Sign in to follow this  
mehpenn

Cnn Poll Of The Day..

  

42 members have voted

  1. 1. Should Bible Classes Be Offered In Public School?

    • Yes.
      12
    • No.
      25
    • With parental approval.
      8


Recommended Posts

My daughter's school has a "class" taught once a year that instructs on the theory of evolution... but does not offer any classes concerning creation based on the Bible.

My daughter will not attend the evolution class... she will be kept from school that day, as it's something that is given to the entire class as part of their science lesson...., with no regard to the individual child's belief or their parent's point of view.

The school did send home a letter informing parents that it is a subject they will be discussing and what day.

I do think it's unfair to offer information on creation based on evolution and not the other way around....

I found it interesting that CNN offered this as their poll of the day....

Edited by mehpenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm. I am esentially a creationsist, but I would never keep my children home from school if evolution was to be taught. It is a part of scientific theory, which will always be a part of life in education. Having them not exposed to it, in my opinion doesn't "protect" them from the theory, it just doesn't allow them to form an educated opinion on how the rest of the world views things.

I do agree that creationism ought to receive equal teaching time, but my guess is that since it is a faith-based theory, not a science-based one, there's really no place for it in schools that do all they can to keep any mention of G-o-d out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter's school has a "class" taught once a year that instructs on the theory of evolution... but does not offer any classes concerning creation based on the Bible.

My daughter will not attend the evolution class... she will be kept from school that day, as it's something that is given to the entire class as part of their science lesson...., with no regard to the individual child's belief or their parent's point of view.

My brain is exploding right now.

I hope your daughter never studies biology in college, because she'll be seriously behind on the basics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evolution belongs in science classes. I respect your opinion, but I do not feel that creationism should be taught in a science class, because, well, there's no science to support it. It's a faith based belief, not something that belongs in s scientific field of study.

I don't know why so many people feel you have to believe in one or the other, there are ways I think to accept evolution, and also be a religious person.

I do think we're doing our kids a disservice when it comes to science education, because in some places we're so afraid of offending the creationists that we are not covering key principles in science. This is going to hurt us as a nation, our youth will continue to fall behind in the world.

I really agree with most of what this author has to say.

In defense of science

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evolution belongs in science classes. I respect your opinion, but I do not feel that creationism should be taught in a science class, because, well, there's no science to support it. It's a faith based belief, not something that belongs in s scientific field of study.

I don't know why so many people feel you have to believe in one or the other, there are ways I think to accept evolution, and also be a religious person.

I do think we're doing our kids a disservice when it comes to science education, because in some places we're so afraid of offending the creationists that we are not covering key principles in science. This is going to hurt us as a nation, our youth will continue to fall behind in the world.

I really agree with most of what this author has to say.

In defense of science

Brilliant!!!!!!! :notworthy::notworthy::notworthy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not okay, in my opinion, to offer one and not the other.... My family does not believe in the theory of evolution, and therefore we don't feel it's valid for our daughter to be a part of that class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But that's like saying our family doesn't believe in the theory of gravity, or in our family, 2+2=5, so we're not going to send our kids to math class. Where does it end?

Evolution is a SCIENTIFIC principle. There are experiments, fossil records, etc. to support the "theory". That's how science works, that's the entire basis for the field. You have a problem, then look for solutions to the problem that can be tested and tried by research. Over time, research results and failed hypothesis give us an idea of how things work. If you can't back it up with numbers and experiments, it's not really science, and shouldn't be taught as such.

So, using the example given from the link,

Now, many will say that they are not anti-science per se, just against the science that clashes with their religious beliefs. So, antibiotics are fine, but the theory of evolution is not. If only they'd take the time to learn about how antibiotics work and about how over-prescribing can result in germ mutations that render some antibiotics ineffective. It's is a real-time illustration of the theory of evolution at work.

So, if you don't believe in evolution, how do you propose a subject like antibiotic resistance be taught in a science course? How would you teach her about this instead?

This is a big problem in our health industry, and we need critical thinkers out there who can research and work towards a solution. If you do not teach evolution, then how can one believe in antibiotic resistance? Where will our next generation of scientists come from to work on these problems if we deny them the opportunity to learn basic scientific fundamentals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will you keep your daughter from other classes that contain topics in which you don't believe? I don't believe in abortion, let's say, but they teach it in constitution classes. Same for gay/lesbian rights.

I don't believe in war, yet you can't get thru a history class without it slapping you in the face.

Children face EVERY SINGLE DAY a host of things that technically should be against either their beliefs or their religion, but if their faith and beliefs are strong, and their parents are doing a good job at home, they learn how to decide what's true for them.

