Shriest

A Broken Mare

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taken directly from your blog.....

I?ve only owned her for two weeks and we knew that she had a few issues. She was rescued from a kill pen at an auction. She had bucked me about a week ago but it was nothing bad. She just seems rather confused. The woman who gave her to me was a nervous rider and she only rode English.

sometimes the horses in the kill pens were there for a much deeper reason than what seems visible to the eye...

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You sound like you don't have a lot of confidence in yourself or your abilities? You probably have more training ability than you think. Do you have any friends that are experienced riders/trainers that might be willing to help or at least give advice? It might be a little pricey, but Clinton Anderson has a great DVD collection that could help both you and your horse. Don't give up and forget the naysayers. If you love this horse, then anything is possible. But remember to put your safety first.

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I bought a quarter horse cross mare about a month ago. The woman had said that she was an English rider and that the horse was trained western, and she just felt like she was confusing her. I took my cousin with me when we went to look at her and he hopped on her while we were there. Well, she tried to buck him. The woman was shocked. They always are!She said she had never seen her do this before.Of course not We thought at the time it was because she didn?t like men. The woman had stated that the mare hated her husband. Proably because the husband was willing to set some boundaries.

Well we got her home, the woman ended up just giving her to us because she felt so bad about the bucking (I have a feeling that the bucking wasn?t a new thing to her). I think you might be right.The next day I took her for a ride. She seemed a little barn sour, and just wanted to keep heading back. When I tried to make her go where I wanted her to go she would try and turn the other way. When I wouldn?t let her be lead she would try to spin her head around and bite me. This we managed to fix. Though that same day she tried bucking me. She didn?t throw me but this was the first time I had ever been bucked so I was a little freaked and got right down. Which I now realize I shouldn?t have done.

Well almost two weeks ago now I was riding her after a few days of rain. Something in the woods spooked her and she took off up the hill in the field at a full out sprint. To me gallop doesn?t even cover the power she put into this run. Well as she reached to top of the hill, in the middle of the field, I felt her body go all funny then she raised both front legs slammed them down while throwing up her back legs, and over the saddle I went. She how ever didn?t miss a beat and kept running.

Well, one broken leg later I?m wondering if she is worth dealing with. Not for you.Other than while riding she has a sweet personality. But my cousin tried riding her the day after I went in for surgery and she tried to throw him. And has bucked every time he has tried working with her since. Though she wont do it when he lunges her, even with a saddle on her.

Black_magic_by_Assia_Raven.jpg

This is her on a good day. I had no issues with her what so ever that day. She did every thing that I asked her to with no complaints.

What is she crossed with? A giraffe??? HOLY Hannah!

In all seriousness, if you mean to keep this horse as anything other than a pasture pet, I strongly suggest that you save your sheckles and invest in a professional HORSE trainer and some riding lessons for yourself. While I'm sure you do a fine job with the dogs or part-dogs you have, and I will give you the point that training theory is training theory, beyond theory is the fact that horses do not learn like dogs do and will not respond to the same stimuli that dogs will. This horse has already learned how to "win" against humans. She will get worse before she gets better. It will be done more efficiently and safely by a person who is familiar with training horses.

It's not "giving up" on an animal to recognize you do not have the skill sets or resources to manage a horse like this mare. Would you recommend a high percentage wolf cross to someone who had never owned a dog before?

My grandma had a saying: "It's just as easy to love a rich man as it is to love a poor man". In this case, it's just as easy (likely easier) to keep a horse that is broke and good minded as it is to keep an un-civilized, un-social and tempermental horse such as the one you have now. A horse that has a good personality, has one all the time, not just when it suits them.

Stay safe, and don't let your pride get in the way of carefully evaluating what to do with this mare.

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But remember to put your safety first.

The mare has already caused her to break her leg. I think the safety first went right off the saddle when the mare bucked her off to cause the injury.

