Sign in to follow this  
Hawktree

Natural Hoof Trimming Clinic

Recommended Posts

I went to a hoof trimming clinic not knowing what to expect - it was not a Pete Ramey trim but the info was so good and the results were great. I'll give you the Reader's Digest Version - ask if you want more info on something.

The instructor was a certified natural trimmer and uses Jamie Jackson's method of trimming - found in the AANHCP Guidelines. There were six paid students and about 7 return students. The instructor has a successful trimming practice and when she moved from the Minneapolis area - her clients joined together to fly her back every two months so she could continue trimming their horses.

We started out by examining the anatomy and lower leg bones of a number of different horses. Then we were taught the trimming method. The foot is trimmed to the medial plane. What this means is that the P1, P2 & P3 are always where they belong - it's the hoof capsule that is malleable or moves. Since the frog is a mirror of the coffin bone and is where it belongs - that's the medial/middle plane - that's the guide - always.

1. Draw a line from the apex of the frog to where it's pointing. Follow that line back through the central sulcis - then make a line across the heels - they should be perpendicular. This picture shows a balance foot.

100_3642ex.jpg

If they are not square - they are unbalanced. Like this one - right heel is to high (this is a cadaver hoof) -

100_3662ex-1.jpg

After trim - 100_3668ex.jpg

You don't use the collateral groove or hairline - just the medial plane or frog. Look at how the heel bulb has bounced back - even on a cadaver foot.....

2. She also balances front to back - we did measure angles but not to attain any particular angle but when lowering the toe/heel you don't want to make more than a 2 degree change.

And yes, she does believe in rasping into the sole to shorten a long toe or balance a hoof. (This was so difficult for me to get over because it's so against what we say on this board but seeing is believing and her 14 horses had the most balanced, sound feet you can imagine.) Not only did I rasp the sole of one of her horses - I've rasped the soles of two of mine and they were just fine - not lame, not ouchy, nothing.... When lowering the toe - I was taught to rasp level with the sole - not a bevel type of shortening. Of course, not all horses need this but mine did - my previous 1 1/2 year of trimming attempts had left me with long toes and the start of underrun heels.

3. Heels - 100_3688.jpg100_3689.jpgI have lots of pictures of heels - but basically - the back of the heel is the highest point and she starts her quarter scoop from the back all the way to the toe quarters. And you want a scoop - enough to fit a credit card under but not a huge swoop - that means that the toes or heels are out of balance/long. And we didn't necessary lower the quarters all the way to the sole.

4. Bars - important - she removes the bars all the way to the heel platform - creating harmony in the bottom of the hoof - this allows for good hoof mechanism and expansion.

100_3673.jpg

5. Mustang roll - same as what MC describes.

6. Leave 'em be for at least 3 weeks but better yet - four or more weeks. She has two horses that self trim - one has never been trimmed and the other hasn't been touched for 4 years - perfect coronet bands and strong feet. We rode these horses in the slate covered hills of South Dakota.

That's the highlights - lots more info but this will do for now.

Edited by Hawktree

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool! It sounds like it was a very beneficial clinic for you! Sounds like there was lots of good hands on work too. DId she supply cadavers for all the people at the clinic?

Only thing I dont like is the tone that she has absolutes with horse feet? One thing everyone needs to keep in mind about anything horse related, is there are no absolutes. For example that every horses foot wants to be balanced according to our set standards. This is actually funny timing because onegrayhorse (now 4MeAmigo) put up a thread last night about how she has been trying to get her mares feet right by trying to fix the sheering heel balance to make them level, and how despite all this time of being level, the hoof is only looking worse and worse. That is because not all horses conformation wants the hoof to be level to our standards. You have to trim to what the sole is telling you, the heel balance is only 1 part of the whole puzzle, if the heel balance doesnt fit the individual hoof, none of the other parts fit either.

Edited by audrey-mae

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Justice the instructors name is Cynthia Niemala - she was so knowledgeable - and we asked a ton of questions. It was so fun to talk feet for three days! She's offering another clinic in June or July. She's also an instructor at a class called - http://www.liberatedhorsemanship.com/

Audrey-mae - OneGray is the reason I finally got up the courage to post my experiences. I thought it might be to controversial but after looking at her pictures - I realized it may be helpful to her. And I'm not sure how my explanation came across but Cynthia doesn't have absolutes - she balances the foot that is in front of her - heel to toe. I'm sorry if I made it sound any other way.