I used to love going into evolutionary discussion in school. I was a faithful kid who even at a young age loved to discuss stuff. Being exposed to those discussion never once cause me to waver in my beliefs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose it would depend on the definition of "Bible class". I would not have a problem with my child studying parts of the Bible as part of a literature course or a history course which discussed different world religions. I would not have a problem with parts of the Koran being used in the same context. But I would have a BIG problem with her being taught the Bible as the literal truth in a public school.

Like it or not, believe it or not, evolution is a fact. The creation story in the Bible is a myth just like similar creation stories in other religions. It is an explanation of the origin of the world by a primitive people with no scientific knowledge. There may be a "higher force" that began the process. That is up to your personal beliefs. But the world wasn't created as described in Genesis. There's just too much scientific evidence to the contrary. You can believe the world is flat if you want to but that doesn't make it so. Personally, I think it's sad that your school even gives a child the option not to attend when evolution is taught.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The key difference is that evolution is science, backed by loads of evidence (I highly recommend the books "your inner fish" and "why evolution is true" - they are actually very readable and very interesting), and creation is a belief.

Saying one doesn't "believe" in evolution is like saying one doesn't believe the sky is blue.

I'm all for teaching about religion in schools in some cases (I did an excellent mythology segment in english class that included stories and literature from Greek myth on through the Bible and Native American belief systems... and in social studies, learning about religions is essential to learning about the history of an area). Directly teaching religion, on the other hand, is promoting it, which is un-Constitutional and not the school's job.

I've also read enough Creationist websites, and watched enough videos, to know that most of the "supporting evidence" for it is horrible, horrible science that is very easily debunked. If the only support for something is an ancient book (that was rewritten, and translated, and retranslated, and rewritten, then edited for political reasons, and retranslated again), then it's not science and doesn't belong in a science class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a problem with OFFERING Bible classes in public schools. I guess the problem there arises that as soon as you offer one, each and every religion would want their own class including an atheist class. And then you get to where you started, where it's just better to be taught outside public schools.

I would not keep my child from attending either the evolution class or the bible class based only on my beliefs, since the child needs to be informed to make their own choices and form their own beliefs. How would a child benefit from being shown only one side of the story?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evolution is NOT a "theory" it's a fact and it has been proven, things/people do and have evolved. Creationism, on the other hand. cannot be proven...where is the proof?

You are sheltering your daughter, she needs to hear all sides and come to her own conclusions. My kids were exposed to all sorts of different things growing up, I didn't keep them from learning about things just because I might not believe it, they are individuals with the ability to come to their own conclusions, make their own decisions.

If your daughter believes the same as you, there is no harm in her learning about evolution.

just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it'd be great if they offered a general "world religions" type of class, and made it more like a history class than "bible study" . The history and ins and outs of each religion are very interesting, and I think it'd be great for children to learn about them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have children so I may be speaking out of turn here but if I did have children, I would hope I would be the type of parent that would encourge them to seek knowledge and learn as much as they can about all things so that they become as well rounded as possible. There is a lot of truth in the saying "knowledge is power."

Plants are shaped by cultivation and men by education. .. We are born weak, we need strength; we are born totally unprovided, we need aid; we are born stupid, we need judgment. Everything we do not have at our birth and which we need when we are grown is given us by education.

(Jean Jacques Rousseau)

The educated differ from the uneducated as much as the living from the dead. (Aristotle)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may ought to read this book, that explains why people believe what they believe:

"Born to Believe", God, Science and the Origin of Ordinary and Extraordinary Beliefs, by A. Newberg, MD and M. Waldman.

Then you may understand what science and faith are, why they are what they are and why you should not mix both as you are doing there, to the detriment of your daughter's education.

Yes, that is a book very religious people of faith accept as a good way to solve the dilemma you have there, separating what you believe and what science is and isn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People who will not listen to a theory or belief that doesn't agree with their own are afraid that their own belief will be changed.

If person's faith in their own belief is strong enough, listening to, learning about, or letting their children learn about another belief should not threaten them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've grown to believe in the power of decision making, not persuasion, force, or god forbid (joke) dogma.

to the OP, your daughter may be too young to decide for herself, i have no idea, but i don't think any child is too young to process information for use later on. should she not learn about other religions and religious based cultures either?

what is it that you would want her to hear this one theoretical day in school that she doesn't hear day in, day out, at home about the bible's theories, should it be also offered according to your wishes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not have kids either.. so I'm not speaking from experience.

But on the issue on a whole. I don't understand why people can't believe in evolution AND creationism. Can it not be believed that God created the world and set into place the seeds of evolution? Or God put all the gases and matter etc in place to create the big bang theory etc and everything came because of that?

