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JulieAnneMoore

Clinton Anderson's Downunder Horsemanship

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Love my new Clinton Anderson book. Wow he explains things so black and white, there is no shades of grey in his explanation. I worry a little about my own ability, I have no rhythm, I am not that coordinated, and I find it hard to focus on more then one thing at a time. But hopefully with a little work I can improve on these things, well at the same time building a better partnership with Lacey.

Questions:

What do I need to get to work on these exercises. Almost all of his exercises call for Rope Halter, 14 foot lead rope, and a Handy stick. I am such I can find a good rope halter and lead rope at most of the tack stores I shop at. But I am at a lost of what to do about the Handy Stick. I want to have the right tools to better be able to do the exercises, but to buy from Clinton's site is too much, $60+ $35 shipping + tax for a Canadian. :twitch: With any normal whip it is to flimsy or it have to much bite, how do I find the right tool for the job.

Also he suggest using boot on the horse. Should I buy boots for my horse or not. What are the purpose of splint boots. Should I be using them or not. (I trail ride, and would like to start do some simple pattern riding this summer).

Edited by SohCahToa

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I like CA's methods too. He has a gift for teaching people how to get along with their horse.

I made my own "stick" out of 1" PVC pipe (the white kind) and a bike handle grip from wally world. I ground the end down so there were no sharp edges and it works perfectly. It cost me about $8.oo to make, and I've had it for about 12 years now.

My hubby drilled a hole through the end of it too, so I could attach a string.

I boot my horses. It's just extra insurance against injuries that could set you back. I ask a lot from my horses and I feel like I should give them every advantage possible. Valley vet has SMB 3's on sale right now for $99.00 for a four pack. Be sure and get the right size so they fit right.

Good luck and have fun!

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Are SMB-3 Sports Medicine Boots what I need?

They looks like a great boot. But I do not understand what the boot are suppose to do.

Does my horse need boots? Would she benefit from boots?

What are the disadvantages, I read one place "SMB are harmful because they tend to hold heat in." and another that they are harmful if not used properly (What is proper use?).

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I love Clinton Anderson's program and we have had great success with it for a number of years. But we have never booted our horses and I don't really see a need for it. If you are really asking horse to be super athletic, you may need to boot for extra protection, but for most of us average horseowners, I don't think you need boots to start.

Good luck with the program!

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I use a normal lunge whip...if I don't want the "string" to be used I simply wind it around the shaft of the whip and hold it along with the handhold and then just use the tip. I also use leads of various sizes that I have made from yachting rope or climbing rope or even good soft 1 inch cotton rope....a good bullsnap (with a swivel) and a good clamp will make one of these easily....I have them ranging from 6 feet (almost never use) up to about 35 feet (lets me work in a 45-50 foot round pen and control the head position without steady pressure on the horse...use this one more often)...the one used most of the time is 20 feet long. I'm NOT a great fan of buying the gadgets from various trainers....use their methods if they make sense to me and work well for me and the horse but most horse equipment is very very similar no matter whose design it is.

Splint boots are protective...they keep a horse from clipping himself on the lower leg as he moves around...a hoof clip hurts and has the ability to chip, fracture or cause the splint bone to pull away from its tendon or periosteal covering...causing some damage (sometimes requires surgery to fix, sometimes leaves just a bump on the inside of the lower leg that is considered to be a blemish and which can cause some buyers to back away)....these are called "splints" and can cause short term lameness all the way to surgically repaired damage with time off. Most of the splint boots out there now also have a support function with the strap that wraps under the fetlock joint...how well these actually work is still under discussion but it isn't going to hurt to have more support for the joint. Yes, a leg will get sweaty under the boots but you take them off when done working and hose the legs off removing any sweat and dust or dirt that gets in there. Rinse the boots off as well. A good set, well treated, can last for years and are worth the investment. Make sure to get the size that goes with your horse and look up how to put them on (some have instructions included in the package). You can use them on trail rides as well as during training. Another option would be polo wraps (much less expensive) but you need to know how to put them on correctly (wrapping a horse's leg the right direction and with the right tension...you can find someone to teach you...they do take more time to put on and have to be washed after a couple uses so are more work as well).

Your initial work with your horse will likely be fairly slow (and should be so that you both figure out what to do....speed always causes horse brains to backtrack a little on the learning curve...get it right/correct before asking for faster). You may not need splint boots at first but any time you ask a horse to move sideways (moving shoulders over or moving hips over) you are increasing the risk of a foot clipping the nearest leg.

Edited by coloredcowhorse

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coloredcowhorse thanks. I am thinking I will wait and see. I am worrying about the disengaging the hindquarters and yielding the forequarters. I am also thinking about trying barrel is I can find some one to teach me. So wondering if I should by the SMBs and only use them when I need them.