Here's how Gray's foot would look using this technique - I forgot to add the line across the toe but it's the same principle. You can see that it's high on the left side heel. I trim conservatively and take a picture and draw my lines to see how I'm doing. I'd also have her remove the little bar in front of the heel platforms. And start her quarter scoop at the back of the heel. Create better harmony in the hoof.

lft1-2.jpg

And yes, we had 39 cadaver feet to work on - so thankful for those hooves. Plus we trimmed the instructor's horses - about 10-12 of them.

The instructor has dealt with all of the problems that any trimmer would see and has been very successful in dealing with them using her trim method. She explains all of this way better then I could ever do....

Edited by Hawktree

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So how do you balance a foot if the frog isn't point to the center of the hoof? How do you get it to point to the center of the hoof?

you cuss and yell at it till it straightens up and acts right. the same technical works on kids too :happy0203:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you cuss and yell at it till it straightens up and acts right. the same technical works on kids too :happy0203:

Wow- where have you been all my life. Here I have been reading all sorts of stuff, looking at pics, talking to people, AND I went to college to be a teacher. If I had found this site earlier, I could have saved so much time and money!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hawk I hear ya. I SUCK big time at explaining stuff lol. I think its awesome you had the opportunity to go to this clinic! I would jump on any chance at a clinic put on here! Do you know where she got all those cadaver legs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kids - If Justice's method doesn't work how about this... :grin:

If the frog is off center - it's still the medial/middle plane of the hoof and you balance to that. And let it grow - the hoof capsule will move & the frog will once again be "straight" (if it's suppose to be straight - most do but not all) as it grows. It's really quite amazing to me how this works. Then the next time you trim - you trim to it's new position. Don't force it - just balance the foot.

Here's an off center frog -

100_4188EX.jpg

See that the heel lines are not perpendicular - to get a square or 90 degree angle on this line the the right heel would have to be lowered just a tish - but the toe quarter line looks pretty square so I'd just lower the heel and make sure the quarter is cleared/slightly scooped and take another look.

Audrey - I don't know where she got her feet but have you checked with your vet or local rendering company?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cynthia Niemala? She's from my area in northern MN....or was. I contacted her when I was first looking for a barefoot trimmer, about 3 years ago. She said she had taken the course in Strasser in 2003, but changed her methods.

She was WAY expensive, though. I think she was charging $175 to do the first trim on one horse, but she would also teach how to trim, and included photos. After that the trims were $80 per horse. I suppose with the education, it wasn't that bad, though.

I decided that combined with the Strasser (even though she said she didn't do that anymore), and the price, I went with someone else.

ETA: Because I went back in my emails and found out what the situation was exactly.

Edited by Wild Rose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wild - she moved to Rapid City, SD a few years ago. And your right, she is Strasser certified but doesn't follow their methods - hasn't for over 8-9 years. I just figured that gave her even more knowledge about the hoof and it's mechanics.

I would have thought twice about paying that for a setup trim too - but she is good and will teach you how to maintain her trim so that may be part of it. But I'm glad you found someone to help you....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'm glad to hear that she is now giving clinics. We need more and more people instructing on barefoot trimming. And finding out what is NOT good is all part of it.

Edited by Wild Rose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since the frog is a mirror of the coffin bone and is where it belongs - that's the medial/middle plane - that's the guide - always.

Is this a hoof "constant" or are there situations where this may not be true?

Did you change anything else about your trimming after the clinic?

I am glad you shared your experience because there is always so much learning that happens when we share ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Triimming the bars out so severely is VERY Strasser...Called for sometimes? Maybe...All the time? Nope...

And as far as rasping into the sole, you may get away with that on a horse with adequate sole depth (which the collateral groove will tell you) but on a flat footed horse, you will not. There has to be knowledge there and a plan. Live sole to me is not to be touched but there is a differnce between live sole and excess not yet shed sole. Its case dependant and I most always can get the foot to shed it on its own with no trimming needed. It IS about bar management however.