This is not a horse for a beginner learning off tapes to try and re-train, this mare is not for an intermediate rider, but like I stated previously this mare needs to go to a PROFESSIONAL that can deal with her.

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like everyone said, please find help! i dont think this horse is quarter. it probably is a more hot blooded breed. its very skinny. & how high shes holding her head is either your death grip on the reins or an ill fitted saddle. & this horse needs to go back into a snaffle & have a lot of round pen work & a wet blanket every time. a horse that runs off blindly is a DEADLY horse. please get help, or take that horse right back to the woman & tell her she falsely represented this horse by saying it never bucked. no horse is worth your live.

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You have only ridden, as you said so yourself, easy laid back horses.

You have NO TRAINING EXPERIENCE WHAT-SO-EVER. That is how this horse got the way she is. Are you planning on spending about 5 or 6 years apprenticing under a trainer so you can LEARN HOW TO TRAIN?

If not, and you insist on getting on this mare so she can use you as a lawn dart, please have someone post when she kills you so we can send condolences to your family.

If you want to REALLY do the right thing by this mare, stay off her. The more you ride her, the better she will get at throwing you.

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In your photo, Equi, your horse is bracing against your hard and heavy hands. She needs to be in a snaffle, on a loose rein. Her whole posture is defensive and tense. You need to understand that you were sitting there, waiting for somebody to take your picture, and the whole time you were putting quite a bit of pressure on that poor horses mouth!!! I would buck you off too!! I am not trying to be mean but I love horses and it pains me to see one handled in ignorance. Please don't take offense, but go seek some knowledge.

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I can feel the horses pain . That gullet is sitting directly on that horses withers. Owie..

edited to change that!! I cant belive I put cantle!!!!

my mind sometimes...lol..I seen this Spud Shuttle yesterday...I asked caleb did you see that Shud Puttle!?? He's Like What was that again??

Edited by Flying Stars

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This is not like getting a kid a pet and then the kid doesn't want to take care of it.

This is like getting a pet for your kid, then the pet BITES the kid's face off, and you say "poor puppy, I knew what we were getting into when we got the puppy"

I appreciate your situation. I had a mare like this. Is your life worth this mare? There are THOUSANDS of amazing horses out there - this mare isn't one of them.

If you were somewhat experienced I'd say go for it, give it a shot. But without knowing how to train a horse (and I'm not saying I do myself), you are setting yourself up for disaster. And alot of pain.

If you don't want to send the mare to slaughter, take the money that you will eventually spend on medical bills in the future on yourself (because this horse just might put you in the hospital again) and have her euth'd.

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if you all want to keep chatin here go right ahead, but this will be my last time on this thread.

Thanks to those who actually gave me advice on re-training her, and not just jabbered on about how i should have her killed (either put down or sent to slaughter) or make her someone else problem.

I am keeping her, and I am going to be working with her.

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if you all want to keep chatin here go right ahead, but this will be my last time on this thread.

Thanks to those who actually gave me advice on re-training her, and not just jabbered on about how i should have her killed (either put down or sent to slaughter) or make her someone else problem.

I am keeping her, and I am going to be working with her.

Good luck. You need it.

Bumper

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if you all want to keep chatin here go right ahead, but this will be my last time on this thread.

Thanks to those who actually gave me advice on re-training her, and not just jabbered on about how i should have her killed (either put down or sent to slaughter) or make her someone else problem.

I am keeping her, and I am going to be working with her.

I am not saying to have her euthed, sent to slaughter, and sending her to a trainer is not making the mare someone else problem. There is nothing wrong with sending a horse to a trainer. It doesn't make a person any more or less of a horsman or women.

Edited by Duns of Impact

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if you all want to keep chatin here go right ahead, but this will be my last time on this thread.

Thanks to those who actually gave me advice on re-training her, and not just jabbered on about how i should have her killed (either put down or sent to slaughter) or make her someone else problem.