Back to the handy stick,

What about this one, is it equivalent to Clinton's without his name making the price so much? fiberglass is more sturdy then an average lunge whip right?

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coloredcowhorse thanks. I am thinking I will wait and see. I am worrying about the disengaging the hindquarters and yielding the forequarters. I am also thinking about trying barrel is I can find some one to teach me. So wondering if I should by the SMBs and only use them when I need them.

Back to the handy stick,

What about this one, is it equivalent to Clinton's without his name making the price so much? fiberglass is more sturdy then an average lunge whip right?

Before worrying about doing barrels I would want a horse really well broke to riding and to handling on the ground. I think I mentioned my roper friend...he patterns his ropers on both barrels and poles as well as in the roping box and takes a year to do it and get it perfect....there's no rush.

Since you aren't going to be using your "handy stick" to whack on your horse (unless he is aggressive toward you...then you use it to enforce "back the heck up now!...later lesson on that!) it really doesn't matter what it is..you can use a fairly stiff willow switch if you want to. It needs to be about 4-6 feet long and firm enough that you can use it to rub on the horse..if it can have a "string" tied to the end of it it is even more useful. A driving whip, lunge whip, piece of PVC...all useful. It is HOW you use it that makes it effective, not what it is made of.

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Before worrying about doing barrels I would want a horse really well broke to riding and to handling on the ground. I think I mentioned my roper friend...he patterns his ropers on both barrels and poles as well as in the roping box and takes a year to do it and get it perfect....there's no rush.

My horse is a broke horse, just only done trail riding most of her life. She barrel raced years back before I owned her. I just want to work on the exercises from Clinton's book to work on leadership and trust. As well as teach my horse skill like yield her forequarters and disengage her hindquarters.

Since you aren't going to be using your "handy stick" to whack on your horse (unless he is aggressive toward you...then you use it to enforce "back the heck up now!...later lesson on that!) it really doesn't matter what it is..you can use a fairly stiff willow switch if you want to. It needs to be about 4-6 feet long and firm enough that you can use it to rub on the horse..if it can have a "string" tied to the end of it it is even more useful. A driving whip, lunge whip, piece of PVC...all useful. It is HOW you use it that makes it effective, not what it is made of.

Just want to make sure I have the right tools before I try the exercises.

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I purchased Clinton's handystick and rope halter several years ago. I am sure - if you can't afford his prices, that you can find similar sticks on other websites. Shop around the internet. It is worth buying these items. They last forever if taken care of. Also, I do not boot my horse when doing his groundwork exercises. If your horse comes close, overreaches, etc, then I think it is important to boot him/her. Good luck and have fun! :yahoo:

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I purchased Clinton's handystick and rope halter several years ago. I am sure - if you can't afford his prices, that you can find similar sticks on other websites. Shop around the internet. It is worth buying these items. They last forever if taken care of. Also, I do not boot my horse when doing his groundwork exercises. If your horse comes close, overreaches, etc, then I think it is important to boot him/her. Good luck and have fun! :yahoo:

I am going back and forth on what I should do. I Have finished the book and love it. I am now just wanting to get the right tools. I plan on using Clinton's and similar method on Lacey as well as all future horses. So I am think of paying the $111 for the halter and handy stick. But I do not know if I am crazy for thinking about doing that.

I found a handy stick on one other site but do not know if I can trust the site or if it is good quality, and I cannot find a good rope halter anywhere.

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Try this...you can use nylon rope or even cotton clothesline rope (find it in hardware stores or some grocery stores)....

http://www.naturalhorsesupply.com/tiehalter.shtml

Western Horseman magazine also has instructions either in an article or in their on-line articles...can't remember which.

Save a LOT of money and tie your own. Same thing with the handy stick....any fairly stiff 4 foot long piece of something that you can tie an additonal 4 foot long piece of lunge whip lash (from an old one for instance) or anything about that size/wt will work very well. It is NOT the particular piece of equipment but the use you make of it and the manner in which you use it that makes it effective.

Edited by coloredcowhorse

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It is NOT the particular piece of equipment but the use you make of it and the manner in which you use it that makes it effective.

I second (third? fourth?) that! I have also tied my own halters for a fraction of the cost. There is nothing magical about Clinton's equipment. YOU are the most important tool, and, when it comes down to it, really the only one you need.

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You can get cheap handi stick knockoffs on Ebay for just over 20 bucks. 30 with shipping. Just search training stick I think it is. They are worth it and come in colors. Better than a lungwhip by 100000%.

Any rope halter will do, but honestly, clintons are made from the best rope and have a great feel to them. I think they are well worth the cost to get his name brand halter for a serious training halter. It will last forever if you take care of it.

