chin started quivering and his eyes were welling up, as if that was the one thing he needed to hear me say the most. He then held his head as high as he possibly could and headed out the door.

I'll admit I peeked at him through the kitchen window a couple of times though, LOL! But there was one question I'd been meaning to ask him all this time, and I'd just been waiting for the right moment. I asked him how come he didn't run into the house real quick to get me, instead of standing there screaming for me - freaking the horse out even more during that situation. He said it was because as soon as he realized what he had done, he wedged his hand in between the horse's neck and the rope trying to relieve the pressure on Tuff. Unfortunately though, it only managed to put him in danger of losing his hand once Tuff started panicking. He said it wasn't until the moment I got out there that he had freed himself. Now I kinda wish I didn't ask that question. I love my horses, but love isn't a strong enough word for how I feel about my kids. This could have turned out much, much worse than what it did - so I am saying a lot of thankful prayers tonight.

I debated whether or not to even post this thread. I kind of didn't want to feel like I was airing our dirty laundry. But now I'm really, really glad that I did. Many of you have posted responses, but many more have read this post as well. It's awesome to know that someone may remember this story next time they tie their horse(s) up :)

I will admit when I first read your original post of what happened, I thought "gosh, does she think more of her horse than her son?"

I know that answer now [Huggy]

Your a wonderful horsewoman and mother. I have something in my eye after reading this, and I think I learned something about being a mom too.

Your son sounds like a great young man, he just goofed a little and he's learned from it and thankfully neither he or Tuff were hurt.

I doubt if I would have handled it that well if it were one of mine, thanks for airing your laundry, I learned a good lesson.

[smiley Wavey]

I'm also a big Tuff fan, he's gorgeous!!!!

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Another good job mom! You restored his spirit and healed the shame he was heaping upon himself.

I agree.

Rollin, you definitely handled the initial situation better than I might have. My initial gut reaction in situations like that once everyone is safe is to completely come unglued on the person who made the mistake... especially if they knew better. I generally control that impulse and handle it in a diplomatic and calm manner even though on the inside i am kicking the tar out of the person responsible but in this case i might have just gone over the line a bit. Good for you for handling everything so well.

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Thank you soooo much... Everyone here is just the greatest, and you've all been so wonderful ever since day one when I posted here seeking help for this tiny, skinny little orphan about a year ago. You've all been there for me %100 of the way.

Today the weather was a little bit better, and to top it off - Paul came home from school in the best mood ever. THE "Amber" said she'd be his valentine. Yes - I mean THE Amber. The girl he hasn't stopped talking about since she sat down next to him in art class last year. So he's a pretty happy camper, and I told him I'd help him out in the valentine department as far as she's concerned, LOL!

Tuff had a great day as well. He played with his favorite toy for over an hour. Yep- over an hour!!!! LOL! I saw him playing with it when I was making breakfast, and then lunchtime rolled around and there he was.. Standing in the pasture still holding on to this ridiculous stick. [Crazy]

This morning, showing me his stick:

100_0681.jpg

About 30 minutes later, still walking around with that danged stick, giving me a "You can't have this stick" look:

100_0683.jpg

And again over an hour later, just standing there in the pasture holding the best thing ever invented (In his mind anyway). ETA: Scratch that... It's now 6 PM here and he still has this stick........

I wish I could just take a peek into the mind of a horse for one day, because I'd really love to know what's so special about that stick, LOL! I'm sorry he looks so scruffy in these pics in his "winter woolies". You can also see how dis-proportionate he is in his growth right now. He's pretty "downhill" so I am hoping he'll fill out and level-out after spring arrives. Currently he measures 14.2 at the rump, and the "string test" says that he should mature to about 15.3 - 16 Hands. I'll have to report later on about how accurate that might be. We'll just have to wait and see..

Edited by Rollin_after_a_bath

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How cute! I've seen our horses pick up sticks and chew on them as well as rocks and I was told this is quite possibly how horses in the wild "float" their teeth.

However ... I have a video up here on HC of Dusty and Beau with sticks and they certainly weren't using them for medicinal purposes! They were having a stick fight! They were actually hitting each other with the sticks ... pretty funny!

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Thank you soooo much... Everyone here is just the greatest, and you've all been so wonderful ever since day one when I posted here seeking help for this tiny, skinny little orphan about a year ago. You've all been there for me %100 of the way.

Today the weather was a little bit better, and to top it off - Paul came home from school in the best mood ever. THE "Amber" said she'd be his valentine. Yes - I mean THE Amber. The girl he hasn't stopped talking about since she sat down next to him in art class last year. So he's a pretty happy camper, and I told him I'd help him out in the valentine department as far as she's concerned, LOL!

Tuff had a great day as well. He played with his favorite toy for over an hour. Yep- over an hour!!!! LOL! I saw him playing with it when I was making breakfast, and then lunchtime rolled around and there he was.. Standing in the pasture still holding on to this ridiculous stick. [Crazy]

This morning, showing me his stick:

100_0681.jpg

About 30 minutes later, still walking around with that danged stick, giving me a "You can't have this stick" look:

100_0683.jpg

And again over an hour later, just standing there in the pasture holding the best thing ever invented (In his mind anyway). ETA: Scratch that... It's now 6 PM here and he still has this stick........

I wish I could just take a peek into the mind of a horse for one day, because I'd really love to know what's so special about that stick, LOL! I'm sorry he looks so scruffy in these pics in his "winter woolies". You can also see how dis-proportionate he is in his growth right now. He's pretty "downhill" so I am hoping he'll fill out and level-out after spring arrives. Currently he measures 14.2 at the rump, and the "string test" says that he should mature to about 15.3 - 16 Hands. I'll have to report later on about how accurate that might be. We'll just have to wait and see..

That is the coolest horse on the planet!!!! Let me know when your cloning him, I'm in [Jump]

Again, I think your story is worth sharing, I doubt I would have handled it so well. I tend to scream at my son, forgetting he's a kid with feelings and hurt that last's forever.

I just loved the stick, something my old appy would have done. Personality and looks, your a lucky woman!!!

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[ROTFL] Love the donkey in the second pic. He's got the look of "You have GOT to be kidding me..... :rolleye0014: ... " [ROTFL]

I love Tuff. He's such a handsome guy, and I remember when he was the wee little skinny scrawny pathetic looking thing. It was hard NOT to feel sorry for him. He really has grown up and filled out. He looks great.

Edited by Zeusyboy

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