I completely agree that the hoof is a floating capsule around fixed bone and trimming to the frog is what i personally do generally anyways with amendments made depending on the situation. The frog is most important structrue of the foot IMO as everything else hinges on its comfort, Use and health. Everything holds each others hand all around the frog.

This trimmer may be to the point where she feels she can force (my opinion of forcing is extreme trimming all at one time) a foot to her ideal faster than it wants to come, but this is DANGEROUS ground to all but the MOST knowledgeable and not for backyard trimmers IMO. There are many pathological feet that will not be forced in this way and stay sound. Knowing the difference is key. Having a plan is key.

I have seen Pete trim sole. Sometimes it IS necessary....But knowing WHEN is a big part of this. Slipperly slope dangerously close to strasser beliefs with alot of potential to go wrong.

Edited by Trinity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trinity, removal of the bars sent a red flag up, flying in the wind, for me, too. Now that you mention it I remembered I was going to comment on that. Then I saw the name of the person, and went off on that tangent!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I could explain this as well as she does but I can't - I'm just learning it but I wish you could talk to her. Here's a picture of how far from blood you are - I've already rasped this toe/sole shorter and then for a visual - cut the hoof back to try find blood.... As far as your concern about a thin soled horse - I'll ask her - I'm pretty sure she's not going to lame him but will balance that hoof as it is that day.

100_3692.jpg

She would never force a foot to any certain parameter - we had this conversation and I can tell you she is very patient. She balances the hoof in hand and let's it grow - than balances that hoof.

I knew as soon as the word Strasser came out - that would be what people focused on. But this is modeled after Jamie Jackson's trim not Strasser. So please look beyond any predetermined thoughts about a Strasser trim. She's trimmed over 4000 feet - please give her some respect. It's my attempt to relay her method that's falling short - not her method.

I understand this is different from how you trim but she is also a very successful trimmer and does not hurt her clients horses - or she wouldn't have any.

These are pictures of her bar trimming - she is not cutting deep into the sole - merely creating a smooth surface to increase hoof mechanism.

100_3684ex.jpg

100_3707.jpg

I guess I don't understand the furor over rasping into the sole - when I pumice off a callous on my feet or hands - they aren't sore. And when I've rasped into my horses soles - they don't pull away in pain or walk off limping. I'm not doing it willy nilly but I am giving them a balanced hoof -

Edited by Hawktree

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never disrespected this trimmer although I am not impressed with this method. I dont follow any "name" either, I use what works.Pete happens to be relevant to my area because he is also in the same terrain and envorionment so I find him very relevant.

If you trimmed horses this way in my area, they WOULD be sore for several days or weeks even. It is rocky here. I ride on rough trails. My now sound horses who have longer bars WOULD be lame. I know this because I experimented with exactly what she is doing after reading about it from a Strasser trimmer.....

If you pumice off my callouses on my feet, Sure, I can walk on my carpets perfectly well and even my decks, grass, dirt, sand and so forth. I could no longer walk on my pointy driveway gravels comfortably however till the callous came back and my feet got tough again. Its this simple to understand for me.

Its not about blood in this case, Its about removing protection from the foot. Thinning that protection. Perhaps NEEDED protection. You just cant do this on every foot. THAT is why we say do not thin the sole. A novice eye cannot tell when it is appropriate and when it is not appropriate. The foot WILL become what it needs to be with the right terrain and trim. I explained my idea of what forcing a foot is and this is quite forced IMO.

A good trimmmer (IMO) will not need to touch the sole after the first setup trim in most cases. Novice trimmers should not touch the sole without guidance and understanding.

Im not focused on Strasser or any other name. I know what works as I also trim a lot of feet, and here that would be way too much all at once on a frog that may not be ready. Plain and simple. Maybe its ok for your area and those horses and she can get away with it, but definatly not mine if I want to keep any clients riding in the mountains here without boots.