I DONT use SMBs. I had a set for years and just never used them so I sold them. I think they can weaken a horses legs over time and are a crutch. Kind of like back brack or a brace of any kind. If you dont use it you loose it. If your having issues with tendons I think you have more problems than a boot can help or fix. A properly trimmed normal healthy hoof with a short toe and breakover is not likely to be injured unless he has terrible conformation or is just really clumsy or unlucky. Between all my friends and myself, none of us have every had a tendon injury ever and none of use use leg protection. We trail ride a TON including navigating some scary stuff and jumping obsticals and all of us in general do Clinton style training. We are all barefoot however and I think th at makes a big difference.

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I have always tried to be frugal when it comes to my horse and equipment. There is one thing I have learned over the years and that is often you "get" what you pay for. My first long lead rope was just the hardware store variety and I had a few of those 8 dollar tack shop rope halters. Certainly I could practice the exercises and get results so I was content. One day I borrowed one of Clinton's set from another boarder and I couldn't believe the difference in how expensive rope feels in my hands and how it transfers the energy from my hands to the horse. Just a little wiggle at one end of a 14 foot rope goes all the way to the other. Clinton's "Handy Sticks" are a bit like that too. I have used just about every tool I could pick up in a pinch to help motivate a horse but those handy sticks are made tough. The first one I ever bought is still with me and one time I had to glue the string holding tip back on because I was smacking the ground so hard it came off. I've been doing that to it for 8 years or so now and only suffered that one failure.

Good equipment doesn't make one a good trainer but good tools do make just about any job easier. Like anything of value it is an investment that should serve well and last a long time.

Just another thought on it,

William (historyrider)

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Stick and String on Ebay

I have one of these pictured in the link above. The guy that sells them is actually a clinition in my area and taught me the CA way...he was very helpful. (My main thing was the shoulder yeild, had issues with that one). I bought mine straight from Marvin and he is nice guy. I don't know where he gets them but I know he sells tons of them, and halters too. His Mare pictured on the ad holding the stick is trick trained, very fun to watch. I have had mine for about 6 years now, and with a quick wipe down it still looks new...well made.

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Stick and String on Ebay

I have one of these pictured in the link above. The guy that sells them is actually a clinition in my area and taught me the CA way...he was very helpful. (My main thing was the shoulder yeild, had issues with that one). I bought mine straight from Marvin and he is nice guy. I don't know where he gets them but I know he sells tons of them, and halters too. His Mare pictured on the ad holding the stick is trick trained, very fun to watch. I have had mine for about 6 years now, and with a quick wipe down it still looks new...well made.

thanks so much. I went to Marvin Thomey Wedsite . $68 for the three pieces I am looking for. They look good quality.

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I'm glad you found what you needed for a decent price. Same stuff as the Big Boys sell, without the name brand cost.

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SMB's is up to you. I was going to boot my 2yo one day, got sidetracked and forgot. Well, while in the roundpen doing direction changes, she scraped herself down the inside of her front leg and injured her suspensory. I kick myself in the butt everytime I think about it. It's a precaution you can or don't take.

From now on, I plan on putting them on horses that I am working with just because it's safer. Can't afford those big vet bills.

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@ Historyrider I see you are still pimping for CLinton Anderson after Years and years of sales ya gotta ask whats your kickback?

@ Willy ShoeMaker I purchased Clinton's handystick and rope halter several years ago. I am sure - if you can't afford his prices, that you can find similar sticks on other websites. Shop around the internet.

I agree. Shop around. Ready to go, cya!

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I order the tools from Marvin Thomey Wedsite . $80 for the three pieces with shipping. On the conformation email he included a guild to his method of training. It is just cliff notes of Clinton's book. Same exercises, same order, and same steps. But is is nice to have a quick reference to refer too.

Question 2: what to do about an arena. My horse is not a overly aggressive horse, worse she does is not pay attention, and try to drift in the duration that she wants to go, commonly to the barn. But some of the exercises call for fence work and arena work. Any suggestions what I can do?

I have her pasture, but I think that is too big and not great fence to work against.

I have her paddock, it has 4 foot high board fence, but there is a lot of ledge in it and she can get to her stall. I could make a dutch door for her stall though. It is over 50 feet by 200 feet in size.

...or I could fence something across the road on flater ground.

suggustions? :questionicon:

Edited by SohCahToa

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Fence work....any long, flat sided structure...can be the side of the barn, a long stock trailer, a real fence (best not to use wire ones as some horses just have to try to go through them).

Arena....any flat open area, preferably fenced, with decent footing so the horse won't slip, slide or fall due to footing. Most county fairgrounds will have one (and if they have a grandstand you would also have a good fence to work against. Way before I had a round pen I started horses in an open field.

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But some of the exercises call for fence work and arena work. Any suggestions what I can do?

When I had my "one on one" session with Marvin, we just used a pasture fence. He suggested using different types of fences, in different areas facing different directions too. We even used the side of the barn. As far as the Arena, we used an open pasture. Anywhere flat.

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