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Peggy Sue

"common" Vet Classes

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Semester 1 (Fall)

ANS 511

Animal Science for Veterinarians

2 (2-0)

PDI 515

Comparative Veterinary Gross Anatomy

6 (2-10)

PDI 516

Veterinary Histology & Cell Biology

4 (3-2)

MMG 561

Veterinary Immunology

2 (2-0)

SCS 511

Veterinary Radiology

1 (1-0)

V M 511

Veterinary Perspectives (VP) I

2 (1-2)

V M 512

VIPS I*

1 (1-0)

18 (12-14)

Semester 2 (Spring)

ANS 513

Animal Nutrition for Veterinarians

2 (2-0)

PDI 517

Veterinary Neuroanatomy

1 (1-0)

MMG 567

Veterinary Microbiology and Infectious

5 (4-3)

Diseases I

PSL 511

Veterinary Physiology

5 (5-0)

PDI 551

General Pathology

3 (2-2)

V M 521

Veterinary Perspectives (VP) II

2 (2-0)

V M 522

VIPS II*

Semester 3 (Fall)

MMG 569

Veterinary Microbiology and Infectious

5 (4-3)

Diseases II

PHM 556

Veterinary Pharmacology

5 (5-0)

PDI 553

Clinical and Systemic Pathology

5 (4-2)

V M 532

VIPS III*

3 (1-4)

V M 533

Veterinary Epidemiology

3 (3-0)

Semester 5 (Fall)

V M 552

VIPS V*

3 (2-3)

V M 553

Theriogenology and Urinary Diseases

5 (4-2)

V M 554

Hematological, Oncological and

3 (3-0)

Dermatological Diseases

V M 555

Neurological and Ophthalmological

3 (3-0)

Diseases

V M 556

Digestive, Metabolic and

5 (5-0)

Endocrinological Diseases

V M 557

Operative Surgery

2 (1-3)

21 (18-8)

* VIPS -Veterinary Integrative Problem Solving

?Capstone course for the semester.

?Integrates material taught for that semester.

?Non-lecture format.

?Problem-solving focus.

?Designed to utilize communication skills.

21 (17-9)

Semester 4 (Spring)

PHM 557

Veterinary Toxicology

2 (2-0)

V M 541

Veterinary Perspectives (VP) III

2 (2-0)

V M 542

VIPS IV*

3 (2-3)

V M 543

Cardiovascular Diseases

2 (2-0)

V M 544

Veterinary Public Health

2 (2-0)

V M 545

Principles of Anesthesia and Surgery

4 (3-2)

V M 546

Musculoskeletal Diseases

5 (5-0)

V M 547

Respiratory Diseases

so unless the individual is interested in large animal or nutrition very little pertaining to them which is why it is so important to ask them how much "XXX" studies have you done and have you kept CURRENT on your learning...

my copy and paste put these out of order for some reason SORRY

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Not sure what the intent is with the post, but all of those courses cover all species. With the VIPS course listed, it looks like a Michigan State schedule. Keeping in mind that those are the first 4 didactic semesters when you're sitting in a classroom and rarely if ever touch an animal. The remaining 2 years (and those are FULL years, no summers off) are all clinical rotations with a set number of required courses as well as elective courses.

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Dina just a conversation I had with somebody IRL had me posting it... her vet has NO Equine skills at all in fact he is scared of horses they all have to be sedated to have thier annual shots!!!

I dont' even remember what vet school I pulled up

the point is that most classes are "general" and unless you aim towards equine it is just part of the general studies ya all take

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Dina just a conversation I had with somebody IRL had me posting it... her vet has NO Equine skills at all in fact he is scared of horses they all have to be sedated to have thier annual shots!!!

I dont' even remember what vet school I pulled up

the point is that most classes are "general" and unless you aim towards equine it is just part of the general studies ya all take

Perhaps so. But even if it is so it's perfectly general, perfectly true, and perfectly meaningless.

You've just proved that no DVM who graduates from this particular curriculum has any particular expertise in equines or bovines or ovines or porcines or canines or felines or anything else. You've also proved that they have a very significant education in general veterinary subjects, certainly more than the Mark 1 Mod 0 horse owner (or owner of any other animal). This comes as no surprise to me and gives me no special insight into anything.

I still don't get the point (beyond, maybe, some general attempt to discredit DVMs).

G.

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No the point is to not be afraid to question thier "findings" if I hadn't questioned my vet on our old Morgan mare she would be dead right now of colic since the vet had no clue what was causing it ...

same with my bay mare ... her treatment for her was hoof supplement and her hubby trimming her like walking horse with stacks

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Know your vets and where they did all their learning and what they spent that extra time CVM talks about on know where thier interest lie.

More general knowledge doesn't mean the same as more knowledge heard the term jack of all trades master of none.

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Its the same as any medical professional....the base education is the same, but there is always a specialization process. You wouldn't go to a cardiologist for an opinion on your rotator cuff tear. The clinical rotations during the last 2 years of vet school is where that personal specialization occurs. Likewise, there's a big difference between book smarts & street smarts. The smartest individuals are often times those with the worst stall-side manner.