I don't sit and wonder the specifics really, but I believe in both. I believe that life, whether it be human, animal, algae, single celled organisms, etc, is too magnificent to just be "by chance." Someone or something, which I choose to call God, helped things out. And look what became of that creation? He even set it in place that the cells and organisms evolved into greater things. Evolution.

It's hard to say this or that should be taught in schools because so many people believe so many different things. And the school systems are so bogged down, and underfunded how can we keep adding all the choices people would want? I like the science books that mention both. I like teachers who talk about both. I like choices and all the information to create my own opinion about things. Experiencing something is so much more gratifying and believable than just hearing or reading about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evolution belongs in science classes. I respect your opinion, but I do not feel that creationism should be taught in a science class, because, well, there's no science to support it. It's a faith based belief, not something that belongs in s scientific field of study.

I don't know why so many people feel you have to believe in one or the other, there are ways I think to accept evolution, and also be a religious person.

I do think we're doing our kids a disservice when it comes to science education, because in some places we're so afraid of offending the creationists that we are not covering key principles in science. This is going to hurt us as a nation, our youth will continue to fall behind in the world.

I really agree with most of what this author has to say.

In defense of science

This. :notworthy:

It makes me very sad to think that there are still people out there that would keep their children from learning about something that science has proven to be FACT. There is absolutely NOTHING wrong with learning both. I will be forever grateful to my parents, who allowed me to attend church as a child when I wished and allowed me to learn science as well. That turned me into the well-rounded person that I am today. It makes me sad to think that you a sheltering your daughter from learning things simply because you don't believe them to be true. What happened to creating well-rounded children who are prepared for the world? One day of lecture isn't going to harm anything.

I don't think there is any place for creationism in PUBLIC schools. You can't prove it scientifically, like evolution, or gravity, or any other scientific law. I have nothing against people who believe in God or follow any type of religion. People can choose to believe what they want to believe, and that is fine with me. However, you can't teach beliefs to children. Children need to be taught facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evolution belongs in science classes. I respect your opinion, but I do not feel that creationism should be taught in a science class, because, well, there's no science to support it. It's a faith based belief, not something that belongs in s scientific field of study.

I don't know why so many people feel you have to believe in one or the other, there are ways I think to accept evolution, and also be a religious person.

I do think we're doing our kids a disservice when it comes to science education, because in some places we're so afraid of offending the creationists that we are not covering key principles in science. This is going to hurt us as a nation, our youth will continue to fall behind in the world.

I really agree with most of what this author has to say.

In defense of science

Well worded! Evolution is a fundamental aspect of science and will only keep reoccurring in your child's education. I wish more people would educate themselves in evolution, I believe there are aspects that people of all religions can agree on.

-Zoologist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to go a little deeper here.

I believe in choice. As an example, said my parents were Catholic and I went to Parochial schools. As I grow and get older and more independent, I may choose to expand my religious or spiritual journey and explore other ideas. I may become a Muslim, or a Buddhist or Lutheran or Pentecostal. A child can be taught *only* the parents religion and when it's an adult, finds out there are lots of other thoughts and ideas out there that "speak" to them ... may harbor some resentment towards the parent for not allowing the child to grow into his/her own person.

I think in grade school, basic science should be taught. More advanced science in middle school and then in high school, have 1 required credit in more advanced science, and have several choices such as biology, chemistry, etc.

If the school is large enough to support the extra curriculum, I think having several of the major religions taught as electives. By "major", I mean Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Muslim, etc. Not "taught" as in "believe in this", but rather "taught" in the sense of studying it to learn it's effects on societies and cultures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This yr cheys school MAY take the 5th graders on a feild trip. They will take them to cincinattis creation musuem. Those ppl put alot of work into making this place a really neat place. It not only shows how animals evolved but what they evolved from.

Yes it does show them how things were created, and i was told that if the parents didn't want the kids to learn about god and other things, then the kids would be taken to a different area. BUT isn't it good for the kids to learn everything they can right now.

I know that i would not pull chey from school IF what was the OP said was gonig on. I know its their right, but it will or could bring something else on that the parent could get introuble for.

Here in ohio, if you pull your child out of school for no good reason then the parents becomes responible. There was a parent here in chey school, that pulled her child out the three days they were talking about ealth issues, How the young girl starts certain thing, young boys learned about their things. The second day they taught a little bit about sex ed, then the third day the nurse brought each girl into her office and gave them a big bag of stuff.