Edited by Trinity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hawktree, I hope you don't take dialog for dissing. Any trimming strategy, when discussed, will have folks who have many opinions. Some will agree, some disagree. Disagreement is not disrespect. I am still looking forward to hearing more about the frog as an indicator of coffin bone position in the hoof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to hear opinions about post number nine. To me, taking down the right heel (our right in the pic I'm assuming) "feels" wrong and looks wrong. So I'm curious what others think. I would be inclined to take a hair off the left heel IF I touched it at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would like to hear opinions about post number nine. To me, taking down the right heel (our right in the pic I'm assuming) "feels" wrong and looks wrong. So I'm curious what others think. I would be inclined to take a hair off the left heel IF I touched it at all.

This feels awfully familiar, looks like something from the land of hoof capsule distortions and optical illusions (delusions?) where I live with Lyra. Remember one of the landmarks pointing to a high side "the frog will point to the highest side"?

Hawktreefrogline.jpg

When I rotate the hoof from post #9 so that the course of the frog is my primary focus, it does seem that the right side of the heel could come down. Both sides seem pretty jammed up.

I have been trying to let the frog be one of my primary guides with Lyra's hoofs. I think it is very easy for home trimmers to get lost when there are angular distortions. I was trying to trim to the sole, but used the bony column for orientation regarding how I would sight down the leg.

AngularDistortion.jpg

Betting that with a toe in or toe out horse, p1, p2, and p3 will be congruent with each other and with the frog.

It seems that by using the frog as a representative guide of the p3 plane, iI will have one more tool to cut through the visual distortion.

What do people think?

I'm really happy you started this link Hawktree!

Still wondering about this quote:

Since the frog is a mirror of the coffin bone and is where it belongs - that's the medial/middle plane - that's the guide - always

Now to test this out and see what y'all think.

Here is a photo of Autumn's last trim (her second since I got her)

Autumnfrog1.jpg

Looks to me like the right side needs to come down.

Here is the same photo rotated to give me a different perspective on the course of the frog.

Autumnfrog2.jpg

Now to create a 90 degree frog/heel axis I can see that actually the left side would need to come down and that the light blue line would be closer to my guide.

Yes? No? I'm whacky? [Crazy] Definitely.

Edited by aredhorse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Red - Thanks for your words of wisdom. [Huggy] You bring so much reasoning to all conversations - and you work harder than anyone to try figure out the this puzzle.

When I look at your pictures - I see a high left heel in both pictures. The first one - look at where the lines intersect - (this trim doesn't consider the hairline so I'm not even looking at that line). See how the left side is not *square or at a 90 degree angle*? It's more like a 75 degree angle - you would need to lower that heel in order to turn it into a 90 degree angle. It took me a while to understand this so just look and let it sink in. Try drawing a line from the center sulcis line just a little lower on the left heel - see how you've made it "square" on both pictures? But I do try to take pictures looking straight down the frog.

And the quote are my words/understanding/translation - but it stands to reason - that the P1, P2 & P3 are always where they belong and the P3/coffin bone defines the frog so they are always in the right place. It's just the hoof capsule that moves. That's why this trim works - each time you balance the hoof to the frog and let it grow - the next time the hoof capsule will be more correct around the frog/P3.

And Southern - I took a better picture that shows the right side is high - I'm waiting for the hoof to grow a little before correcting it again. I had that hoof really off balance....but it's getting better. The red lines are the current balance - the blue lines show how by lowering the right heel and quarter slightly - I'll have a more balanced hoof.

100_4275EX-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First let me say that though i don't trim in a Strasser method I have found her writings very informative. Strasser's removal of so much material is geared to let the hoof relax and un-contract. Soreness and abscessing are accepted as a part of her rehabilitating process. With her back ground as a vet I can see where clients would hang on her every word and accept it as gospel. Unfortunately my clients would send me packing. But again an open mind is imperative in this movement. I am reading The Chosen Road by KC La Pierre and at first watching his trimmer at a mini clinic I was not impressed but i am enjoying the book and his thoughts on form and function. With that being said I really have to get on the bus with Trinity. This bar trimming does seem excessive. The bars are a continuation of the hoof wall and I feel help support the inner structure from bottoming out. They also are a part of and support the heel structure where initial impact (should) occur. This much bar removal and the starting of the relief for the quarters all the way toward the back of the heel removes a lot of material and support from the heel itself. This concerns me and I feel this could cause a lose of strength in the heel and maybe a total collapse . As for rasping the sole at the toe I also do it. BUT....only when collateral groove depth at the apex tells me I have room and toe length is excessive. ONLY then. For me the reading of the collateral grooves has become invaluable. When I first started this stuff I wanted to make it all complicated (it's a man thing). I felt I was trying to make myself feel oh so smart with the big words and fancy technics and when my clients looked at me as if i were speaking in Greek well their lack of understanding was their problem. One thing that clients do understand is that their horse is not sore when we are done. It amazes me how many new clients expect their horse to be sore after a trim only because they were made sore by the prior farrier. Conservative Conservative Conservative. Find the bottom of the collateral groove (you may have to dig a little on some horses)and use it. I am in agreement that the relief in the quarters could be a little less then I sometimes see applied and feel excessive relief can cause cracking in the quarters. I hope you do not take anything on my post personally I have enjoyed your thoughts and input on this board. You are an asset to the bare foot community. I'll get off the soap box now. :winking:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Saddlup - I appreciate your comments. I have also added some side views of my cadaver feet so you can get a different view of the bars/quarter/heel.

