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Feline Vaccination Questions... Cvm?

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Found 3 kittens dumped in a drainage ditch outside of in-law's house. Person that dumped them (very odd ex-neighbor) said that there were 12 total, but they were dumped (spread out) along a major highway. Absolutely sickening. In-law's have been feeding kittens (adult food... meow mix- yuck BID) and were talking about how it's time the kittens leave because the porch is beginning to smell like feces (from under the porch). Hubby and I have decided to take two. A male and a female. I am estimating age to be approx. 12 weeks old, as kittens were VERY active, running, playing, etc when they were found 6 weeks ago. Kittens weigh 4lbs.

My question is what would be a good vaccination schedule for these kittens? Due to a very busy vet's schedule they will not be able to be seen for a couple of weeks, I would like to prepare. Distemper, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Feline Calicivirus, Rabies, and Feline Leukemia are the standard kitten vaccines, correct? Feline Leukemia test first? I haven't had a cat in years, so I'm a bit rusty. How much are the vaccines usually estimated to cost? Am I getting into $100 each like a horse? Like, I said.... rusty, haha. Just want to do the right thing by these kittens. They will be going on proper kitten food. Switching gradually to avoid GI upset. Any tips to ease their transition from living outside to inside or do most cats take the adjustment with flying colors. I would like the kittens to be completely indoor in the end, to minimize risks. Also, is there anything I should be worried about contracting from the kittens?

Thank you tremendously!

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What you have listed sounds pretty good. Start with leukemia test, first RCPC/Lekemia, boostered in 3 weeks, Rabies with last booster. Spay or neuter any time after that.

As far as what you could catch, roundworms & ringworm would probably be the most common, both of which can be avoided with routine hygiene.

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My cat is a stray barn/house cat that wandered up the driveway about 6 years ago and promptly had one kitten that did not survive. I took her in to get her vaccs and spayed, promptly. I told them to do the feline luekemia test first and if it was negative to go ahead and spay her and give her Distemper, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Feline Calicivirus, Rabies, and Feline Leukemia vaccinations and worming. If it came up positive they were to euthanize. It came up negative, they spayed and vaccinated and I picked my little stray up almost $300 poorer.

Since then she has gone once a year to get Distemper, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Feline Calicivirus, Rabies, and Feline Leukemia as well as a worming. When I asked for a fecal the vet that she would just worm her with a broad spectrum wormer as she is an outside cat (although she is in at night) and even if she did not have any worms it would not hurt her. It is one pill, they just stuff it down her throat right there in the office and send us on our way.

P.S. not sure of the type of wormer, maybe CVM has an idea of what it is.

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If you do all the Vaccine's you likely are looking at near what you spend on a horse. Neutering is almost always cheaper than spaying, so if you have the option, males are going to cost you less.

I spent about $400 (may have been more, I stopped adding it up) when all was said and done on spaying and shots for my Bump kitty last year. :thud: It made those adoption fees at the pound seem much more reasonable than I had previously thought. I can't remember how much was shots and how much was spaying. If I had it to do again, I would use one of our low cost spay/neuter clinics. I know they don't do quite as much to be sure they come through safely (fluids and such), but we've probably had 30 cats done that way over the years in the past and all have done fine.

ETA: Some of the extra cost is because they have to go back in multiple times for boosters and such and you pay a visit charge every time (or at least I did). Not sure if there is much way to avoid that part.

Edited by ExtraHannah

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I work at a vet office, so here's what I know from my experience.

At this vet, we do two core vaccines, rabies ($12) and FVRCP (upper respiratory etc., $16). A third vx many opt for is FeLV (feline leukemia, $21). I'm not sure what particular things need to be protected against in your area, but of course, your vet staff will know. The rabies is good for one year, and the other two should be boostered in 4 weeks. In CA, vaccines aren't required for your cat, if they are indoor cats most aren't necessary anyway.

At our vet you can have a blood test triple done that tests for feline aids, feline leukemia and heartworm ($55). That is usually a good first step, because if they have any of these infectious/fatal diseases, you may not want to sink any more money into them.

At 4 lbs I imagine they are closer to 3.5 - 4 months old. We usually spay/neuter at 4 months. Feline spay is $95, and neuter is $60.

They very likely have worms (almost every kitten/puppy is born with them). We use Panacur (fenbendazole), which is priced by your kitten's weight.

We also use a Rx product called Revolution that kills heartworm, mites, some intestinal parasites and fleas. It's super expensive though, about $30 for a one month dose.

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Thanks so much for the replies! I really appreciate the information. Haha, it really does make the adoption fees look small, but every kitten deserves a chance. :)

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If I had it to do again, I would use one of our low cost spay/neuter clinics. I know they don't do quite as much to be sure they come through safely (fluids and such), but we've probably had 30 cats done that way over the years in the past and all have done fine.

Yeah, don't EVER be afraid to use a well-reputed low-cost spay/neuter clinic, especially for a surgery so simple as a cat neuter. I volunteer at one in Columbus as a member of the OSU Pre-Veterinary Medical Association and it's a wonderful place. They pump out LOTS of surgeries every day, with one to three doctors depending on the volume. But don't assume that the care is substandard just because the price is low. At the clinic where I work, the animals are monitored from the second they come off the table until they are extubated and able to hold their heads up on their own, which is when they're put back in their cages. As soon as the animals hit the recovery mat they have their temperature taken. If they are too cold they are wrapped in blankets and heat packs are warmed in the microwave and put around them. If they are too warm, the cause is investigated. Their ears are cleaned, their nails are trimmed, incision sites cleaned, and cats of all ages and puppies are "sugar lipped"-we smear Karo syrup on their gums and lips so that their blood sugar doesn't drop. Then we stay with them, petting them and encouraging them to wake up, until they have the blink reflex and will swallow when you tug on their tongue. They are then gently extubated and continue to be monitored until they can hold their own head up, which in the case of vomiting, prevents aspiration.

This clinic can afford to keep their prices low and still provide this standard of care because of all the people who volunteer their time to the clinic. As a volunteer, recovery as outlined above is my main duty, and when surgeries are done I clean cages, make surgery packs, or whatever else needs to be done. They also recieve generous donations and sometimes have "guest" veterinarians come in and volunteer their services. I had my boxer's rather complicated chryptorchid surgery done there, and we've had all of our cats and another one of our dogs fixed at a low-cost clinic. They are really a wonderful resource that you shouldn't hesitate to use if you have a reputable one nearby. P.S. the one I work at also offers lower-cost vaccinations as well as microchipping, heartworm testing, etc.

/end plug for low-cost clinics

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