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whitneyhoku

3y Old Needs To Be Broke Cont.

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I want to thank everyone that helped me before, whether it be with harsh words or tips and tricks.

I just got back in from tacking Comanche up. He took the bridle just as easily as anything (Which makes me think he had only been ridden bareback, but whatever), and the saddle pad just fine. No sidestepping this time!! I lifted the saddle up, back down, let it sit in the rail for him to sniff, wiggled it so it made noise, then lifted it again and put it on his back. He did react, and started walking fast circles around me, but I stayed with him and got him to stop.

I didn't cinch it up till about 15 minutes of it being on his back. I wiggled it on his back, picked the stirrups up and dropped them, and led him around before cinching him up. Yeah, bfore he was cinched, he reacted. But every reaction was the same; walking fast around me. He never once reared, kicked, or even raised his head past a normal level! I have to thank you guys so much.

When I cinched him up, I led him around some more, but of course didn't dare get up on him. I may be clueless about training, but I'm not stupid. He did fine, I guess used to it by then, and didn't jump or anything. Alittle side stepping when I first tightened it, but he got over that quickly.

But what do I do now besides keep this up? What is the next thing?

On a side note;;

I also got him to give me all four hooves without problem. I set them down before he had an idea of doing it, then picked them up again. All I had to do was touch his leg and he lifted them. I swear, someone did something with him, cause he is a changed horse. Also, he lunges abit better. Didn't go faster then a fast walk, but he pretty much kept the circle up. Again, thank you guys.

Edited by Hoku

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It sounds like YOU walked in with a new sense of purpose and determination, mind-set if you will and he read you like a book. And cooperated, at least as much as his pea-brain would allow! [ROTFL]

If it were me, I would do this at least 2-3 days in a row, then put some driving lines on him and ground drive him. Get that "Whoa" down good ... make sure he knows "whoa" means stop NOW. Not take even one more step. Also, by using the driving lines, he gets used to you giving "commands" when you are not right next to him. He needs to know those commands coming from you are meant to be listened to, whether you are on his back, on the ground, at his head, behind him, whatever.

Good job! Just remember to *always* end on a good note, even if it takes 3 hours to get to that point.

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I wouldn't have known a thing of what to do without HC.

He doesn't know what Woah mena sunless I have some way of touching him.

If he is just walking around, he won't stop untill the leadrope is moved. But he listened fine with the bridle on. Stopped at the slightest tug, turned without problem. I think he will be a good horse, so long as I get him started off right..

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Okay. Let's keep this easy. When he's walking around you, that's a problem. Who's controlling the feet? It's not you is it? Focus on his hind quarters and disengage his hips so that he is facing you with two eyes. Maybe it would be better if I suggested that you focus so hard on his butt that you smacked it with a lead rope or tool so that he not only moved it, but backed up a few feet to try and evaluate why you just BIT him on the ***. Don't worry about whoa until you get control of his rear end. You won't need rein nor lead rope if you can control his hips. This work and the idea will come with you to the saddle so once again, groundwork will save you trouble later.

Get this horse's respect and have control on the ground and find fun ways of testing it before you ever thing about getting on his back.

William (historyrider)

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As a note, when you DO get to the driving phase, make sure you get him used to long lines, or ropes over his back and around his hind legs, first.

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Awesome !!

As Andi said.........repetition. Doing something ONCE - does not mean he is trained at it........build each day in little increments. Expect a tiny bit more perfection each day at whatever you are asking. Set the bar high - don't settle for a "well he SORTA did it"

We all look forward to the day when you are finally riding that fella.

Be safe.

CR

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I did the same thing today, and he did marvelous!

Except today I moved the saddle more, and had an extra leadrope through the stirrup so I could keep him walking in a circle around me, and move the stirrup up, down, side to side and what not. It took about 45 seconds, then he just walked and stopped when I asked and didn't care that either stirrups where moving. I got pictures! He looks fancy in his green bridle, lol.

Ad to make things even better, he dind't even sidestep or anything when I put the blanket and saddle on. He did when I tightned the cinch after putting it on and off about 6 times, but then he stopped and let me finish cinching him up. Iknow I'm going to do something wrong, but for now, I am pleased. He backed up when told to, stopped (But had to ave some reinforcement with the leadrope and halter) and did a few great circles of lunging. ANd he stood perfectly still when I untacked him.

Comanche_tackd_up_1_by_Howrse_Rox.jpg

Comanche_tacked_up_2_by_Howrse_Rox.jpg

More later. I even got a video of him waking around. I won't be able to get out there till the weekend, but I will work every weekend with him. It may not get him done as fast as he needs, but he will e able to be ridden come next summer. I don't know about working him in the winter, but I will see wha I can do. Tips?

I know I sound stupid towards the end, but I was so excited. xD Edited by Hoku

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Okay. A couple things I'm noticing with your tack fit.

