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katmerlin

Twh?

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Hi everyone! It's been a while since I've been on here. I have a friend who is looking for another horse, her requirements are: child safe/sane, trail worthy, shorter, but strong enough for her hubby to learn on. So my question, should I recommend a TWH? The only gaited breed I have dealt with is my Icelandic. Absolutely love him and she loves him too but icey's are a bit out of her price range. From what I've seen of twh they are just as level minded as the icey though I haven't had the priviledge of riding one yet. From what i've read online they seem like a good fit but I'd like to hear from people who actually trail ride their twh. Thanks in advance!

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Hi backatcha! As you already know, there's good and bad in all breeds. Walkers are generally a good start for them or maybe a Rocky Mountain horse. They can be pricey too but nowadays you can find about anything at a good price! Good luck, and happy horse hunting!

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I will second a mountain horse. Rocky Mountain, Kentucky Mountain, Spotted mountain and the like wise. They are all fabulous!

~stars

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I'm not sure what this horse's job will be.

If it's to be a "first horse" for somebody who's never ridden to learn on I'd recommend a trotter of some sort. Learning on a trotting horse will build a better seat, better balance, better feel for the horse's movement, and a better appreciation for the gaited horse when the switch is made after a couple of years. :smilie:

Frankly, most gaited horses are so easy to ride they allow the development of sloppy habits and do not adequatly challenge a new rider. This observation tends to raise the hackles on a lot of gaited horse enthusiats, but after 20+ years messing with Walkers and Marchadors (among others) including running a 4H Horse program for five years that I'm satisfied to a moral certainty that I'm right!!!!!!!

In any event, I'd never advise anybody to buy a horse to learn on. Take lessons on a series of rentals. This also makes a better rider by laying a stronger foundation.

G.

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I will have to say. Get what you want, and what you want to have for a long time. There isn't a lot of point to getting a horse, that you plan on getting rid of in a couple years. Do your research, try a LOT , and I mean A LOT of horses before you find the one you want.

RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH. :)

~stars

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I will have to say. Get what you want, and what you want to have for a long time. There isn't a lot of point to getting a horse, that you plan on getting rid of in a couple years. Do your research, try a LOT , and I mean A LOT of horses before you find the one you want.

RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH. :)

~stars

Actually, getting rid of the first horse you start on makes a great deal of sense.

A first horse for most folks should a be dead broke, aged, well trained gelding. These horses make great teachers because they allow a student to learn the basics of equitation in a reasonable safe environment.

They are also as boring as watching paint dry once you've learned as much as you can from them. At that point sell the beast to another beginner and buy something with more "pizzaz" that will challenge the newly developed skills and allow the devopment of new ones. Ride this one for a while, then be ready to sell it to another intermediate rider.

Then buy something for the long haul.

I know this violates the PC "horse for life" concept but there it is.

G.

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I have a friend who is looking for another horse, her requirements are: child safe/sane, trail worthy, shorter, but strong enough for her hubby to learn on. So my question, should I recommend a TWH?

I'd like to hear from people who actually trail ride their twh

Sounds like she needs to look for a horse who is child safe, husband safe, trail worthy, shorter, but stout... of any breed.

I trail ride my TWH (you can see pics of him on the conformation board).

Likes: he is very confident, goes anywhere you point him, crosses anything, no spook, no buck, no bolt, but very "forward". Big ground-covering stride, smooth gait.

Dislikes: you must ride him correctly or he will pace; stock horses can't keep up with his walk unless they are trotting; he doesn't canter.

There are lots of pros and cons to consider but at the end of the day, every horse is an individual and should be evaluated as such.

Rather than limiting a search to a particular breed, I would suggest she consider any individual horse that meets her criteria. Good luck!

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My 24yo TWH still tends to be rather forward on trail too... but then that's what they were bred for - to cover ground comfortably undersaddle. Many gaited horses tend towards forwardness.

You will find a truly well trained trail horse is not cheap, though she may be able to find an older trail horse at a reasonable price. That's really what I would suggest for a first time horse anyway. My first trail horse was a 19yo Appaloosa who was very trail safe and had lots of get up and go left. We'd often finish a 3 - 4hr leisurely trail ride- while other horses were ready to load up and go home, Harley wanted to keep on riding! Loved that guy. He was still quite sound at 25 but had gone totally blind from ERU.

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I love my TW gelding (at least that is what he might be) He is Mr. Steady Eddy.. that said, he does have his moment, but he is still under 10. he is awesomely smooth, and easy to work with.. he is great with the kids, the smaller the more nervous the rider, the slower, amd smaller the steps are. He has brains, he will do and go anywhere i ask as long as i give him a moment to work it out..

Ok that said, I have ridden a few others in recent years.. and those I would not put kids on.. they are just to UP..

I have hear RM horses are born with a mellow already trained personality.. they seem to be mellow from the day they are born..

I have heard Iceys can be one of the greatest little mounts, but I think if you have one who can really go, it might not be so good for young rider, they might get intimidated by the speed.

If I were them, I would look up ALL the gaited horses listed in their area, or a hair beyond, and try them out, ask if they can do a 4-7 day trial, and see if that particular individual meets their needs. Once they find the right one, it wont matter the breed it will be the right one for life. TW's can be good, but some can be very hot. Daniel has his calm reliable ways, till you enter 2-3 situations.

1 Show day, he really senses what is going on and really struts his stuff, get him around a race track, and man e really wants to show off, out on trails, he can be fast, and really like to go out on trails.. at these4 time, good for kids, heck no... but get him away form those areas and he is back to mr. reliable steady eddy.. just the way he is, I just make sure kids are not around or on him at those time.

the horse they want needs to me more reliable, especially with a family!

