jumpin_horses

Got This Email From A Friend... Crazy Update

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my 17.1H big bodied SSH fits into my 6.5 foot two horse traight load just fine with room to spare. The horses know what a roof is and they make head bumpers for this reason. That said, I think ditching the small trailer is a good idea in this case for this mare.

A slant load with all the dividers out or tied back can be used as a "stock" trailer in a pinch also. Just load the horse and let them free. They cant fight restraints that way and just ride.

You do what you got to do with what you have...

Straight loads are dangerous IMO for horses with loading problems. Plus they dont haul as nice as a slant. Ill be getting a slant again in a year or two.

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i know this isn't your horse.... but i've read all the comments, the thing that leaves me scratching my head is; is having spent a small fortune on her, REALLY worth all the headaches this mare has created? the small fortune spent on her purchase price, is barely a drop in the bucket compared to what she will cost in the long run(training, new trailers, etc. etc. the list will go on... ) with all the holes in her training and mental state.

im not saying to give up on her by any means.. not at all.. im just not one that likes to spend a boat load of money on something, no matter how well its bred, that has HUGE issues that may not ever be completely resolved. when i could have better spent my money on one without all the BS to work thru.

theres too many good horses in the world, for me to want to spend alot of time, effort, and $$ on a horse with NO regard for their own life, let alone anyone elses....

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i know this isn't your horse.... but i've read all the comments, the thing that leaves me scratching my head is; is having spent a small fortune on her, REALLY worth all the headaches this mare has created? the small fortune spent on her purchase price, is barely a drop in the bucket compared to what she will cost in the long run(training, new trailers, etc. etc. the list will go on... ) with all the holes in her training and mental state.

im not saying to give up on her by any means.. not at all.. im just not one that likes to spend a boat load of money on something, no matter how well its bred, that has HUGE issues that may not ever be completely resolved. when i could have better spent my money on one without all the BS to work thru.

theres too many good horses in the world, for me to want to spend alot of time, effort, and $$ on a horse with NO regard for their own life, let alone anyone elses....

That was my first comment and first post. She would really be smart to sell this one and get her a horse which doesn't need "experienced horseman handling". But, I'm also thinking that the opinion in her world is, that the crap is worth the hassle in exchange for a "Talented" horse. Not my opinion, though, because the crap will always get in the WAY of the talent, in the long run.

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Manes- ditto. Had the owner been experienced enough to deal with this mare herself, she would have known better than to buy her in the beginning unless the horse truely was worth that much time and effort.

No horse, no matter how much their worth, is worth putting your own life endanger when the horse themselves has no s3ense of self preservation or rational equine thought process.

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As a side note.. I work at a large draft farm, most of the horses are 17.2 to 18.3... they fit perfectly fine in a 7' high trailer with room to spare. If they whack their head, its their own fault. Although their almost always in the draft size trailer, they fit just fine in a normal horse size trailer. If they fit, so will this mare, unless she's part giraffe.

Buying a taller trailer to accomidate this mare is enabling the problems she has already by giving her some extra height as to not stress her out.. which iws more than likely the EXACT reason the mare is in this shape. Nobody made her behave, or skipped vital training steps as to not rile her up. She sounds like she needs a "come to jesus" meeting, rather than to be coddled.

I forgot, or maybe it wasn't mentioned... how does this mare stand tied?

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I forgot, or maybe it wasn't mentioned... how does this mare stand tied?

She doesn't.

And I think she was born on the property, if I remember correctly.

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That's what I was thinking... that's issue number one for me... tying teaches all sorts of very good lessons and is what I feel a vital skill.

Not tying says a lot.

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thank you for all your responses.

however, mare will not be sold ever, no matter what

she does not tie, and probably never will be able to be trusted "tied"

there are holes in her training, owner knows this. and we are learning to deal with it, but, it doesnt all come at once, its going to be a "process"

she will be accomodating mare in new trailer (her choice).. hey, its a nice trailer, I may order one myself

http://www.horsetrailerworld.com/remote/ro...l.asp?ID=236629 (you can get it in 7.6 high for like $500 more)

it is what it is.... mare needs work, mare is loved, and will be staying wether she is talented or not.. she just happens to be very talented.

even if she is only ever a "pasture ornimate" she will be kept forever.

ive known the mare since she was born she does have some very good qualities. not tieing is a small price to pay. and none of this is her fault. aside from this "tie/trailer" problem, she really is "quality" and will stay

ETA - if owner did sell (which would never happen) Id jump on this mare in a second! :happy0203: wouldnt give it a second thought

Edited by jumpin_horses

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I'm glad her owner loves her.. and can afford to do the right thing. Huge kudos for that.

I very much disagree with "not tying is a small price to pay". Tying is basic. Tying is patience, giving to pressure, accepting confinement/restraint, and self control (their only hurting themselves by acting out & nobody is making their decisions for them). All of which appear to be lacking, some more than others. If her life depended on anyone of those very basic foundation skills, the end result may not be good for her or whoever is handling her.

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I'm glad her owner loves her.. and can afford to do the right thing. Huge kudos for that.