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Its the same as any medical professional....the base education is the same, but there is always a specialization process. You wouldn't go to a cardiologist for an opinion on your rotator cuff tear. The clinical rotations during the last 2 years of vet school is where that personal specialization occurs. Likewise, there's a big difference between book smarts & street smarts. The smartest individuals are often times those with the worst stall-side manner.

That's what I was getting at ...

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what goes on in my head doesn't always come out right in type LMAO ... brain to finger disfunction

I am noticing this forum tends to take the BAD from stuff instead of the good ... very negative here alot of the time

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Well, as ambiguous as the OP was. I think I can respond with an argument that slightly reflects the point. You quoted the first 2 years of one school's curriculum. Which school? Not stated. I'm no expert on veterinary school, although, I am a junior in undergraduate school as a biology/pre-vet major.

The following information is about the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

From VMCAS, the official application service for vet schools across the nation:

VMCAS, UC Davis page

CURRICULUM: The curriculum is designed for flexibility. The core curriculum is discipline-based and provides a broad foundation of knowledge and skills in comparative veterinary medicine. The elective curriculum provides students with an opportunity to explore diverse veterinary-related interests and tailor their learning toward career goals . Electives increase throughout the curriculum with the majority taken in the third year. The fourth-year provides students the opportunity to focus on areas of interest in a clinical setting.

Here is a publicly available curriculum (from 2009-2010) for UC Davis Vet School.

I will not copy and paste it all here, as there are literally hundreds of available classes. Some are CORE classes, meaning every student must take them during the year (be it, first year, second, etc.). Others, are ELECTIVE classes. These classes can be chosen by the student to fulfill their particular career goal (large, small, equine, food animal).

First year CORE classes have subjects like: doctoring, cardiovascular physiology, physiological chemistry, behavior, epidemiology, clinical skills, cell biology, radiology, nutrition and ethics. Not very specific, but I'd hardly like to meet a veterinarian that did not have a PROFOUND understanding of these foundations.

While ELECTIVE classes during that first year (I'll just choose the equine-related ones) are: large animal radiology, and equine neonatology.

During the second year, more ELECTIVE classes are available: equine locomotor anatomy, in addition the previously mentioned ones.

It isn't really until the third year that students can choose many ELECTIVE classes: equine theriogenology, large animal anesthesiology, equine surgery, advanced equine medicine, equine critical care, equine ultrasonography, and equine lameness and radiology.

During the fourth year, though, the student can choose their clinical rotations. There are enough to choose from that I will just post the link to the equine track.

Keep in mind that this is just one school's curriculum. There are about 35 vet schools in the US, each with varying teaching methods.

Also, this is just the four years of veterinary school. While not required, many students (especially those who wish to specialize), with spend a year or more as an intern in various clinics and hospitals across the country. For example, one could intern at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, , notably one of the largest and most advanced hospitals in the world.

All this training is really irrelevant though, if you don't choose a veterinarian with specific and in-depth knowledge AND EXPERIENCE with the species you own. A student who chooses to pursue a career in small animal medicine will still learn a great deal about large animals, food animals, and exotics. They may, however, have almost ZERO experience handling these animals in a practical setting. I don't know about you, but it takes most people years and years of working with horses to truly develop the skills and experience necessary to properly handle and care for them. One won't learn that in 4 years of vet school unless they devote themselves to it entirely.

If you don't think your vet is qualified to treat your horses, I suggest you choose a different one.

(edited to correct the bold)

Edited by mistymorning

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what goes on in my head doesn't always come out right in type LMAO ... brain to finger disfunction

I am noticing this forum tends to take the BAD from stuff instead of the good ... very negative here alot of the time

When you fire a "broadside" you can't hardly complain if you get a lot of smoke and water splashes along with a hit or two. Or a shot or two back!!!!! :winking:

If your point is that sometimes owners can know more about a situation than a vet then you're right. If your point is to encourage asking of questions then you're right. But this was wildly unclear in the first post and, as you noted, sometimes people do stuff in these waters just to be "negative." How did anybody know what you meant? The duty to be clear rests with the poster; the readers have no duty to be "clairvoyant" in figuring out what somebody means.

The ink on a DVM diploma, or license, does not change based upon the electives the person has taken. Since that person has the right to treat a wide variety of animals then the schools who educate them have a duty to provide that wide variety of education. Electives in one species or another is not a Bad Thing, but how much of a Good Thing it is might be open to question.

A professional license carries a great responsibility with it; it should also signify a wide range of knowledge.

G.

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All this training is really irrelevant though, if you don't choose a veterinarian with specific and in-depth knowledge AND EXPERIENCE with the species you own. A student who chooses to pursue a career in small animal medicine will still learn a great deal about large animals, food animals, and exotics. They may, however, have almost ZERO experience handling these animals in a practical setting. I don't know about you, but it takes most people years and years of working with horses to truly develop the skills and experience necessary to properly handle and care for them. One won't learn that in 4 years of vet school unless they devote themselves to it entirely.

If you don't think your vet is qualified to treat your horses, I suggest you choose a different one.

(edited to correct the bold)

Thank you Misty

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