I am keeping her, and I am going to be working with her.

Pride: 1

Sense: 0

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What did you want people to say? Oddly enough the people who need help the most are the hardest to help.

I stick to my opinion, I'm on the horses side, and for her sake get a saddle that fits and use a bit that won't scare and hurt her. Get some lessons and learn how to ride. There is no answer here that will help if you can not recognize the problem.

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There is nothing wrong with sending a horse to a trainer. It doesn't make a person any more or less of a horsman or women.

I agree with this completely!

In my opinion...this is a good example of something I've always been taught and called.. RAK. Recognizing, Accepting, and Knowing your limitations and abilities. These are the things that add to making great horsemen and women. Along with good common sense and patience Sending a horse to a trainer is not just dumping the horse off on someone else as a "problem". It's showing sensibilities in knowing the horse may be too much for *you* to handle ( "you" being used generally speaking) If you are confident in your abilities as a rider to fix the issues...thats fine. But I don't think that's the situation. You have already recieved a major injury from her. I don't suggest for you to give up on her yet...but use you're resources. Recieve lessons, read books, work with trainers. Pride is an awful thing...and can be more damaging than anything else. Common sense and recognizing, accepting, and knowing your limitations are the best tools if you REALLY want to actually HELP this horse.

Please be aware though, not every horse can be saved. I wish you good luck and hope you remain safe.

Edited by spanish_walkin_wannabe

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I've missed the first post and this. In case you are around to read, I wanted to offer a bit of advice.

No one likes to be told they may not be quite as skilled in something as they think. It seems a blow to the ego, and defensive tendencies go up. This group here at HC sees a lot of horse people, from all levels. You have taken a step farther than a lot of real life horse people by moving outside of your circle of knowledge to solicit advise. So please step outside your hurt feelings and read through some of the shocked responses.

Some horse people no longer travel in the circles of the "just for fun" horse people. They forget that people may not know that they don't know.

Shreist, you don't know. This isn't a bad thing. It is an honest thing. There are things about horses that you just don't know. Your posts and your picture tells us this. The only way to learn what you are going to need to know to help this horse is to talk to and hang out with other horse people.

Everyone has an opinion and it is worth listening to them all, then figuring out which peices of advice work for you.

The biggest piece of advice I can recomend is to find a GOOD trainer in your area and start with some lessons. Hang out with them at their barn and see what you can pick up. You'd be surprised what you'll learn just by spending the day with them. Pay your $50 for a lesson, then ask if you can hang out and help clean stalls. Watch them ride the other horses, give other lessons. Look at the tack they use and how their horses travel.

Were you down here, I'd say come by and hang out with us.

I was you once. I didn't know that I didn't know. I was firm in my belief that I was an accomplished horse person. I knew that anyone who tried to tell me what to do was just being mean. I was wrong. There is always more to learn with horses. I continue to take lessons so I can train my own horses, and I've been riding now for almost 30 years.

Trainers and lessons are not the devil. I sure as heck know that training isn't cheap and trying to put a horse in a trainer's barn can break the bank. So don't ride your mare yet. Take lessons at least twice a month, more if you can afford it. Talk with the trainer about your mare and start to workout a game plan with him/her.

If you'd like advice and help in finding a legitimately good trainer who won't take advantage of you, feel free to ask.

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its called tough love kid. we are worried about YOUR safety. most of us here have had experiences with this type of horse, it is dangerous even for the most experienced horsemen let alone a rookie. & alot of us are seeing red over the woman who sold you this horse. its a knee jerk reaction. now be a big girl and listen up, GET HELP. we cant help you on a forum your going to need a living breathing professional, that does not include your cousin, to help you so no one gets hurt. dying sucks & being in a wheel chair sucks worse.

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if you all want to keep chatin here go right ahead, but this will be my last time on this thread.

Thanks to those who actually gave me advice on re-training her, and not just jabbered on about how i should have her killed (either put down or sent to slaughter) or make her someone else problem.