I very much disagree with "not tying is a small price to pay". Tying is basic. Tying is patience, giving to pressure, accepting confinement/restraint, and self control (their only hurting themselves by acting out & nobody is making their decisions for them). All of which appear to be lacking, some more than others. If her life depended on anyone of those very basic foundation skills, the end result may not be good for her or whoever is handling her.

yes, you are correct. perhaps I should have said "the mare doesnt tie CURRENTLY"... she will. but, even having said that - she will never be trusted 100% tied tight.. ever. thats just the way it has to be. that doesnt negate the mares good qualities, not even close. mare is still worth her weight in gold, tying or not.

I have really high hopes with this new trainer. we are just working with mare until the swelling goes down from her injuries. it wont be easy for sure, but, owner will do what it takes to make the mare a "good citizen" the hematoma is about 3/4 down, scrapes, cuts are healing. she still has some neck soreness still, so we wait.

this topic has helped owner a lot. 1st it opened her eyes, 2nd it pointed her in a direction. she is running with it now.

Edited by jumpin_horses

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Buying a taller trailer to accomidate this mare is enabling the problems she has already by giving her some extra height as to not stress her out.. which iws more than likely the EXACT reason the mare is in this shape. Nobody made her behave, or skipped vital training steps as to not rile her up. She sounds like she needs a "come to jesus" meeting, rather than to be coddled.

This is what I was thinking when I was reading all of this. And y'know what, I've been here. Wait, I am there! I have a mare that a friend gave me, she didn't have time for her and hadn't done much other than basic handling for the 6 years she had her. She seemed calm for the most part, very observant and smart so I thought I could take her and have a nice horse in no time at all. It has been the exact opposite. The mare can be hugely unpredictable and can buck VERY hard. I have been on her a few times with no incident but other times she's flipped right out. So I finally made a decision, I can not deal with this horse, it's way too much for me and I'm just not willing to chance getting hurt. I've spent too much $$ on her already and for the amount of time/work I've put into her, we're nowhere where we should be. In my efforts to not get bucked off or hurt, I did my best not to "push" this mare's buttons but in doing that, we never really worked through the issue and I essentially coddled her. I tip toed around but in the end I was still stuck with the same issues. I don't have the money to keep a pasture ornament around so either we get her broke or she goes down the road (yes, slaughter is an option unfortunately). I don't particularly like the latter option at all and I think giving her one more, fair chance, with someone capable of dealing with the situation, is what she deserves before the horse faces the "pedigree pal" talk.

I'm just not the person to get this horse broke and I've come to realize that, she needs someone that's going to have a full on "come to jesus" meeting with her and do whatever needs to be done to turn her into a productive member of society. And that's exactly the type of trainer we've found for her.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that as much as I like the horse and think she's got great potential, I am not willing to spend endless $$ on her nor am I willing to get hurt. I'm going to do what needs to be done, even if the methods used aren't entirely to my tastes. A little bit of "cowboying" is a whole lot better than facing euthanasia or the meat wagon. That's a last resort, after you've tried everything. Your friend needs to set her feelings aside, step back from the situation and say "am I doing everything I can/could?". From what you've said thus far, she is trying but I think there's more than can be done.

Oh I hit submit before I saw your reply!

this topic has helped owner a lot. 1st it opened her eyes, 2nd it pointed her in a direction. she is running with it now.

Right on, I'm glad it's helped! I'm pretty sure everybody wants to see both the owner and horse succeed but more imporantly see the owner stay safe. [smiley Wavey] I hope the new trainer can help out a lot, sometimes an outside perspective and some different methods can be all that's needed. Good luck!

Edited by Cheadle Chick

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I will only wish and hope things work out well with this mare and her owner...

Edited by Ann Wheeler

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I've dealt with a lot of outside horses that had HUGE tying issues. Unfortunatly it's an all to common problem because people think that letting "Dobbin" stand tied is cruel & unusual punishment.

Like Spotted said if you have a large solid tree, with an overhanging branch & tie them correctly to it, THEY CAN NOT HURT THEMSELVES!!! They do not have the leverage to sit back, pull their neck down, throw themselves on the ground, etc. I had a 22 year old mare who was a good kids horse, but wouldn't tie either. I would tie her up in the morning to the tree, ride colts all day, then untie her at night. She would try and have a come-apart but it just didn't work cause she didn't have leverage to do anything. This was a mare who had been breaking halters, posts, throwing herself on the ground, etc. for years. I know this works, I've done it on dozens of horses and it would be the best thing for this mare, but the owner is only gonna do what she is comfortable with, sooooo... Don't discount the "cowboy" ways, those cowboys had to make nasty horses descent citizens so they could do their job.

The other thing I have to add is that I'm glad she is getting a stock trailer. It's to bad she couldn't keep her nice 2-horse for "going to town" and just pick up an old steel stock trailer for a couple grand. I have an '89 xtra tall/wide Logan stock trailer and I love it! I paid $3000 for it and it's the best money I've ever spent. It's solid steel and I've had horses try and tear it apart and it barely shows it. It also has just a narrow window running the length of the trailer on each side with bars that you can tie to that won't ever break. It ain't the prettiest, but it's solid & SAFE. I don't even plan on getting rid of it when I get my LQ next year.

Anywho, best of luck to your friend. I know what it's like to pour your heart & hopes into a horse that let's you down. I have a mare that I got from my Dad who's that way. Not behaviorally but health issues. I've cried, had everyone tell me to sell her, etc. and I just can't do it cause she is something that came from my father who is very special to me.

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