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equicrzy

Really, How Long Do You Keep A Horse Tied To The Post?

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Yes Equi, tie her and leave her tied to learn patience. If she paws, paces, sits back etc.... ignore it. After she has stood quietly for 20 minutes you can put her up. Then extend the stand quite time to 40 minutes. Then 60. Standing tied for long periods of time will prepare her for real life. We often get to shows at 7 AM and don't leave until after 5 PM, only 2-3 hours in the saddle. The horse has to know how to stand quietly at the trailer and they have to know how to stand quietly when they get left at the trailer without buddies.

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Nope, just giving my point of view on why our horse needs to stand still. If it means having them stand tied for hours until they get idea so be it does not hurt them a bit. Sure makes for a better riding and camping partner.

David

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Thanks, spottedT, I was actually coming to that conclusion on my own, it's good to hear it does work.

Dave.....I was simply wondering why some people were saying tying has no training purposes and wanted to hear the reasoning behind their opinions.

I do plan on tying my filly.

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I consider it a HUGE training tool. I consider it a waste of my time and the horse's to train on one that is not 'settled' and receptive. A 'reactive' horse that is not receptive is a completely different animal to train. I have done the same thing with Arabians and Thoroughbreds. They may take longer, but they can be settled and learn to stand tied, rest a hind leg and wait for your next directive just like any other horse.

QUOTE

From Broo

But as a training tool? I don't think being tied up for long periods really teaches much. They either know how to stand tied quietly or they don't. If the latter, teach them. If the former, what is the GOAL in leaving them for several hours?

Why not? It just keeps reinforcing that they have nothing to gain by stomping and fussing when the other horses leave. They learn to accept anything and everything where others have a 'come-apart' at being left behind or left alone when they are in rehab for an injury. Horses that have never been left for long times tied will often self destruct when they are injured. Some could have been saved if standing still for long periods of time was an acceptable thing to them.

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Those are pretty much my thoughts, too, Cheri. Since my filly will be on "stall" rest for the next month, I thought she might as well learn something in the process.

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Standing tied is a HUGE training tool! Best patience teacher in the world is a good tree. It can stand there all day and never tire out.

As usual, I 100% agree with Cheri.

Standing tied calmly saved a few horses lives. One of them got hit by a car, lost 30 percent of his muscle in his haunch with a HUGE deep laceration stitched up and had to stand in a standing stall not allowed to lay down for 4 or 6 weeks so the stitches stayed put (cant remember exactly how long it was but it was weeks) He did as he was asked with no sedatives.

If he didnt know how to stand tied calmly and patiently for extended periods of time, He likely would have had to be put down. But stand he did and he is alive today, You almost cant tell he was hit unless you look just right.

ETA he was also 100% sound the last time I saw him and still being ridden years later.

Edited by Trinity

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I guess my point is...once they know how and do it well, why keep calling it "Training"?

Most folks I know who consistently put TRAINED horses on a tie line and call it training are actually just really lazy or under staffed.

Once they get the concept, it's no longer training IMHO and is flat out boring as heck and I sure wouldn't want to do it.

As far as training goes...there has to be a reward. You stand nicely? You get untied. NOT you stand nicely=you get to stand for 4 more hours. Makes no sense and serves no purpose in my mind.

NOTE: My horse ground ties, lines, hobbles....she's fine with it. I'm not averse to tying. I just don't see it as training after X point.

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It IS training, it is reinforcing of the training they already have.

If you take a horse who ties well for hours and never again tie them for very long, when you DO need to tie them they will not be used to it and start fussing after their normal short period is up.

Horses are not hurt by standing in one spot for a time. We had straight stalls, 18 of them. All the horses in those stalls stood tied for as long as they were in there. They had hay in their mangers but when the hay ran out over night, guess what they did? Stood there tied til we got there. Then they got hayed and stood there again til they were taken out to get saddled. Then, guess what they did? Went back to their stalls and stood there tied til they were needed in the string. Not one of them was hurt by that and all of them could be dismounted and tied to whatever for however long and would stand there. Some of these horses we had for 15 or more years and that's how they lived when in the barn.