I am keeping her, and I am going to be working with her.

That is a shame, really. You will not magically turn this horse around, as fastfilly said, You don't know what you don't know. If you feel that you have to do this You ARE GOING TO HAVE TO SPEND SOME MONEY - go get some- borrow it, work it off or get a second job, since you are very dedicated to this horse, I am sure you have the motivation, send this horse to a respectable, knowledgeable trainer.

If you still think you can do this on your own, and that somehow you haven't properly conveyed the extent of your training skills to us all here, well then, why did you ask for our help?

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Great Post Spotted but the OP isn't about to get a trainer. She stated she couldn't afford to send the horse to a trainer. She has no money for a trainer.

Free horse was in the budget though.

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I think what you're not understanding is that the people on here are VERY helpful. They don't want to see you injured or killed by this horse. They've seen it. They've lived it. And they know that green+green= black and blue. You've already experienced this.

This mare is not for you to fix. You don't have the experience.

If you don't have the $$ for a trainer or lessons, how do you suggest you are going to train her? A book? A dvd? Free internet advice? This problem is FARRRR beyond reading some information and trying to apply it.

Its in-person, hands-on training with a professional.

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it saddens me as well, that the OP did not get the answers she wanted to hear. the honest truth hurts(emotionally) sometimes. but not using common sense hurts(phsyically) much worse

this whole situation scares me... someone "rescued this horse from kill pen" and got in over their head. in turn giving the OP a "free" horse.. there is nothing free about a horse with a ton of issues that create huge medical bills. who knows, what if that mare was in the kill pen for a reason.. what if she killed someone not skilled enough to deal with her, and the owner/owners family couldnt bring them selves to euth her?? without some serious help, training, and lessons, it could very well be the OP in that position.. VERY EASILY.. thats the part that truely scares me.

taking pride in trying to finish a project that was started is one thing.. but pride overriding common sense and self preservation is down right ignorant and deadly, especially when it comes to horses..

everyone on this board started out green as grass.. some as youngsters, others older.. but EVERYONE starts green.. it takes time(years and years), determination, and alot of blows to the ego before one becomes experienced.. the most experienced horse people i have met realize there is ALWAYS someone to learn from other people and horses. wether it be how NOT to do things, or little time saving tricks, theres something new to learn every day. one never stops learning unless they think they know everything or outright refuse to learn.

Edited by equi-librium

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I bought a horse a few years ago. Was supposed to be a good trail horse. And mind you...he was....until you asked him to go away from the other horses and/or actually do something. He got pissy, reared, bucked. This is a horse I bought for my mom and husband (totally green riders) to ride. He was supposed to be my second horse one that was already trained and knew how to "take care" of its rider. I didn't have the time to invest in him and quite frankly he didn't have the right attitude to be carrying my two prized people in my life whether he had formal training or not. Come to find out prior owners husband had "learned" how to ride him from dvds and watching things on tv, with no help from his wife because she thought it better for their relationship that way. Well after 7 years of him "learning' how to ride this horse, this horse learned a lot of "RANK" behavior. I listed him honestly. Told the lady he needs work and he is for an experienced rider. She has someone to help train him and I was comfrotable with that so I sold him to her. My point is sometimes it really just doesn't work out. We all wish we could save all of them, but sometimes their past experiences have left them too damaged. Please think about this....its taken this horse years to learn the behaviors she's learned....it's going to take years to change these habits and her opinion towards work. It is going to take you working with this horse every day for at least 6 months to even start to see some improvement in my opinion. I do wish you luck and I hope you realize that you can find her a good home to someone who has more resources to invest in her. If that isn't possible, this horse's best solution may very well be euth. I hate to say that...I am pro animal here, but your life is not worth it....is it?

