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LostHorseRider

How's He Look

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Last week on wendsday I had a lesson on Taylor. Light jumping (nothing over 18" and mostly X-rails) 30 Mintues or a little less. He was great.

Went to hack him the next evening and he felt off in the back end at the trot. Asked the few people standing around the arena and they said he looked off like heceas trying to canter in the back.

Got off put him in the round pen and he looked stiff on the back right.

Trainer looked at him the next morning. Heat above the hoof. With slight warmth up the front of the leg to just below the hock.

Cold hosed it. And left him checking every other morning. He stayed the same only having a bit of a head bob every now and then.

Only other thing we can find on him is a nick on the corrnet band he has had for a week prior to coming up lame.

No swelling.

Videos from today

I can't get him to the vet (on the vets end not mine) until Friday. And I'm ok with that since he's not like crippled.

He's on turnout rest. He is super chill in the pasture. So I don't worry about him making it worse.

Thoughts?

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I don't think so. It didn't cause him any issues for at least a week. I think he nicked a jump or trot pole with it. Or something like that.

Your right though. Who knows.

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To me, he looks worse going to the left. If I recall correctly...you had a video of him on FB at one point and I thought he was also moving worse to the left? Hmmm.

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Def off - looks hindend - at times I see SI/lower back - esp the way hes carrying himself. Doesnt he have something going on with his back and you have to have surgery on him or something? Has he had his hocks done? It is possible hes got changes (very likely as most horses do esp as they age) in the hocks and/or stifles and if hes working more and they start bothering him, he will start to compensate to make it feel better and ends up stressing another area by over using it. This is what happens with Layla - her right hock is worse and she will bring the left him under and over more to load that leg more and this in turn overworks her left stifle. She then would look off on the left hind but it was originating from the right.

I agreee its not a OMG get the vet out now situation but I think having them out on Friday is a good idea. I would expect flexions and likely xrays and prepare for possible injections. If it turns out to be his back or hocks but hes sore in the back, using a muscle relaxer like robaxin (methocarbonal *sp*) really helps them feel better. Layla loves the stuff.

Good luck. I hope you find some answers on Friday.

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Oh yes I'm prepared for flexions,x-rays,injections whatever. Dr. H is one of the best though and it normal doesn't take him long to figure things out. But at the same time saying that he has told me "you have brought me horses with problems you don't see offen and really make me think"(not exact words but something along those lines)

He has kissing spine witch is in the area right below the back of the saddle and behind it.

And I "think" that's why he short strides in the back. What's making the back right off I don't know.

Could be related could not be.

I don't think I can keep jumping this horse...I don't know that I have the heart to do it. Seems like every time I do he ends up at the vet and that's not what I want for him. :/

We will see what happens Friday.

I will try and Update y'all while I'm there. -love my iPhone-

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Just left the vet.

Blocked his right front. He was sound. Flexed all 4 legs. Stayed sound. X-rayed front right everything bone wise looked good but he has extreamly thin soles.

They are e-mailing me the x-rays. And I'll post them when I get them.

Said to durasole his feet and if that doesn't work to put him back in shoes.

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Well that sounds like a HUGE relief for you.

Toughen his soles and maybe put some shoes on.... I really wish Dr. H would have told me that was an answer at some point.

I was worried about Mr. Taylor and jingling that it wouldn't be anything serious.

Yay it's not! :yay:

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Thank you so much! I was worried to.

By far the simplest and easiest thing he has ever told me!

I'm going to give him a few weeks and I might put some shoes on him.