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My town has Amish in it about 800.

They tie theirs up for the whole day to fences, poles or where ever they find, while they build or work, up to 9 hours in all kinds of weather. Some they leave the saddles on, some they unhitch from wagons, some they leave hitched to the wagons.

I think they might take them water, but I have never seen them. I know they don't eat the whole time.

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Yep, I am both lazy and under staffed. [ROTFL]

When I have more than one to work, the rest get to stand tied to the trailer or to the outside of the RP while I am working one. It is great for youngsters, the one in the pen as well as the ones on the outside. The one in the pen gets to learn that he needs to watch ME and the ones on the outside learn patience and get some spook proofing at the same time.

We camp and trailride a lot and it is a major aggrevation to have a horse tied to the LQ that will not be still or that paws. If they paw when tied then they get hobbled too, talk about teaching patience.

I agree with those that said that if this horse is in good physical form and does not appear to be abused, just being tied for long periods is not harmful. Contrary to popular belief, horses do not need water in front of them constantly, nor do they have to have water every few hours even in 100 degree heat. Our horses are pastured 24/7, no shelter, 1200 acres with only two water sources. They only go to water 2 or 3 times per day at the most. If they are working, that is different as far as water goes but just standing? No problem.

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It IS training, it is reinforcing of the training they already have.

If you take a horse who ties well for hours and never again tie them for very long, when you DO need to tie them they will not be used to it and start fussing after their normal short period is up.

Horses are not hurt by standing in one spot for a time. We had straight stalls, 18 of them. All the horses in those stalls stood tied for as long as they were in there. They had hay in their mangers but when the hay ran out over night, guess what they did? Stood there tied til we got there. Then they got hayed and stood there again til they were taken out to get saddled. Then, guess what they did? Went back to their stalls and stood there tied til they were needed in the string. Not one of them was hurt by that and all of them could be dismounted and tied to whatever for however long and would stand there. Some of these horses we had for 15 or more years and that's how they lived when in the barn.

I'm just curious where turn-out fit into that day? Standing tied and being patient is GREAT in a horse. But they, like every other creature on the planet, need their down time. Time to be a horse. I know you were making a point, so maybe you just left out the turn-out time for that reason. Please tell me these horses didn't only get to move when ridden?

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Broo, I was not talking about an already trained horse, one that already knows to stand quietly while tied, but one that doesn't, such as the guy down the road tying the horse my post was originally about, a horse that is young and in training.

I wanted to know, how long is too long, is there such a thing AS too long and does standing tied for hours work well to teach patience.

From what I'm reading, it does! Thanks everyone.

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Ditto to cheri.

If a horse will not stand tied patiently for a couple hours, there's a big hole in their training (or lack there of). Patience and a calm mind are the first thing a horse sh9ould learn. There are zero excuses for a horse that cannot stand tied quietly. ZERO.

If the horse has been fed and waqtered, I have no problems leaving a horse stand tied for as long as it takes for them to descide standing tied QUIETLY is rewarded by being turned out. One of my own geldings spent just over a week tied to my patience wall. Super active minded horse who couldn't deal with there not being anythingh for him to do, look at, or play with. He ate, drank, and slept tied up. The only time he wasn't tied was wheen he was being worked. It did worlds of good for his mental state. He was an extreme case, but id do it again to anyhorse that needed it.

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Equi. My gelding spent 9 days tied until he descided it was easiest to just behave. Id do it again in a heartbeat. He's the type that thrived on mental stimulation, and would make work for himself just for some5thing to do. Ill go dig up the utube videos, he was an extreme case.

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Actually, there are many trained and older horses that benefit from standing tied. I have an 18 year old trail gelding -- broke to death and as 'bomb-proof as one gets -- that is going to get a couple of tie-out days as soon as I can get to him. He has gotten really herd-bound to a couple of other geldings in the trail string. He has become cranky and anxious if he does not follow or stay directly in front of one other gelding. They graze side by side any time I see them in the field.