Donna

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Prancer - I had a similar horse I got from a rescue. She was advertised as just grumpy - no - she didn't have much training or if she did, she didn't want to work. She was fine for mosey-ing (sometimes) but asking her to do ANYTHING was out of the question. And like you, she was meant as a husband horse for beginners to ride.

I have been casually looking for another horse, and it KILLS me that some are advertised as "broke for trail riding" - --- screams to me "won't do anything". which stinks because some of them might be great trail horses. But it makes me nervous that they won't do much else than follow another horse around.

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I'm throwing stones in glass houses here because I speak from experience.

The last time I started a horse up until 4 years ago was 20 some years before that. The last time I had to re-adjust the attitude of a horse like yours, and mine, was before that.

In my case, the horse's attitude was my fault because I had the opportunity to take her off the breeder's hands (she was boarding her for me for almost nothing) several times in the two years prior to my finally bringing her home.

I got a mare that put me under our trailer the first time I tried to tack her up, headstall and shanked bit were her meltdown point. I got a mare that charged, turned her arse and tried to double barrel me. I got a mare that invaded my space and shoved when I pushed back. I got a mare that challenged me every flippin' step of the way on every single thing.

It took nearly four years of hard cussin' work to get her to where she has reasonable ground manners and doesn't meltdown with a headstall and bit. Basically, I had to re-start her and it was a hundred times harder, even with expert help, that to have started her right in the first place.

I had a place for her on the kill buyer's truck and gave her two weeks with me and a local guy who is a national champion roping and cutting trainer. If we didn't make sufficient progress she was on her way to Canada. Something finally clicked and she's still here because I won't turn her over to just anyone. Her next owner is going to have to work with us for a while before she goes home with that person.

Her behaviour was my fault, I had the opportunity to get her under my care before she was allowed to get this bad. I didn't.

That's where your situation differs. You didn't have the opportunity to get this mare before she was ruined. And she is ruined because there will always be that little kernel deep down inside where she'll try testing her handler because she got away with it before.

If you can't invest in a trainer, get rid of her. She's already injured you, which tells me I've been luck as well as I may have enough experience to know what to watch for where you may not.

The next time, she may not injure you. I have some experience and there were times with the mare I have that our trainer and my hubby thought one of us was going to kill the other.

You can't fix all of them. You really can't and as a pasture pet, a mare like this is likely just as dangerous on the ground as she is under saddle.

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I was you once. I didn't know that I didn't know. I was firm in my belief that I was an accomplished horse person. I knew that anyone who tried to tell me what to do was just being mean. I was wrong. There is always more to learn with horses. I continue to take lessons so I can train my own horses, and I've been riding now for almost 30 years.

Ditto this...You dont know what you dont know you dont know. this is the hardest lesson to learn but once you do, you will become teachable and progress much further in your horsemanship as you search for knowledge.

Edited by Trinity

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What I see is a young lady that is making a bad decision based on emotions and her heart. She will end up getting hurt or killed by this horse because as everyone has said, she has no idea what she is dealing with. As we all have had to find out through the years there is a difference between dangerous and a confused or uneducated horse. Sounds like this one is comparable to a career criminal, their spots don't change and they have to be under constant supervision and control. The habits are ingrained and stuck in their head.She will have a constant up hill battle that this horse will size her up and take full advantage. Esculating the problems to new levels each time. Even as a pasture fixture it will be a battle when this horse decides to take control on the ground as well. If she is wise she will at least SPEAK with a GOOD trainer and I would wager the trainer will suggest this horse is not suitable for her skill level. The sad part is if she seeks a trainer that is only in it for the dollar. They will bleed her dry and she will end up with the same problems and a lot less in her bank account. But the big danger is her thinking this horse will be fixed and she will get perhaps careless or over confident in decisions when handling this horse.

You have stated you can't afford a trainer, but have decided risk your saftey with this horse, I truly hope you make better decisions in other aspects of your life than this. You have a choice here to make a logical decision. I sincerly hope you make the right one for your sake.

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