1. Your halter is too large. See how it sits so low on his nose? It's less effective that way. It's merely hanging off his head. You need to either poke more holes in it (a hot nail works great on nylon) or purchase a smaller halter.

2. You need at LEAST an inch of pad showing from out the front of your saddle.

3. Take those reins off. Unless you are teaching him to give to bit pressure on the sides with the reins, they don't need to be on. It's an accident waiting to happen if he does decide to freak out randomly.

4. Your cinch appears to large for him as well, but you can always get a smaller one later when it comes time to ride. Its difficult to say though as i'm not there physically to see it.

5. Change your bit. You need a snaffle or something much lighter on his mouth

You sound like you're doing really well. I would continue to lunge him at a walk, trot, whoa for now. Don't bore him to death with unnecissary repetions. Moving the saddle around is fine for the first tacking...perhaps even into the second, but don't drag it out. Walk up to the horse expecting him to be on his best behavior. Do NOT walk up to the horse timidly with the saddle and setting it all softly on his back once he's used to it. You need to make these experiences seem like "no big deal" or he's going to be more afraid of it, moving around, etc. If he moves without you asking him, MAKE him more his feet. Make it difficult. Always make the right thing easy and the wrong thing HARD. If he backs up from you without you asking that, make him back fast and hard for about 10 steps. Then stop and act as if nothing happened. Drop eye contact and lead him forward again. Pet him and continue.

YOU must be in control at all times. It's GOOD that you are getting him familiar with the feels and sounds of the saddle. Just don't stay on one routine for long. Change it up. So keep lunging him and eventually move up to ground driving him. He looks VERY young just by seeing his face shots and front shots. So i would definately wait to put any weight on him. Good luck with him and keep up the good work!

ETA: By weight I mean by adding your weight to his back. He definately could use some more filling out and growing up. Appears to be a late bloomer. If you are a relatively light rider (please take no offense as I mean none!) light pressure would be okay on the stirrups or small rides. But we'll cross that bridge once the time comes.

Edited by spanish_walkin_wannabe

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What kind of bit do you have on him...I recommend breaking him in a snaffle, an O-ring or eggbutt or somethign similiar...you want him to have a light mouth, so you want to start in a light bit. Also, looking at your saddle, do you have the back strap and the girth on the same hole? I can't tell what that strap is going behind the stirrup is from the pictures?

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Hoku, glad to hear that you are doing well so far. May I make a couple of suggestions? :happy0203:

First, since Comanche is just starting out, switch him to different bit. I'd prefer to see him working in a very mild O-ring snaffle of some sort. I'm personally a fan of french links... like this one: 5243_s.jpg

Next, go ahead and just remove the reins for now. Re-attach when you are ready to start ground driving or using them in some manner, but for now, they are just going to get in his way and cause a potential accident. Consider how it would go if he stumbled just a bit while his reins were looped over the horn and he tried to use his head to balance, he'd get one heck of a nasty yank to his mouth, which would be best avoided. As it stands, it doesn't look like he can really relax his head and neck, and right now, him being relaxed and comfortable is one of your goals.

Keep in mind that for a young horse that is still learning, multiple shorter sessions are best. I know that you have some limitations due to location and availability, but PLEASE be careful not to try to stuff a weeks worth of training in to your 2 weekend days. Their little brains can get fried with too much at a time. You need to be prepared to stop your session if he does something particularly wonderful after only 15 minutes.

Perhaps one day a week (Wed?) you could arrange to have the bus drop you off where he is and work with him for a bit before a parent could pick you up and take you home? That could make a big difference.

If you truly are limited to the weekends only, find a way to spread out training sessions. Show up, spend 30 minutes really working with him.... then spend an hour or so cleaning up the barn, riding a different horse, grooming.... then spend another 45 minutes working with him. Try to break up your sessions into smaller increments with a brain break for him in between.

Good luck, and keep safe!

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Horse crazy, that strap appears to be the left over hanging from the original cinch strap. I'm not sure if her saddle is tied up with a western knot or what. The saddle also appears to have no keeper for that left over strap.

Just a side note: Typically with a nylon strap you would use the holes vs. a knot as the knot in nylon can slip and become lose. I'm not sure what you are using or if that strap is even secured and done up.

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ok i see what you mean, at first i though she had a back strap along with the girth on the front of the saddle.

Also, I do this everytime I ride, but after you tighten the saddle a bit see if he will let you grab his front legs and stretch them out, it helps somewhat to make sure none of the skin is pinched in the girth ( I dont know if it actually works, but my horse seems to like it).

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.........yes - for sure get rid of that bit..........way too much for a horse you're just starting. AND - it almost looks like it could be a Tom Thumb.........ey-yay-yay !

http://www.todayshorse.com/Articles/TroublewithTomThumb.htm

You would be better off working the horse in a halter to start or a snaffle as mentioned above.........