It is not unusual for two older trained horses to 'bond' and then they resent separation or interference. They get cranky when a horse other than their friend is close or they try to keep other horses away from their friend. When horses get like this, they just need some time being tied up until they are 'settled' again and have things back in the right perspective. I just don't think it ever hurts them to stand tied for several hours.

Also, when I was a kid, most stabled horses were stabled in 5 foot wide tie stalls. They had a hay manger in front of them and grain box in one corner of it. Most barns had a loft and hay was dropped down to them through holes in the floor of the loft. If a horse got any grain, they got a scoop of whole corn in the morning. They did not have water buckets. There was a water trough down at one end of the row of stalls and each horse was let out, one at a time, to walk down to water 2 times a day to get a drink -- in the morning after being fed and in the evening just before the help went home. I helped out at a barn like that every summer when I was a kid. They has over 100 tie stalls. There were 3 or 4 stallions boarded there and they were handled the same way. I don't recall ever having a sick horse.

This one hundred stall barn and another 50 or 60 rental horses lived on 5 acres on the east edge of Denver in a little 1 square mile community named Glendale. The faded painted letters on the front of the huge 2 story barn said "LIVERY STABLE". You could still rent a team and wagon from them. Glendale was also the home of a second stable with fancy loose boxes, as they were called. These horses, mostly jumpers and gaited horses, had box stalls with tail boards all around them and sawdust for bedding. We thought they must be the elite of the horse world.

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I'm not for or against tying a horse to a fence/pole for a few hours, I used to have a quarter horse geldign who had a reall bad habit of setting back aswell as bolting when a car would pass on the road.

One of the cowboys around here was helping me with him and he ended up tying him up to the fence for a couple hours 5+ it did help him wonders.

So I have my reasons for it being okay but i know some people take it too far as in keepign thehorse out there 12+ hours with no water. Atleast have a bucket on hand and let the horse drink if it needs to. Would be awful if they overheated :/

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I'm just curious where turn-out fit into that day? Standing tied and being patient is GREAT in a horse. But they, like every other creature on the planet, need their down time. Time to be a horse. I know you were making a point, so maybe you just left out the turn-out time for that reason. Please tell me these horses didn't only get to move when ridden?

Our Riding Stable was just outside of Greater Boston, in summer, 36-38 horses were rotated every two weeks with 36-38 that were turned out in an apple orchard. In winter, most of them were turned out and they were rotated when weather allowed us to drive up and rotate them.

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Broo, I was not talking about an already trained horse, one that already knows to stand quietly while tied, but one that doesn't, such as the guy down the road tying the horse my post was originally about, a horse that is young and in training.

I wanted to know, how long is too long, is there such a thing AS too long and does standing tied for hours work well to teach patience.

From what I'm reading, it does! Thanks everyone.

Yes, for young ones it teaches patience. It's also good for those herd bound/buddy sour horses too.

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My opinion is as long is much like Texas law. As long as needed things (water food) are offered twice a day I think it's just fine. Along as it's with a safe tie.

I thought that in Texas, free-choice water is required. Although, admittedly my education as to that fact is an SPCA agent's comment on Animal Cops Houston, and I may even have mis-heard this.

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My knot-head stud colt was all goofy yesterday because I walked the mares by him. When I went to catch him for some nice free grass turnout he acted like a complete and utter jerk. So he stood at the hitching rail. Well.. He danced and pawed and whinneyed and pawed and danced and danced... for about 4 hours before he quit.

He is going to do it again tonight.

And when he stand quietly as soon as I tie him up... he's going to do it a few more times just to make sure it's good and sunk in.

I don't think any amount of time is too long to stand tied as long as their needs are met.

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c

And when he stand quietly as soon as I tie him up... he's going to do it a few more times just to make sure it's good and sunk in.

I don't think any amount of time is too long to stand tied as long as their needs are met.

Ditto. I have one back in "buddy sour stand tied patiently" bootcamp as I type..

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You all will love this.

