laceyjane

Turning Fat To Muscles

Recommended Posts

I had a post "Weight Control For My Mare" on Horse Health Form.

I have been working on some of there suggestions, but I was wondering if I could find some advice here.

I have a 16 year old, Standardbred mare.

30704_1499487093894_1435670367_31352897_7133479_n.jpg

She is out on the pasture in the morning and the evening, and in her paddock in the afternoon and at night with a flake of hay(Timothy Hay). She gets one quarter of a lb of Fat and Fiber just as a treat. I am in the process on trying to get Min-A-Vite Lite, to add to her diet instead of Fat and Fiber.

As suggested on my other post, I am working her 5 days a week, approximately 45 mins. At a walk and trot.

Any other suggestions for taking some weight off and putting some muscle in its place.

Edited by Lacey and Shutgun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

meekie Thanks. She means the world to me. And in the past 6 years we have gone miles together. I wish I lived closer to you all because it would be fun to hit a group trail ride, and to get a chance to work cattle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The heat of the day causes sugar to build up in the grass. There is less sugar in the grass in the morning than in the evening. I would eliminate the evening pasture time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sort of in the same boat as you,since I don't canter at the speeds to really build muscle,The trainer works her butt harder for me everyday, I do turn-out lunging on sat and sunday(her ride'n days off. but during the weeks she gets @1hour and a 1/2 part of that is cantering and the extended trot/ round pen work before ride/n, When I got her she had no muscles at all,its take'n lots of protean,and sweat to build it. but at least know she can do things, Just the walk/trot stuff was not enough...might be all you need too [Question]

Edited by GlowingTrickPony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To turn fat to muscle: Same as what I'm trying (in vain) to do to get rid of my cookie bag: More Exercise, Less Food

With horses, trotting is an excellent way to build up muscle. Alternate with fast walking.

Also, going up and down hills at a walk is another great way to get a horse in shape.

Long trail rides (building up to four hours +) are another way to increase stamina, especially if there are hills and trotting involved.

She looks slick and healthy, but just like judging a dog's condition, you should be able to feel her ribs, and it's okay to even see ribs as long as the shoulders, back and hips are rounded.

Refer to the Equine body condition chart to determine obesity in horses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't turn fat into muscle. You have to reduce your fat and build your muscle. You reduce fat by changing your diet. You build muscle by adding exercise. I'm sure it's true for horses as well as people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can't turn fat into muscle. You have to reduce your fat and build your muscle. You reduce fat by changing your diet. You build muscle by adding exercise. I'm sure it's true for horses as well as people.

Well I just see it as it is easy to muscle her up when she has a little fat on her, then when she is underweight. I am trying to figure out what diet is right for her but it is hard when I have always been trying to get weight on her and this year something happen and she is holding weight with next to nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To turn fat to muscle: Same as what I'm trying (in vain) to do to get rid of my cookie bag: More Exercise, Less Food

With horses, trotting is an excellent way to build up muscle. Alternate with fast walking.

Also, going up and down hills at a walk is another great way to get a horse in shape.

Long trail rides (building up to four hours +) are another way to increase stamina, especially if there are hills and trotting involved.

She looks slick and healthy, but just like judging a dog's condition, you should be able to feel her ribs, and it's okay to even see ribs as long as the shoulders, back and hips are rounded.

Refer to the Equine body condition chart to determine obesity in horses.

My dad is a cow person. And I am have a hard time convince him that something need to change. I have convince my uncle though. She is not badly over weight but have a some gutter along her back. Very shallow. She has a layer of fat on her rids. You can feel them but it is not easy to feel them or count them among the fat.

I started out taking her on long walking with light trotting trail ride once a week, but she was sore for a couple days. So as mentioned on my other post, I cut back to 45 min to and hour 5 days a week.

So should I continue with this then slowly increase the time but change it to every other day?[\b]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The heat of the day causes sugar to build up in the grass. There is less sugar in the grass in the morning than in the evening. I would eliminate the evening pasture time.

If I did this would it have to be permanent, or until I got her weight under control.

I have own her 6 years and have have her on pasture 24/7 or in the day and in the barn at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I started out taking her on long walking with light trotting trail ride once a week, but she was sore for a couple days. So as mentioned on my other post, I cut back to 45 min to and hour 5 days a week.

So should I continue with this then slowly increase the time but change it to every other day?[\b]

How did you know she was sore? Where was she sore? Feet? Back? Legs? This needs to be addressed before continuing with conditioning. If her feet are sore, she may need to be shod or booted. If her back is sore, the saddle might not fit her. If her legs are sore, she may have a lameness issue--look for heat or swelling.

Riding a little bit every day is a good way to build up strength, then lengthen the time out riding gradually. You may want to alternate long rides with days off and/or shorter rides.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How did you know she was sore? Where was she sore? Feet? Back? Legs? This needs to be addressed before continuing with conditioning. If her feet are sore, she may need to be shod or booted. If her back is sore, the saddle might not fit her. If her legs are sore, she may have a lameness issue--look for heat or swelling.

She got shod after I noticed the wear and tear her hoofs where getting. She is just stiff all over. I think it was just that she was not in shape. Because I notice more energy every time I take her out now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now