The parent got in trouble with the school for not sending her daughter there. If you keep your child out of school because of things you DON"T belive in, it may come back to bit you in the butt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huge Ditto to everything here. They said exactly what I was thinking.

Hmm. I am esentially a creationsist, but I would never keep my children home from school if evolution was to be taught. It is a part of scientific theory, which will always be a part of life in education. Having them not exposed to it, in my opinion doesn't "protect" them from the theory, it just doesn't allow them to form an educated opinion on how the rest of the world views things.

I don't know why so many people feel you have to believe in one or the other, there are ways I think to accept evolution, and also be a religious person.

Children face EVERY SINGLE DAY a host of things that technically should be against either their beliefs or their religion, but if their faith and beliefs are strong, and their parents are doing a good job at home, they learn how to decide what's true for them.

I suppose it would depend on the definition of "Bible class". I would not have a problem with my child studying parts of the Bible as part of a literature course or a history course which discussed different world religions. I would not have a problem with parts of the Koran being used in the same context. But I would have a BIG problem with her being taught the Bible as the literal truth in a public school.

I don't have a problem with OFFERING Bible classes in public schools. I guess the problem there arises that as soon as you offer one, each and every religion would want their own class including an atheist class. And then you get to where you started, where it's just better to be taught outside public schools.

I would not keep my child from attending either the evolution class or the bible class based only on my beliefs, since the child needs to be informed to make their own choices and form their own beliefs. How would a child benefit from being shown only one side of the story?

I think it'd be great if they offered a general "world religions" type of class, and made it more like a history class than "bible study" . The history and ins and outs of each religion are very interesting, and I think it'd be great for children to learn about them.

I do want to add here. In my daughters Gifted Social Studies class they are studying the different religions in the middle east. They got quite indepth as well with the people who started it and when and their followers. Didn't bother me in the least.

People who will not listen to a theory or belief that doesn't agree with their own are afraid that their own belief will be changed.

If person's faith in their own belief is strong enough, listening to, learning about, or letting their children learn about another belief should not threaten them.

I believe in choice. As an example, said my parents were Catholic and I went to Parochial schools. As I grow and get older and more independent, I may choose to expand my religious or spiritual journey and explore other ideas. I may become a Muslim, or a Buddhist or Lutheran or Pentecostal. A child can be taught *only* the parents religion and when it's an adult, finds out there are lots of other thoughts and ideas out there that "speak" to them ... may harbor some resentment towards the parent for not allowing the child to grow into his/her own person.

-------

If the school is large enough to support the extra curriculum, I think having several of the major religions taught as electives. By "major", I mean Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Muslim, etc. Not "taught" as in "believe in this", but rather "taught" in the sense of studying it to learn it's effects on societies and cultures.

^^That is how it was handled in my daughters school. They did get into all of those religions and even a few more.

Speaking from personal experience, the best way to turn your child from the parental religion is to forbid everything else and to put down all the other religions. As a result I am not religious at all and more spiritual.

Edited by qhridinGA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm, wow, I just looked up the "creation museaum"... I don't know about that. I guess as long as that's not a "science" field trip I'd be ok with that. I just got to wonder what kids who aren't Christian may think about that place... or how some of their questions are going to be handled by the teachers.

I really wish I could read more... I'd LOVE to read about the "Dinosaur Den" and how "biblical history is the key to understanding dinosaurs". :twitch:

http://creationmuseum.org/

I agree with everyone else though... I have no problem with religion being studied in a humanities or social studies class. In fact, I think it's important. I've even had literature classes were some of our studies were books of the Bible. I just don't think that religion belongs in a science class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it is best to teach our children about the bible at home & in the Church, as their are many conflicting opinions regarding the Bible among different Christian groups. A basic begining in history of when different religions began might benefits students, as they are part of the cultures of different regions & countries. PD

Edited by Peppers Dad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I voted 'no' because of the phrasing of the question. "Bible classes" Now, if the question was "Should the history of Religion be taught in schools?" I might have had a different answer. 'Bible' classes assume Christianity at (lots of religions don't use the Bible), and makes it sounds like a study of the Bible, such as should occur in church.

I would imagine that a fact based study on the history of Christianity (and many other religions) itself might not be so popular if it truly covers the HISTORY of that religion, and the things that have been done in it's name. There is some really disturbing factual history associated with religions. Perhaps if school children were taught such things, we would stand a better chance to stop repeating history as frequently as our species seems to.

In the meantime, a day's lecture on the scientific theory of evolution, held during a science class seems appropriate, for reasons many others have already stated.

As a parent with strong religious based views on the subject, it seems that this would be an EXCELLENT way to segue into a family discussion over dinner about YOUR families beliefs and why you believe that way. Study up in advance so that you can anticipate some questions and come up with logical, fair answers to the questions your daughter may have. Turn it into a positive learning experience for the whole family.