We will just see how it goes and I'll talk to my farrier/trimmer dude about it. See what he thinks. Might stick some pics and the X-rays over on the hood board. Idk

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Layla and Rex both tend to have thin soles - TBs in them I believe. When it was SUPER wet here last year, Rex and Layla both were tender esp up front. I use terpentine every other day (as long as their feet are dry) and Magic Cushion is money WELL SPENT. Some horses just need shoes - Ive been able to thicken up Rexs soles and its also been dry here now so no issues since last year. I also started him on "Kombat Boots" which is a natural yeast supplement that claims to help regrow a foot in 6 months - people who have testimonials for it have some interesting things to say - figured why not. It costs less than putting shoes on him right now. Really trying to keep him out of shoes as long as possible. But that is great that is all it is. Hopefully you can resolve it quickly.

Edited by KrazyTBMare

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Thank you for the info! Will the Magic Cushion stay in the barefoot hoof by itself? Or does it need ducktaped or something? I'm going to try and find some. It's been extreamly dry here.

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Some of it will come out but I find it best if you can put it on in the stall and once you pack it in (wear gloves!), put the foot down in the shavings so the shavings can stick to it and form a barrier of sorts. It doesnt stay in as well as a shod foot but it certainly works.

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I found SolePack. And got 2 packs of it. It is just the amount for one hoof per pack.

And Here is the link to Taylors Album on FB. Let me know if it works..I hope it does. I uploaded them to FB from my phone but I can not seem to get them uploaded to anything from my laptop..idk what the problem is.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/media/set/?set=a.10150314925910080.563622.583010079

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If I were you, I'd treat his soles, but I'd also put shoes on him. It'll make him feel better faster, and a lot of horses in full work, especially on variable ground, are comfier in shoes. Flame away, barefoot trim people. I think a lot of horses do well barefoot, and by the same token, there are a lot that are more comfortable in shoes. :smilie:

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If I were you, I'd treat his soles, but I'd also put shoes on him. It'll make him feel better faster, and a lot of horses in full work, especially on variable ground, are comfier in shoes. Flame away, barefoot trim people. I think a lot of horses do well barefoot, and by the same token, there are a lot that are more comfortable in shoes. :smilie:

Oh I agree with you 100%. But. He is prob not going to go back into jumping/full work. I think Mom is going to take him over. I would go ahead and put front shoes back on him but he was just trimmed about 2 weeks ago. He looks pretty good out in the sandy pasture not doing anything.

I don't have a problem putting him back in shoes if thats what it takes to keep him comfy. I'm not going threw a lot of hoopla of boots and such.

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If you get his feet taken care of and hes fine, why wouldnt you keep riding him? I think hes a really good horse for you and you are really make leaps and bounds in your riding. If hes sound and comfy, why give him up to your mom?

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ditto to KrazyTBMare. Thin soles is not a big deal, and he can totally keep jumping and working happily. Why give up the horse that you enjoy for that reason? Wait two weeks, stick shoes on, and go have fun.

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If you get his feet taken care of and hes fine, why wouldnt you keep riding him? I think hes a really good horse for you and you are really make leaps and bounds in your riding. If hes sound and comfy, why give him up to your mom?

I agree. If the doctor said he was sound and fine and is just tender footed, then I see no reason to not ride him. I don't think his back and all that has anything to do with it. My horse can be short strided and not that great when I have him on less than ideal footing barefoot.

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I love (yes I know) this horse so much. And everytime I start jumping him and I put him in full work something happens.

I don't want to hurt him anymore then he is..I enjoy riding and jumping him SO much. But at the same time I think I'm at the point I don't want to do it untill after he has the surgery. And I bring him back up and we won't have to worry if raising that one jump up is going to be to much..you know what I mean?

Witch every time I jump him it's like that. Is it going to be to much? If we raise this is he going to get sore? Is working on gymnastics going to make him sore? Did we do to many trot poles making him really lift and use his back going to make him sore and set us back again?

And it's so hard knowing if he is sore as he tries to hide it. Not to let you know. He just goes untill it's to much for him.

Then he screams it. And I don't ever want that to happen again..

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You're reading WAY too much into this. Understand that your current response is an emotional one, not a logical one. This has nothing to do with the horse's back; he has thin soles. As do MANY horses. And he will be sore whether it's jumping or standing out in the pasture if you don't work on his soles.

