Katie Schuur

Is There An Easy Way To Get Ticks Out Of The Ear?

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For some reason Tuff decided to run into a huge patch of ticks... I deworm him regularly, and just gave him a dose of ivermectin yesterday for good measure. I noticed that he wouldn't let me touch his ear which is unusual behavior for him, because I raised him from the time that he was a little baby to always allow me to touch him everywhere. Upon closer inspection of the ear, I saw a couple of ticks had made their home there. He wouldn't let me get the dang ticks!! I tried everything but all we ended up doing was fighting! He even reared up on me it got so bad. So I figured I would come here and ask if there is some kind of magical something-or-other that I can do??? Any suggestions?

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I don't think Ivermectin will kill ticks, they are insects, and Ivermectin is an anthelicide for worms. You may have to just put some terpentine, or eucalyptus oil on a q-tip, and brush the ticks butts so they let go. Just be careful they don't go further into the ear canal.

Then put some Vetricyn on the ears to heal any punctures from the ticks.

I swear by this stuff, and it has done wonders even near my mare's eye.

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I don't think Ivermectin will kill ticks, they are insects, and Ivermectin is an anthelicide for worms. You may have to just put some terpentine, or eucalyptus oil on a q-tip, and brush the ticks butts so they let go. Just be careful they don't go further into the ear canal.

Then put some Vetricyn on the ears to heal any punctures from the ticks.

I swear by this stuff, and it has done wonders even near my mare's eye.

Thanks so much for your response, however Tuff won't even let me TOUCH his ear :( :(

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When I use to assist a vet & we had to remove ticks from an ear we ALWAYS tranquilized the horse.

Here is an article about ticks & the problems w/them you SHOULD read; http://www.thoroughbredtimes.com/horse-health/1994/june/27/ticks-and-horses.aspx

Here is one more; http://www.ehow.com/how_7676046_remove-tick-horse.html

GOOD LUCK! HTTY

Edited by horsewise

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Do you know how to twitch? You should either tranquilize him or twitch him and get it out. Twitching is a good skill to know.

When we had our wrestling match the other day, I really, really wished I had a twitch. I resorted to TRYING to twitch him with just my hand alone but of course that got me nowhere. I think I'm going to go ahead and invest in a twitch, and if all else fails I'll probably just need the vet to come out and tranq him.

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I LOVE LOVE LOVE my twitch. I can't even count the times it has been useful. Layla broke had a cut just above her eye. We were doctered it for over a month and we wouldn't have been able to do it without it. Turns out a peice of the bone later broke off. My vet didn't even know it was broke on the origional vet visit. Pulled a rather large peice of bone out of it 3 weeks later.

Mine is just a rope and a short stick pretty much. I prefer it to a chain as it has less pinch. :winking:

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you can make one with a horseshoe and bailing twine, but it is pretty harsh, squeezing the nose never worked for me either. I don't like the one man twitches as much as the chain twitches - but you do need two people to work one. Good luck!

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my vet twitches a pinch of skin in the neck to shoulder area...the spot where you check for dehydration...

she says that way the horse can't predict what the twitch is for and is just as effective.

I dunno....never tried it ...

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Back in the day on the farm, grandpa used diesel fuel in a little spray bottle directly on the tick....tick backs out and dies...

Lighter fluid works faster....

Caution!~ keep away from open flame till fuel vapors are gone!:winking: and do not smoke while applying....!!!

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By the time the vet gets out to you, the tick will have already released itself and gone its merry way :indifferent:

You're going to have to start de-sensitizing him all over again, from Square One :smilie:

Hopefully he's not a horse that has bad allergic reaction to tick bites. One of my four does and it's never a pretty site. He's gelded but when I miss tick on my daily checks, he almost doesn't look like he's a gelding :twitch:

The Vetricyn is probably best to help heal the tick bite that's already there. I would start lightly massaging the outside of his ears with a piece of paper towel and slowly work my way to the inner edges.

Don't look up at him; it's been my experience that eye-to-eye contact for this particular "thing" doesn't do anything to help the process along.

I get quicker results with all four of my horses if I look down at the floor. I found that out by complete accident because I have a good case of vertigo; if I hold my head upward for too long, I pass out.

Once you make some "inner ear" progress with the paper towel spray some Vetricyn on it, or take some hemerhoid ointment and lightly rub it in his ear. Hemerhoid ointment is my favorite because it reduces skin swelling and takes the itch out.

As far as something to keep the ticks out of his ears, in the spring I make a mix of Patchouli Oil/mineral oil/water and use it on my horse that's allergic to tick bites. It works for awhile, then I have to find something else.

My other three horses are on garlic and don't get ticks in their ears. The guy with the worst allergies has ulcer issues so I can't feed it to him.

Another thing to get him used to having the insides of the ears fussed with: Buy some of those knubby garden gloves at Tractor Supply or WalMart. My horses LOVE LOVE LOVE to have the insides of their ears massaged with them :yahoo:

I massage everyone's ears nearly every day, that way when it's time to really have to do something, I don't get near as much spit from them :angel3:

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This is another place we use a 1/4 inch string under a horse's lip. Works as well as a twitch for most things and actually teaches a horse to 'give up' and let you work on it.

Ticks are really bad around here and every time I have a horse raise its head when I go to bridle it I can count on a tick or two in it.

I put a drop of Ivomec on my thumb and rub it in an ear and it keeps ticks out for quite a while.

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Frontline Spray. Its actually DESIGNED to be used on the skin, unlike some of the other suggestions here that are potentially dangerous. It will also work as a preventive for further infestations.

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Ingredients in Frontline:

Most chemicals that are pesticides are petroleum based

Frontline Top Spot

Merial Limited, Iselin, NJ

(800) 660-1842 or frontline.com

Active ingred: 9.7% fipronil

Inert ingred: 90.3% (not disclosed)

(MSDS indicates inerts include ethanol

7.7%, polyvinlpyrrolidone 6.9%,

butylhydroxytoluene 0.3%,

butlyhydroxanisole 0.3%, and carbitol

[diethylene glycol monoethyl ether])

(Note: Frontline Plus is essentially the same

as Frontline Top Spot, but with the addition

of 8.8% methoprene, an IGR.)

http://www.apnm.org/publications/resources/fleachemfin.pdf

warnings

This product is for external use on dogs and cats 8 weeks or older. Consult a veterinarian before using on medicated animals, animals using this product with other pesticides, and debilitated, aged, pregnant or nursing animals. This product is flammable. Keep away from heat and open flame. This product is harmful to humans if swallowed or absorbed through the skin. If swallowed, call a poison control center or physician immediately. Have patient sip water. Do not induce vomiting unless advised to and patient is conscious. If on skin or clothing, take off contaminated clothing and rinse skin with plenty of water for 15 to 20 minutes. See package label for treatment if in eyes or if product is inhaled. Persons applying this product must wear latex gloves.

In actuality , Diesel and lighter fluid is safer :winking:

Its just up to the individual...

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