Edited by DawnC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm, wow, I just looked up the "creation museaum"... I don't know about that. I guess as long as that's not a "science" field trip I'd be ok with that. I just got to wonder what kids who aren't Christian may think about that place... or how some of their questions are going to be handled by the teachers.

I really wish I could read more... I'd LOVE to read about the "Dinosaur Den" and how "biblical history is the key to understanding dinosaurs". :twitch:

http://creationmuseum.org/

I agree with everyone else though... I have no problem with religion being studied in a humanities or social studies class. In fact, I think it's important. I've even had literature classes were some of our studies were books of the Bible. I just don't think that religion belongs in a science class.

Um, wow. I think I live a very sheltered liberal-college-town life, I thought comedians made up stuff like "creation museums" aaaaanyway... To the OP If you like your religion thats great but someone posted on here a while ago:

Religion is like a *reproductive organ*

you may love yours

But don't bring it out in public

and dont force it on my kid.

there. that was as PG friendly as I could make it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creationism is said to be a faith-based theory, but I believe that the same label can also be applied to evolution. Why? Because neither one can actually be proved by modern studies. It takes faith to believe either one -- and I choose creation because it's the one that makes the most sense to me.

When I look at a painting, a clock, or a car, I know that someone took the time to put it all together and make the parts work smoothly. It's the same thing with the natural world. I believe in a God who lovingly created every living thing on this planet and cares for their daily needs -- including people. Many of the animals and plants in this world are so beautiful and so amazing in their design that they could not have come about by chance. Something had to have created them.

However, although I am a staunch creationist, I think that evolution and creation should be taught side by side in public schools -- not as facts, but as theories, so that students could hear both sides of the issue and make up their own minds about which one THEY believe is right. And I do disagree with the idea that if someone ISN'T taught evolution, that they're totally going to be behind in life. Well, I WASN'T taught it in the schools I went to (I attended private schools that taught only creation and later public schools that didn't put much emphasis on it one way or the other), and I don't feel like I'm totally out of the loop because I'm clueless about evolution. Most people believe that the teaching of evolution is vital to one's education ONLY because it's ALL they've ever been taught. Many of these people who slam creationists for being close-minded will absolutely refuse to consider the concept that maybe everything we see on this planet might have actually been created, not evolved.

Two of my biggest problems with evolution: it makes all life on earth meaningless because everybody and everything is just an "accident". And I also believe that the theory (yes, I DO call it a theory) of evolution was invented because, if human beings just evolved, rather than having been made by someone, that means that there is no creator to be accountable to. I'm sticking with creationism because, like I said previously, it not only makes more sense to me -- but also makes life much more meaningful to me as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creationism is said to be a faith-based theory, but I believe that the same label can also be applied to evolution. Why? Because neither one can actually be proved by modern studies. It takes faith to believe either one -- and I choose creation because it's the one that makes the most sense to me.

When I look at a painting, a clock, or a car, I know that someone took the time to put it all together and make the parts work smoothly. It's the same thing with the natural world. I believe in a God who lovingly created every living thing on this planet and cares for their daily needs -- including people. Many of the animals and plants in this world are so beautiful and so amazing in their design that they could not have come about by chance. Something had to have created them.

However, although I am a staunch creationist, I think that evolution and creation should be taught side by side in public schools -- not as facts, but as theories, so that students could hear both sides of the issue and make up their own minds about which one THEY believe is right. And I do disagree with the idea that if someone ISN'T taught evolution, that they're totally going to be behind in life. Well, I WASN'T taught it in the schools I went to (I attended private schools that taught only creation and later public schools that didn't put much emphasis on it one way or the other), and I don't feel like I'm totally out of the loop because I'm clueless about evolution. Most people believe that the teaching of evolution is vital to one's education ONLY because it's ALL they've ever been taught. Many of these people who slam creationists for being close-minded will absolutely refuse to consider the concept that maybe everything we see on this planet might have actually been created, not evolved.

Two of my biggest problems with evolution: it makes all life on earth meaningless because everybody and everything is just an "accident". And I also believe that the theory (yes, I DO call it a theory) of evolution was invented because, if human beings just evolved, rather than having been made by someone, that means that there is no creator to be accountable to. I'm sticking with creationism because, like I said previously, it not only makes more sense to me -- but also makes life much more meaningful to me as well.

While I respect your thoughts, evolution is a scientific, factually based theory. While creation is faith based. You can believe that evolution is faith based, but it doesn't make it any less scientific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this