Saying you're never going to ride him again because he's a teensy bit foot sore is just way overdramatic. he doesn't "hide it until he's in so much pain he screams." He's very subtly off in those videos. Horses get stone bruises out in the pasture. If you're not going to ride him out of the fear that he *might* be sore later, don't ride ANY horse. They all *might* be sore afterwards...you're jumping under 2'6" and doing light flatwork. It's not like we're talking about a grand prix horse.

If I stopped riding Marly because he got sore once, I would have had to stop riding him the day I bought him. He's unusual and has had a lot of freak accidents, but after the fractured sesamoid, cracked hip, tieback surgery, and muscular disorder that he has...I can honestly say he's in the best shape/health of his life right now.

You like riding this horse. Put the effort into taking care of him to limit the soreness. Put shoes on him, give him a gram or two of bute after you have a hard jump lesson, maybe leave him in a stall and poultice/wrap if you feel necessary, and get on with it. Horses are athletes that do best with a job, not as a pasture ornament. Shevy is 23 and works 7 days a week, and barely looks like he's in his teens. Horses are healthier in real WORK.

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You're reading WAY too much into this. Understand that your current response is an emotional one, not a logical one. This has nothing to do with the horse's back; he has thin soles. As do MANY horses. And he will be sore whether it's jumping or standing out in the pasture if you don't work on his soles.

Saying you're never going to ride him again because he's a teensy bit foot sore is just way overdramatic. he doesn't "hide it until he's in so much pain he screams." He's very subtly off in those videos. Horses get stone bruises out in the pasture. If you're not going to ride him out of the fear that he *might* be sore later, don't ride ANY horse. They all *might* be sore afterwards...you're jumping under 2'6" and doing light flatwork. It's not like we're talking about a grand prix horse.

If I stopped riding Marly because he got sore once, I would have had to stop riding him the day I bought him. He's unusual and has had a lot of freak accidents, but after the fractured sesamoid, cracked hip, tieback surgery, and muscular disorder that he has...I can honestly say he's in the best shape/health of his life right now.

You like riding this horse. Put the effort into taking care of him to limit the soreness. Put shoes on him, give him a gram or two of bute after you have a hard jump lesson, maybe leave him in a stall and poultice/wrap if you feel necessary, and get on with it. Horses are athletes that do best with a job, not as a pasture ornament. Shevy is 23 and works 7 days a week, and barely looks like he's in his teens. Horses are healthier in real WORK.

Where did I say I was never going to ride him? I'm not worried about his feet. That's easy. I'm worried about his BACK. He does hide that it's getting sore untill he just can not take it anymore and starts bolting and bucking.

All I was pretty much saying was I am NOT putting him back to jumps untill after he has the surgery. Judge as you will it's to much stress on me and I don't want to make his BACK worse then it is. He IS going to get ridden. He is not going to get jumped or asked a lot of as far as using himself.

Marly has had problems I know but you fixed them and went back to work

Right now I can not fix him. I don't have the money for his surgery.

He is such the perfect horse I just...

I can't do this...not right now..

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I don't want to hurt him anymore then he is..I enjoy riding and jumping him SO much. But at the same time I think I'm at the point I don't want to do it untill after he has the surgery.

That would be where you made it sound as if you weren't going to ride him anymore. And in your last post, you mentioned that you won't be asking him to use himself or do much when you do ride.

I think we're gonna have to agree to disagree. I think he would be better in full work with muscle. You took him to an esteemed vet, who said he can work and jump without the surgery. This unsoundness has nothing to do with his back at all. He's not bucking, he's not bolting, and he's not sore. The vet said to work him; I'd work him!

Horses also don't tend to have such an emotional reaction to things hurting. I can almost promise you that he's not sitting there saying "I'm so sore, but I have to hide this soreness for my owner so she can still jump me, even when it hurts..." If he hurts, it shows. When he hurts, treat it accordingly. When he doesn't hurt, treat him like gold, but keep him in work and follow vet's instructions!