* * * * *

You may want to have a look at your cinch strap - is there equal length on the other side? It could also stand to be moved back from the front leg more so it's not pinching the skin with the leg movement.

Reins - you can certainly tie them to the horn or whatever - but they need to be waaaay longer so the horse can drop it's head and not feel like it's being held back when being asked to walk out.........

:)

Edited by Cactus Rose

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It's not a tom thumb, just a grazing bit and not a bad bit with a more finished horse. A tom thumb has straight shanks.

However, I agree that you need to start him in a snaffle bit. A snaffle bit has no shanks (long cheek pieces).

Why? Shanks = whoa and very little turn. To teach a green horse to turn, you need a snaffle without shanks. There is enough bite in this first bit that you won't need the shank for stopping.

Very likely someone at your barn has a snaffle they would let you borrow that is just sitting around. If not, you can pick one up pretty cheap at a local tack/feed store to get you started. A D-ring or egg butt snaffle are easier for the really green horses because the bit won't pull through their mouth if they are pulling on your hands.

D Ring $23.00

Egg Butt $26

Also agree on the no reins needed at this point as they are just confusing. Keep reins around that have snaps so that you can easily attach and remove them while working with your horse.

Good luck!

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What everyone else said but want to add something ...

Remove the halter when you put the headstall and bit on. I've found it can "hang up" on the halter and often give conflicting signals.

And the reason everyone is saying to remove the bit and use a snaffle is the bit you are using DOES look like a Tom Thumb, or at least a variation. Anything with shanks (where you attach the reins) is NOT for a horse that doesn't neck rein or move off leg or seat cues. A simple O-Ring or NO bit and just a halter with reins attached is best. The reason being when you pull on a rein with a shanked bit on the horse, you give conflicting signals. Shanked bits aren't meant for direct reining, or "plow" reining, which is what you want to do with the horse for the first year or so. Some people never go on to any other bit than a snaffle, if they don't show.

But don't worry about the progression right now. Just remove that shanked bit and get a nice O-Ring snaffle.

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Sorry about the bit.

Thats the only western bridle that fits him.

I will see if Mrs S's has a snaffle. I'm sure she does.

I only left the halter on cause once i got the bridle on him, I couldn't get it off.

I will figure that out too.

The saddle wasn't cinched all the way up.

But it does fit.

Uhm.. Anything else I did wrong?

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Since he takes the bridle easily. Undo the halter and just keep the crown piece (the top) reattached around his neck so he can't go/move off anywhere. Once the bridle is on, THEN remove the halter from around his neck and viola! Halter is off! [Huggy] Whenever you are working a horse, with a saddle on, it should always, always, always be cinched and secured properly. Use the holes on that type of strap as well. The nylon, with a western knot, will slip and become loose. Keep trying. You are doing very well.

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Also, if you do not find a snaffle bit, PM me your address, and I will send you one of mine. I have about 9731286761 million of them.

LMBO

Have you ever figured that out Spanish?

I mean why we ALLLLL - as horse owners - have to have more than one of EVERYTHING?

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CR. LOL. I have no idea why I have so much of everything. I have 2 full sized horses and a mini. I have like...12 pairs of bell boots. IDK why. I have tons of some things and few of others. I always figure..."well just incase!!!!" Well....just incase has me a huge freakin mass of stuff i rarely use that has flooded my tiny tack shed. lol. I should be on an episode of Hoarders: Buried alive (Equine Edition!)

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Also, if you do not find a snaffle bit, PM me your address, and I will send you one of mine. I have about 9731286761 million of them. LOL.

And this is what makes HC such a cool place.

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Actually, I like your saddle for starting colts. Better quality than a lot of people come here with. And it looks like it doesn't fit him poorly either.

And if Spanish is passing out snaffles, I want one or two. (I've come to the conclusion one can never have too many snaffles.) I'll trade you some sort of horrific barrel bit if you want one! :)

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Thanks again to Spanish for the bit.

Once I get that, I will start again. This weekend I won't be down there working with him. My Gma just got out of the hospital, so I will be spending it with her. She had heart surgery or something along those lines. Not to mention I just started school. I will try, however, to be down there anytime during the week Mrs S says I can, and what not. Please excuse me and my lame excuses.. xD

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well? me I see a kid that can use ALL our Baby hand-me-downs! [ROTFL] same comments as the others,but I did notice that it looks like your saddle is too far back? that cinch should be more in line w/ the strait angle. and make sure you can put a fist in under that pad (under the horn)and saddle after its cinched up too. and the pads a little small...you need more up front. but otherwise!!good luck!!I've(we all have) been in your place too! a zillions years ago but you at least have the benefit of us! and all our collective years! so good luck!!

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Glowing, actually, I think that saddle is too far forward, looking at the shoulders of the horse.

It could come back just a tiny bit, and the back strand of that cinch should be about even with the front edge of the stirrup in the second picture. As it is now, the cinch is too far into the "armpit" of the horse.

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