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reidhorsegrl10

Bits...

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Seriously, if I can retrain my mare who will lean to the point of giving you blisters with plain leather reins to being soft in a fat oval-mouth bit, no blisters in web reins, it can be done on almost any horse. So if you really want the horse to be soft and supple and responsive, ditch the harsh bit and find a good trainer instead. All of mine go in super-soft bits, and they are all light and responsive because I've trained them to be that way. Even the hot mare is responsive over fences in a soft bit.

There is a difference in finding a bit the horse is comfortable wearing and in finding a bit that will control the horse. I'm all about finding a soft bit that the horse likes. Slow twists, corkscrews, twisted wires, etc, have no place in a horse's mouth though. If I wouldn't want someone pulling on my face in it, I won't put it on my horse. Period.

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Yesterday I went to the tack store and got a French Link Dee Ring and it works great!!! It felt so great to get the O-Ring out of his mouth and get something much softer and actually can see that he is working awesome in it!! Finger's crossed that this is on an upward climb from here on out!! (I'm sure we will still have our bumps in the road, that is just normal) :yahoo:

Thanks again for all your help!! And for getting me to realize what I actually did have in his mouth :surrender:

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Yesterday I went to the tack store and got a French Link Dee Ring and it works great!!! It felt so great to get the O-Ring out of his mouth and get something much softer and actually can see that he is working awesome in it!! Finger's crossed that this is on an upward climb from here on out!! (I'm sure we will still have our bumps in the road, that is just normal) :yahoo:

:yahoo:

I'm so glad that's working out so well so far! Patience and consistency will make it work long term too, so I'm sure you'll do awesome.

:yahoo:

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:yahoo:

I'm so glad that's working out so well so far! Patience and consistency will make it work long term too, so I'm sure you'll do awesome.

:yahoo:

Thank you!! That's my goal is to work him 5 days a week at least and not to get in a rush with anything!! I am so excited about this guy and seeing what we can do together!!

I've also been watching videos of Jane Savoie, she is amazing with her methods of teaching!!! Makes it so much easier to understand! Although I have no intentions of doing dressage it puts a great foundation on a horse!!

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Thank you!! That's my goal is to work him 5 days a week at least and not to get in a rush with anything!! I am so excited about this guy and seeing what we can do together!!

I've also been watching videos of Jane Savoie, she is amazing with her methods of teaching!!! Makes it so much easier to understand! Although I have no intentions of doing dressage it puts a great foundation on a horse!!

She's super... check out Sally Swift too.

I'm a huge believer in Greg Best for jumping, but good dressage is good for everything.

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This isn't meant to be an attack on you. I'm aiming to point out something very important before serious harm comes to you or your horse from pure ignorance. The bit you said you were using is one of the harshest conventional bits on the market for english riding. There's one very important reason that western riders can use bits much harsher than the one you mentioned. English riders ride with contact. Many western disciplines avoid contact, relying on the fine training of neck reining. Doesn't matter as much what's in the horse's mouth if you ride with a two feet of slack in the reins and don't touch the bit. Makes a huge difference when you're holding 3-10 pounds of pressure on it all the time as most english disciplines would. If your horse is stiff or resistant in this bit, leaning, pulling, NO bit will solve this. This is a TRAINING problem. A bit is only a band-aid at that point.

^^^ Im a western girl myself, never ridden English until a few months ago, but this is exactly right.

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Western background is going to have taught you very different bitting lessons than an english background would have.

I know several western trainers that will put a huge leverage bit with a single twisted wire mouthpiece on two and three year olds as they break them, and they ride those bits with draw reins only for a minimum of 4-6 weeks to make the horse "broke in the face/neck/head/mouth/poll/etc." I'd say a great number, if not a vast majority of english riders and trainers will visibly flinch at that thought and reality.

Just wanted to say, you know some really really crappy western trainers. I rode western almost all my life (ride dressage now), and I have never met a trainer who did that. So do not assume b/c she rides western, she has had crappy experience with bits or that what you have seen in western trainers is the norm.

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Just wanted to say, you know some really really crappy western trainers. I rode western almost all my life (ride dressage now), and I have never met a trainer who did that. So do not assume b/c she rides western, she has had crappy experience with bits or that what you have seen in western trainers is the norm.

This ^

I have seen western trainer do stuff like that. And I have seen western trainers that ride i'n a smooth o-ring with a running.

I personly have never seen anyone do the above mentioned combo. But I have seen many trainer start horses is a Bosal. When it comes time to go i'n a snaffle they have both on. And same when they go to a curb.

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