Marly isn't magically "fixed". He has a muscular disorder, that at the moment, he is still sound with. I take impeccable care of him so he remains sound. I've had quite a few vets not believe he is sound when looking at this file, then agree that they don't see anything wrong with him when they see him. Therefore, I take good care of him, and USE him. If they don't see an unsoundness and say go for it -- great, that's what I'm gonna do, who knows if he'll be sound longterm...but he is today, and would be a hellcat without his daily work, which he really enjoys. Very few horses have no issue whatsoever. It's how the owners take care of the issues and maintain the health that is important.

I get frusterated because I think this horse is really, really good for you. You really enjoy him and you two are a good partnership. This is the first horse that you've owned (out of what, 30?) that you've really liked and really enjoyed riding; this seems like the first one you've kept longer than 6 months. So why push the self-destruct button? Why not help him out and work with his issues to keep him sound? I don't understand why you don't seem to have the desire to make this work. His back issues are not life-or-death, never ride again sort of thing. Not according to the last details that you posted. I just want this to work for you and for you to stick with this little horse.

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I want to stick with him to. I just don't know what to do.

I guess part of it comes from planning on having the surgery done by the end of the year or very early next year. And just not seeing the point in working him up as far as jumping and then having to do it all over again and then some in 6 months.

He's going to get worked and fit. But more of a endurance horse fit then a hunter/jumper type fit.

I'm going to ride him some and so is mom but I'm not going to take him back into jumping, untill after the surgery.

Once we rehab and go back to work I plan on jumping him (as long as everything goes like it should) and not stoping.

Does that make more sence to you? Any?

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I agree 100% with rocksolid as well.

I also have some questions. I remember back when you had a post about his back. Kissing spine or something? Personally I think that 'disorder' is almost 100% bogus, flame and disagree if you will, that's MY opinion. But what I don't understand is why you won't ride him/jump when your vet said he is perfectly sound and fine? And is this the same vet that says he needs surgery? How can a horse be sound to jump, but then still need surgery?

My personal experience and opinion is similar to Rocksolid's about horses and pain-they don't wait till for certain moments or days. Additionally, most of the time I believe it is an attitude and training thing because I have had my own horses jump for me and then be on 3 legs because they stepped on a rock- but they would have kept on jumping and running. Many people like to find a medical reason why their horse is a jerk or pissy or they can't ride it, when really it's just training and a professional would not have those same issues.

I guess I'm just slightly frustrated because as others said, this horse is one of the few we have seen that actually suits you and now that you are thinking about stopping your progress with him is disappointing.

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I agree 100% with rocksolid as well.

I also have some questions. I remember back when you had a post about his back. Kissing spine or something? Personally I think that 'disorder' is almost 100% bogus, flame and disagree if you will, that's MY opinion. But what I don't understand is why you won't ride him/jump when your vet said he is perfectly sound and fine? And is this the same vet that says he needs surgery? How can a horse be sound to jump, but then still need surgery?

My personal experience and opinion is similar to Rocksolid's about horses and pain-they don't wait till for certain moments or days. Additionally, most of the time I believe it is an attitude and training thing because I have had my own horses jump for me and then be on 3 legs because they stepped on a rock- but they would have kept on jumping and running. Many people like to find a medical reason why their horse is a jerk or pissy or they can't ride it, when really it's just training and a professional would not have those same issues.

I guess I'm just slightly frustrated because as others said, this horse is one of the few we have seen that actually suits you and now that you are thinking about stopping your progress with him is disappointing.

I'm not going to get involved in all this really, but Kissing Spine is real. My good friend's horse had it and also had the surgery to fix it.. unfortunately he passed away from something else unrelated before they were able to rehab him, but he acted much like Taylor does when he got fatigued.

edited because I am a grammar fool

Edited by TheBigRedDog

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