mspaints

Spur Trained Horse

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I recently bought my daughter a new show horse because she lost her last horse but this new horse is being difficult to ride. While riding today, I told her to try to apply more leg like she had spurs on and he actually did what she wanted. I told her to take her legs off him and he stopped. I believe he is a spur trained horse and I actually have no idea how to tell her how to ride him. I would appreciate any help I can get for her to ride him. He does the "trop" and I was told he has been hock hobbled (have no idea what that is) and he was trained western pleasure. The people I got him from was having issues with him tropping when asked to move out in a trot and they were dressage people. I hate to see him being shipped from home to home because he is trained to the spur and no one knows how to ride him so any help would be great.

Thanks..

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That is an odd description of what he does, the only horse I have ridden that rides with constant contact and stops when you take your legs off is very highly trained reiner...., usually it is a heel roll for collection and a squeeze with both legs to rate back. try putting your outside leg in and pushing the horse forward into the bridle - this may make him faster than you want right now, but it is very important to start with the correct impulsion.

The spur training can fix the troping but you need to use it properly. So use your legs to move your horse up and into the bit, hold and roll your heel to lift up the back.

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Can you find out who originally trained this horse? If nothing else, find out from AQHA who owned him as a 2 year old and contact them. There should be no reason to have to try to figure him out when there is a trainer out there somewhere that you can talk to.

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I guess I forgot to mention he is an Appoloosa and not my normal AQHA or APHA and I am rather new to the Appy world. I know his papers are not accurate because the people I bought him from didn't register him in their name and only had him 6 months before sending him off again. I asked them who they got him from and they told me a name that I know is a known horse trader. I am trying to find out more information on who has owned him on his papers but it may take a while since I don't know anything about this association yet. I went to the horse trader Saturday and asked him (I know him personally because he helped me find her other horse that we lost) if he remembered who where and what but he said it's been a while so he has to think about it. More then likely he came from a Kentucky auction or something along those lines. He does get horses from some college auction there but I don't know which one. I am actively trying to find out more on him around here.

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I've seen several top western pleasure horses trained in the spur trained method. Almost bought one 3 years ago but didn't because my daughter was to young then to pick it up. These horses are highly trained to move off of leg or spur pressure instead of hands and reins. If you go to the world shows, the horses in these classes are usually trained that way. It's totally reverse of what I know.

I am going to try and find a trainer around here that trains that way and hopefully get a lesson or something from them because I hate to see him go if we can't make him work. I can't afford to have anymore horses that can't be ridden. I already have 1 retired show horse and 1 filly that has string halt and several that work. I know that sounds mean but we just got him so I have no attachment to him yet. My daughter does but she will be going to college in 2 years so I will be left with all the care of these horses. Thankfully I din't pay to much for him so I won't lose any money on him but would like to keep him if we can figure this out.

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Troping is when the horse canters in the front and trots in the back. It's what some trainers do to horses that are western pleaure bound. It looks like they are crippled with a massive head bob and they are "loping" slow. I personally can't stand it but, these horses tend to win classes so trainers still keep doing it. It's sick to watch sometimes.

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Troping is when the horse canters in the front and trots in the back. It's what some trainers do to horses that are western pleaure bound. It looks like they are

There is no troping horse that wins in AQHA unless there is nothing else to choose from, either you are mistaking a slow moving, suspended hock for a trope, or you are not going to very high level shows.

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I know the cutting horses that I ride are trained off leg commands. To stop you sit down and open your legs and they stop very quickly. Basically throw your reins away and just go off leg pressure. I had to re-learn how to ride when I started riding these horses.

Heels down, toes out, and slack reins is what I have been told to do. But without riding the horse, I wouldn't know what else to tell yea.

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Agreed. There is no upper level western pleasure horse in any of the stock horse breeds that four beats and places

This horse does not sound like he was in any credible training program, but' trained' by a bunch of wanta be pleasure horse trainers. hoCK hOBBLES!!!!!! nOW, THAT LETS ME KNOW IDIOTS trained this horse, whether you ride with the spur stop or not

Actually went to see my son's stallion that is in a reining horse program today, and just like the western pleasure trainers I respect,that reining trainer pointed out that you do not want to have to carry a horse every step of the way with either legs or spurs

The best horses, reining or western pleasure, are not micro managed or baby sat every stride, but learn to keep those shoulders up, drive from behind and stay evenly between the reins and at the speed the rider asks for. You might need to put legs on once in a while to correct, but you should not need to carry the horse with constant leg support any more than with constant rein support

JUst strapping on some spurs is not going to fix this horse, esp if spurs have been used incorrectly and he is now intimidated to move foreward. In fact, since he stops when not supported with legs, I would work on getting that foreward, instead of having him suck back .

You need correct movement first, esp on a horse that has had the spur stop used incorrectly on him.

If this horse truly had hock hobbles and a spur stop used on him, in my opinion, he might be very difficult to fix, and the answer isn't to use the same incorrect training methods that got him to this point in the first place

By the way, ApHC standards for western pl are the same as for AQHA, and a good western pl horse would have papers in order, been in the barn of a well known western pl trainer like Mark Shaffer (google him) and would not have gone the horse trader route-so let's not assume this horse was actually trained by any knowledgeable trainer, App or not

Edited by Smilie

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OK,

I've found out that he has been to the world show 5 years ago and the people that owned him then, were nuts. They are no longer married and the husband trained him along with a bunch of horses they had. The new trainer came in and said "I can't fix these horses. They have been ruined beyond repair." Some of them went to some kind of breeders sale and others just went away. Our guy went through the sale and ended up with a young girl that had high hopes for him. Well he didn't last long there because he would buck her off everytime they went into an arena. He was great in the make up pen but when they were showing, He just blew up. Go figure. Then he went to another person (per the girls trainer) and he started bucking all the time when rode in the lope. He went to mostly youth homes then. He stayed there for about 4 months then ended up at a vet's barn (I have no idea how he got there or why) and stayed there for a year and she sold him to a client for her daughter because her horse had some kind of feet issues. This girl was suppose to have shown him 4-H and some open shows and did well with him and took him to some breed shows as well. These were the last owners on his papers but they sold him to a friend and that was the last they saw of him. The friend is not who I bought him off of. I can track about 4 years of his history after being sold at the first sale but not the last year. Needless to say I have talked to the first owners and she is going to try and help with him but if he can't be fixed I am going to find him a permament home as a pasture pal or trail buddy and never to be a show horse again.

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Put some spurs on and get on and do some stuff and see how he is trained.

If he needs constant pressure...he ain't no cutter.....I can tell ya that.

Spurs...yes....but if you apply constant pressure on a cutting horse...you wouldn't get anywhere...not to mention he might toss ya out the saddle or something.

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While riding today, I told her to try to apply more leg like she had spurs on and he actually did what she wanted. I told her to take her legs off him and he stopped. I believe he is a spur trained horse and I actually have no idea how to tell her how to ride him.

That does not sound like a spur trained horse, in fact it is quite the opposite. With a spur trained horse, the horse slows down or stops when you apply leg pressure, not when you release it. A spur trained horse won't stop when you take your legs off of him, he is trained to do the opposite.

I am guessing he was trained in a hodgepodge manner by many unskilled people, and is probably so incredibly confused by now no wonder he started acting up with previous owners! Horses need consistency in training styles!

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