Here in Maryland horses in general are pretty useless, as are those with the knowledge of how to handle them effectively. My boarding farm is right next to a main road that is a bit elevated and looks down into the "common" area. A few years ago I installed some tie rings of my own on a few good posts and have taught many horses to tie well. Recently during a rather heated exchange over our conflicting opinions of horsemanship, the barn owner announced that horses are not to be "tied" up. "People driving by see a tied horse and call it into the SPCA as abuse." You can laugh all you want but there are people like this in the world and unfortunetly, my BO is one of them too. Now I have to take horses off the property for patience lessons or try and "hide". This same BO doesn't mind at all letting horses be loose in the common tacking area. That's fun when you come in there unsuspecting and secure a horse for tacking to then find a loose horse with a lousey disposition anyway from such ludicrous handling coming over and going after the tied one. Ironically I never tie a horse when I'm working them. I expect them to stand still while I groom them or tack up simply ground tied and that is one of the first things I teach. But when I am done a lesson I like to tie them up for what I consider "soaking" time.

So be thankful those of you with your own property or are surrounded by sensible horsefolk who understand how the horse's mind works. Oh and if you are ever trail riding in Maryland and come upon a horse tied up in the woods just leave him be. I'm not far away I promise.

William (historyrider)

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historyrider- ohh wow.. i cant even imagine that.. id go nuts.. i strongly feel that having a horse that ties and stands quietly is one of the single most beneficial training tools available to a horse. there are alot of fruits and nuts in teh world, i jsut cant believe some people... wow...

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We got a complaint that our horses weren't being fed or watered, and they had no grass to eat. Well, they are on a dry lot. So no grass. But, Low and behold, they came out, we have a large metal trough full of fresh clean water, and a round bale feeder with only a few days worth or eating off it, as our boys were partially on pasture at the time.

The stickler, was that they couldn't be seen from the road. They were around the far side of a loafing shed.

So we moved the feeder and trough within view of the road. Viola. No more complaints. We live about 20 minutes from the Minneapolis/ St Paul area, and the city folk have taken to using our little quiet road as a cut through to their new suburban subtracts that are springing up all over the place.

~stars

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I do Civil War reenacting. They are tied to a picket line for days. Most reenactments go from Thursday night through Sunday. They are only off the line for drill and battles.

I would be screwed if Skip didn't tie for hours upon hours. I have begun saddling him and tying him while I work the other horse so he gets back in the habit.

I will be starting the MFT on his patience this week.

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I can imagine Coops. Good tying skills and training begins at HOME, not the first time you show up at an event. From this boarding farm we can ride North along the river to a really nice restaurant that has tie outs in back for horses. Now this is quite a luxury in the Metro Baltimore area being able to ride anywhere without crossing a single road, seeing a car or even a house. At a leisurely walk it takes an hour and a half to make it one way so it is a long ride for most people. Well a few years back, and the last time they tried, the BO's and family came along. When we arrived most of us tied our reasonably tired horses up and simply went inside. The family just stood around in the back yard holding their horses, letting them graze on the lawn. We hung out for almost an hour and I didn't feel bad for them one bit. This was the last time they ever tried to actually go anywhere.

You get out of your horses what you put into them.

William (historyrider)

Btw Coops, Do you happen to know a Grizzly old Sergent who rides for the Union nick named Doug Relic? His name is Mark Bailey but I hear he got that moniker hung on him years ago when someone saw him in character and asked, "Where did you all dig up that old relic?" Anyway, that is one of his camp horses I'm riding in my Avatar picture and I was astride a Maclellan (sp?) saddle for the first time.

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I can't imagine a horse being tied up for days without being able to lie down.

We tie to high lines for days when we go trail riding and ours lay down at night all the time. We actually use cattle collars and snap the high line ropes to those. Our horses sleep flat out on their sides though.

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History... I probably know him by sight.

I have been playing messenger the last few years. Since I grew up with the infantry and love my Dad's unit. (Been reenacting for 20 years.) I stuck with Vincents brigade. Mainly the 30th PA Co E, the 20th Maine, and 2nds US. We are a motley lot.

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