100_3680.jpg

100_3660.jpg

100_3651.jpg

The quarter relief test is the same one MC describes - a credit card should be able to slide under the quarters - but you don't want a big ol' swoop - that's an imbalance on the heels or toes. And wouldn't that add pressure to the heels/toes?

And again - these horses are not lame after the trim - this is not a Strasser trim. "Broken Record* :happy0203: You can actually order the book The Official Trimming Guidelines of the AANHCP at http://www.star-ridge.com/Page16.html.

I know that we are all trying to do what's best for our horses and I'm glad you're out there advocating for the barefoot horse! I have to say that I've had the most success with this method. I've ridden more the past couple of weeks than I have the past 18 months. My horses are finally sound again. Thank goodness we live in America :)

Edited by Hawktree

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did this trimmer address bony column alignment in her clinic?

I've seen where the sole has been rasped away in an effort to balance the hoof. I've done it myself and never had a problem. I can certainly imagine a thin soled horse in dire straights, tho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Felda - not quite sure what you mean?

We examined many, many P1-3 bones and again, this trim considers that the P1,2 & 3 are all where they belong in that horses' leg/hoof. That horses' bones don't move - it's the hoof capsule that is malleable or moves. So by balancing the hoof to where the frog is currently placed in that horses hoof - you're trimming to the P1-3 bones - right? So does she address the bony column alignment - well, I'd have to say she does.

But if you mean does she look at the leg to balance the hoof - I don't believe she does. She balances the medial plane - a line from where the apex of the frog is pointing too - at the toe - back to the central sulcis.

I saw this work for her windswept clients' horse as well as the client who horse's knee points more to the side than to the front - he's now sound. (He had been made lame by previous trimming attempts to straighten the leg.) These are just the two I physically saw - it was my first time seeing windswept legs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry, but I don't agree with this thinking.

I see the pared out sole and a sensitive horse and think yup, she still has a lot of Strasser in her.

If you want to take P1, P2 and P3 into consideration, you'd better draw lines on them too, cause there's a lot more consideration than balancing to strictly the solar plane. Turns at the joints and the way a horse uses it, just to mention a couple.

If the bones are straight, but the frog is not pointing at 12 o'clock, then its an imbalance. When you run a line from the middle of cannon thru the apex and beyond, it...to 12 o'clock, you'll immediately see the medial/lateral imbalance to cause the frog to point where it is now. That's lining the capsule up with the bones.

100_4188EX.jpg

I took the left side heel down, not the right. You're heel balance line on this hoof is incorrect. My white line over your blue is correct.

Now compare the thick black lines showing better heel balance. My black center line on the frog shows what the hoof wants.

I ran another blue line across the hoof walls and both are inside high. Note the white balance line running around the hoof. That's what the sole plane wants to be. If you look at this hoof without lines, you'll see that all I did was follow the sole...you can see the line without my line. Now look at the wall height above my sole line...left side high again.

Note the tilt on the way the frog is flying. P3's outside wing is closer to the ground. Why would I lower that right side/ heel more? Look at the shape of the heel bulbs...inside high again. Look at the slant on the capsule. Know that the inside is jamming, splatting straight down (not across to flare...sinking down on that side)...how its collapsing.....high inside again.