Good luck on the hunt.. I say look around, try a lot out, them make a decision!

as much as I am not fond of Guilherme, I do agree that gaited horses dont build a proper seat, they do allow a lazy seat as they are sooo easy to ride.. I can attest to this as I ride Daniel most, and then correct the kids horses when i am not riding him, and NON of them are gaited.. so I have to use muscles that just dont get used on Daniel! and I tell you what I am sore as heck after that too!!

Edited by kitten-kat

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We are looking at a TWH at a rescue. He is 10yrs jet black. I'd say about 14.2-15 hands. Seems to have a nice mellow personality on the ground. Will need a bit of training under saddle nothing major. He is very stiff. Nothing really seems to phase him at this piont. Will try taking him out on the trails this weekend. My friend has been working with him on the ground all week and she is loving his personality. This is not her first horse. She currently owns a Thouroghbred, she wants this guy as the once in awhile hubby horse, her kids can ride but the TB is 17h and intimidates them.

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Forgot to say that he is registed and once I see his pedigree I'll let you know his blood lines. Maybe you guys will know what he's bred for, lines wise.

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He's stiff physically, but nothing is wrong with him. I guess his story is that a guy owned him and didn't do any formal training just get on and go. He's been out of work for about a year so he's a bit plump and doesn't have any flexibility.

Merlin's doing awesome! He's 30 now and still attcking the trails like he's 10. He's about 75% blind as well.

Odin is dealing well with his heaves beautifully. Keeping in shape helps a ton. I'm hooked on icelandics. He is such a blast.

Edited by merlinrules

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Every walker I have seen is a saint. They put up with all kinds of carp from their idiot riders.

I will have one when I'm old and sore.

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The stiffness isn't surprising, many walkers go in very lateral gaits and may travel in a stiff, ventro-flexed (hollow) frame... especially while pacing. Also, some riders train their walkers to gait in a stiff, high headed fashion.

A walker that is pacey can be extremely uncomfortable to ride (worse than a rough trot). Paciness can be a very frustrating and difficult problem to correct. Many of the 'show bred' walkers have actually been bred to be pacey; the pads used in the "big lick" TWH shows help "break up" the pace into a 4-beat gait.

I recommend that she try out this prospect's gaits before making a decision. A rough, poorly gaited horse can take the fun out of riding.

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My horse is a huge TW guilding and my wife has a female 3/4 Arab black and white pinto. Her Arab has one heck of a time keeping up on a trail ride. My TW is the cross between Dennis the Menance and Goofy. Once the saddle is donned he turns into a perfect horse. He is such a character that I ended up writing a book about him. I titled it Storm and the Magic Saddle. It was recently published as an ebook and is doing well with great reviews.

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Ihave a TWH/Arabian mix. While she is very loving towards me, she is by no means a calm ride. She may take more after arab side and is very hot. Other TWH I have met have been calm and loving. I also have a Rocky Mountain who is a mare and is a great girl. Sure footed, cares about me, and doesnt care for a female rider. Recently a friends little boy has been getting on her for rides, and she loves the little guy. We also have another TWH/QH mix who is sweet and is a 700 lbs brown lab. Finally we have a spotted saddle horse who is 21 and she is happiest when she is in front a hay pile.

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I agree with the posters so say try out a lot of horses. Even within the breeds, the gait can be so different.

We have a mixed herd. TWH, SSH, Racking, QH, Paint/Thoroughbred, and a QH/Hackney who is my pride and joy and gaits his little heart out. Each one moves differently and has a different job.

The TWH has a very loose gait. He looked super awkward as a colt and seemed to step on his own feet but he's grown into his feet and can gait right with the QH as the QH races around.

Our SSH mares, mother 9 and daughter 4, have gaits very different from each other. Both are very smooth but the daughter has a gait more like a classic TWH, high stepping and classy. Since the bloodlines have TWH in them, you never know what you'll get just by the SSH breed name.

Similarily, our racking mares (who are full sisters) also have very different gaits to each other. The 6 yo has the traditional racking/paddling motion while her younger sister has more of a classic Walker move.

My QH/Hackney throwback gelding is such a gem. He'll paddle his heart out regardless of terrain. He keeps up with every pure blood gaiter we have, and most of the time out gaits them. He'll also climb every hill like a billy goat; he and the 4 yo SSH mare make a game of racing over our Tennessee hills. My BIL calls him "Everready" because even when the rest of the group are spent after a trail ride, he's still running the fencelines as if to say "Is that all we're gonna do?"

Ok, sorry about the yapping about our herd, but I was trying to show how even within a breed, every horse has different motions and talents. Also, make sure you have a good ferrier who understands gaited horses. It can make a huge difference. Again, try each breed, each horse. Some will go right in the gait while others need a bit of guidance to find it. My Everready needs to have his head tucked just right, then its as smooth as can be...otherwise he'll beat you to death with his trot. lol gotta love him!

Rambling again, sorry! Good luck, and good riding!

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Whoa sorry I haven't been keeping up. Here's the update. Friend did end up adopting him and taking him home. She absolutely loves him. Beyond bomb-proof and she has thrown everyone on him and he takes very good care of the rider. His flexibility is so much better, now that he is in shape. His gaits are smoothing out as well. He makes me want a TWH, though its a close call to my icelandic.

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merlinrules,

Great that your TWH is working well for you, I bought a aged TWH mare 2 years ago, have not found her to the smoothest horse, but I've found her to be a honest horse. This past weekend I put my 8 year old grandaughter on her, & we rode together, she took good care of my grandaughter. I can't say enough good words about her, but I'm proud that she is part of my family of horses. PD

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Ok so horse is great now I need a saddle. I've tried a semi and full westerns. Saw some online saying walker bars. What does that mean? Flared front?

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