Kasi

Getting Her Shod

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My filly has just turned 3. Well after going through 3 different farriers, this farrier who is very reputable and knowledgeable he informed me that he hoof soles or walls(cant remember exactly what he said right now-time for bed) are very weak and he suggested shoeing her. I have never had a horse shod before so Im all new to this. She has had a problem with abcesses and lameness since I got her and he attributes that to the weak hooves. His price is $90 for the whole set, is that a good price? I want a good job done so Im not going cheap, just wondering. What do I expect when she gets this done? Do they go lame from it or do they not react? She had a problem with stalking up in one leg after he did her trim last time(like I said new farrier that is trimming her the right way). She was working much better from that. He was bringing her back up under her self, the past farriers had left it kind of long all the way around every time. Everyone (at the barn I board at) swears by this farrier so I am trusting his judgement. Do you think this will help the abcesses and lameness? We have nothing to attribute the lameness to except the weak hooves-she had a leg laceration but it didnt get to the tendons or muscles so we arent sure of any other reason. He said if she walks on hard surfaces or rocks she will have problems, which she is on off and on in the barn and when we trail ride/road ride. Im sorry that there are a lot of questions in this but again like I said I am new to a horse that has to be shod! EEK! My horses have always been barefoot but this one will be her own horse haha and require fancy shoes ( Im seeing a quirk that she shares with her owner!!! HAHA) Thanks for any and all input!

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There is no way we can give you an educated answer untill you post pictures of your horses feet. Please see the sticky above and get the shots of CLEAN feet on a hard surface. Make sure to set the camera to the "flower" setting so it focuses on the foot and not things past the foot. Make sure to set the camera on the ground about 14 inches from the foot you are taking a picture of.

You can start with the fronts and get the backs later but pictures are a must.

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I'd be interested in seeing pictures of her hooves. Most abcesses are from a faulty trim. I wouldn't shoe such a young horse, personally. Her hooves are still trying to grow to their adult size and shoes will hinder that.

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there is probably a reason she has crappy feet right now... (crappy trims, diet, environment, etc.)

NOTE: [smiley Wavey] shoeing her at this time is only a way to mask her true, underlying problems. they will probably NOT "fix" her feet.

sounds like she may need some rehab for a few months (to a year depending on her problem), then decide if you want to shoe (or not) once she has healthy feet. Im guessing not, cause "heathy feet" are a true marvel, and can crush rock like steel.

need to post pics (and her diet) to try to see her underlying problems

Edited by jumpin_horses

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Thanks everybody, I will try to get some shots taken of her hooves. They are overgrown right now because she is due for a trim, but I will see what I can do. Thanks!

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I am just wonderin what puttin shoes on a horse with weak hoof walls is suppose to fix? I mean shoes do not encourage healthy thick hoof wall but rather do the exact opposite. So I'm baffled at that part. And what would shoes do for thin sole? It's not gonna fix the problem. I don't know, I just think its all kinda silly when I hear farriers tell people that sorta stuff.

And Hibiscus IME and IMO abscesses are not mostly due to bad trims. Especially if we are not talkin about abscesses on the sole. But even then I would say abscess blow out on the sole are not due to bad trims 85-90% of the time.

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BHBJ- Just going by what I've seen in person and what I've read on here. You don't find many horses with amazing trims that get abcesses IMO.

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Abcesses are generally caused by two things...A weakness in the hoof that alllows something foreign in or a bruise. Both of which are greatly amplified by poor trimming, solar carving or bad shoing.

Horses with a great trim and foot can still abcess in t the right circumstance, but I believe the frequency is much less than a horse recieving average to sub-par hoof care.

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there are SO many things that *can* cause abscessing

some horses are more susceptable to some of these things than others.

definately bad trimming/shoeing is on the top of the list.

there is also, sugary/high carb diet, spring grass too rich, injury, over work on unfamilar surface, or when not conditioned, vaccines, illnesses, medications, fever, etc. EVERYTHING a horse does, eats, injests, his environment, his condition, his work, goes DIRECTLY to his feet.

mostly, anything that affects the lamina/corium can cause abscessing, among other things

the hoof is like a trunk of a tree. every line tells a story

its funny, ive actually caught clients in lies (and called them on it) just by looking at the hoof.. he he.. you should see the looks on their faces when they get caught... LOL

it usually goes something like this:

Client: "NO, I have not been giving him treats"

ME: "yes, you have"

Client: "no, I havent"

ME: "yes, you have, here let me show you where the foot is telling on you"

Client: " :ashamed0002: well, maybe just a few"

ME: "if you love him, you will stop giving him treats" [Crazy]

Edited by jumpin_horses

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All good advice here. $90 is far too much for something that is only going to bandaid the problem and not fix it. This statement for shoes, plus the fact that the hoof is overgrown makes me wonder about things, especially with a horse this young. Young horses really amaze me at the powerhouse of ability they have to bounce right back with hoof health. It already sounds like she's lost some important time for development that will carry her for the rest of her life. With shoes, she'll continue to lose. The trim, the diet, the movement/protection etc. are all changes you must be willing to make. If in place, I would venture to predict healthy hooves well inside of a year....shoes long forgotten or needed. [bat Eyelashes]

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Everybody's right. You need to figure out why this horse has such crappy feet and what can be helped to correct them so the horse doesn't have to live in shoes forever.

The benefit to shoeing this horse now would be to get her soles off the ground and to keep them from bearing all the weight of the horse. The sole is not meant to carry this burden by itself, but more in conjuction with the other structures of the foot. Team effort, right? The negative to this is if the horse has crappy walls and such too, the shoes stand a good chance of getting ripped off and doing more damage to an already weak hoof. If the problem really stems from the sole, your horse may get immediete relief from whatever is bothering it. Caution tho, horse can still step on stones or other sharp objects and injure the sole with shoes on. If it's a leverage/tendon/angle problem, you're SOL unless Mr.Farrier does a balanced job or works to correct the issue. Remember, it's the trim under the shoe that makes the difference.

All said, $90 might be good for your area. Here, $90 is too low for a good farrier to work for. That's for 4 steel shoes, nothing special. All the good farriers that work here in my area charge about $120-$150 for their work.

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