To think that the right side and heel of this foot are longer, to me, is to lock this horse into his pathology and worsen it/stress on joints. Stop the high side from jamming and it stops tucking that side of the frog downward and stops collapsing that heel and the frog will point to 12 o'clock. This thinking is totally backwards to mine and doesn't make sense.

Then you've got a couple of turns before the leg even gets to the band and you are not talking about medial lateral balance, though it does always come into consideration, but the frog is pointing at 10 o'clock to the leg, not the capsule, regardless of the balance on the capsule. You have to take into consideration of how the horse is using it and you must constantly coax a tiny correction that helps it. Otherwise the pathological use of the foot will be promoted and worsened and aggravated.......you must control it for what it is.

Hero's bones deviated inward at P1 and P2....twice. I could see how the first turn affected the 2nd turn and how that affected everything at the ground. The inside was high and jammed up so badly, he turned his toe in (as with all high insides) and landed and broke over the outside. (that's how strongly the high side was dictating) Since the outside is not the toe and couldn't take this, it crushed. The heel contracted inward and smashed into the inside one and the heel bulbs literally twisted together. He was starting to walk on the outside wall of his foot! Each trim, I took the inside down just a tad more than the outside. When done, the inside wouldn't even touch the ground anymore! But 24 hours later?....it was....and so it went. When he left, the deviation was still there in his bones, but his heel bulbs had untwisted and separated, heels widened, his sole was even and his breakover was right where the frog was always pointing. For all the bends in his bones going into the hoof, his hoof was now straighter, flying straighter, being used as it should be with breakover and from the front, more hoof under him and supporting his deviations. If I had taken down his outside heel, he would have been walking on the side of his foot for sure. What you are saying just doesn't make sense to me.

Autumnfrog1.jpg

the yellow line is incorrect. The bottom of the line has been swayed by past pathology on the heel bulbs. If you look at the bottom of that yellow line...that's not where the bones are....its going into outer space.

Other than a tad of height on the right side toe quarter that's not even worth mentioning, this is as fine a balance on a hoof that I've ever seen. I might put a stronger bevel on the outside of the right heel, but that's it.....just fine....do you hear me One Grey Horse?

Sorry, I'm going to go over and stand with Trinity also. It all seems so backwards, narrow sighted and badly focused on the truth of the matter. I find it frustrating and feel like the waters have been muddied. Just keep an open mind and let your future experiences guide you.

I trim the hoof to what it wants, not what is. I take the whole horse and his life into consideration and looking at the bottom of the hoof is not just lines to me. It's every nuance and many sentences in a big story. This seems very short sighted.

After seeing xrays on so many horses and the damage done from a high inside and what its done to the splat side.....the fractured wings, chips and fractures in P3 itself, thinned wings, sidebone and bone changes in the joints above it....joints literally grinding together on their low side. You couldn't pay me to splat the splat side more. Plus, going with the pathology leaves it hanging around longer with no relief that is needed immediately.

I always thought that there would be more damage from the high jammed up side, but its the low side that pays....with every step, whether they are deviated above or not. I'm going after the high side to stop all this. If I have the concavity to do so, I will disobey the sole to achieve better balance and give the horse relief and freedom from further damage to his bones for every step thereafter. If I can, I WILL NOT wait around for this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MissyClare - thank you for your thoughts on the balance of this hoof. You are right - I was wrong. And I am sorry for any harm I may have caused to anyone else. I sent the picture to my instructor and she informed me of the same thing. The frog is so skewed that it's not an accurate line for me to balance though. And the lines (via the paint.net program) were never part of the training. That's a tool that I was trying to utilize - and obviously, not very successfully. At least with a frog so skewed. Balance is the devil!

In class or in the book - they used rasps perpendicular to one another to one-eye for levelness. The other pictures of cadaver feet are all properly balanced though.

And I feel guilty for answering any questions about the instructor's technique or trim - I'm sure I've responded wrong to those as well. She is so articulate, knowledgeable and helpful - I wish you could all have a conversation with her - to make up for my lame attempts.

What I would encourage anyone trying to learn to trim - is to take a hands on class or find a trimmer to mentor from - there are so many nuances to trimming.

Sorry again - Sandy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this