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SillyFilly27

Taking A Fence With A Landing Pole- Dangerous?

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I'm asking this question as more of a discussion, not looking for any right or wrong answer!

I was riding with another boarder today and we had decided to set up some jumps. I suggested we do some easy grid work, maybe a pole to a fence to a pole, nothing too difficult at all, all set in line as if to take in a bounce. She responded that she couldn't do that, that her trainer had told her that if she was to jump and have a landing pole that her trainer would drop her. Her trainer had told her it was too dangerous to ever jump with a pole after a fence. :confused0024:

Now this really confused me, as I've worked with several different trainers that really utilize a pole after a fence to help with keeping a horse from bolting, or to help a rider hold their two-point position, or just incorporating it into a line. The pole being used more as a visual to make the horse think, but not really being much of anything except to slow down and pay attention. I used them a lot with my own speedy TB which really helped him! As long as the pole is set at a correct distance, I don't see this being dangerous. Just as if a line was set incorrectly- that could be just as dangerous.

Any other opinions on this?

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When I was a junior, I jumped virtually everything with a landing pole because it was the only thing that got me to sit up over/after fences. Total mental thing now that I'm older/more mature as a rider, yet I still occasionally am schooled up by my trainer with them.

That being said; my horse as a junior was safe, careful and honest. I felt safe riding over them with him. I don't necessarily know if I'd use them on a horse that was still pretty green.

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Yep, used them plenty, especially when Marly was green -- he liked to leave out strides in grids even more than now. A one-stride the middle of a grid could very easily become a bounce if there wasn't a pole to make him set his feet down.

Now, safety wise? Jumping itself isn't safe. And yeah, a landing pole could be dangerous on a green or clumsy horse. But if you're jumping a horse that's clumsy enough to not be able to handle a landing pole (assuming it's set correctly)...then I'd say you should be concerned with more than just landing poles.

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Just like any tool- can be incredibly effective when used correctly and in the right situation. Also has potential for serious abuse.

I use poles more often 3-5 strides from the fence on both front and back side to help teach stride consistency before and after the jump.

A pole close after the jump- a bounce or short one stride can be incredibly effective in getting a horse to change their balance after landing and has been really helpful in teaching my young mare to bring had butt under instead of continuing on heavy and long in the front. Since the mare's style is much tighter and more powerful in the back than front- her back end sometimes over-jumps the front. Using a pole a short one-stride away (we started with a short 3, then progressed to a short 2, now we do a short 1) helps her sit up in the front without so much strong input from me. I'm not terribly big and have a short upper body- so it gets really tiring for me (my abs!) to have to completely change her balance after every jump. Teaching her to do it on her own gives me the ability to do more in a line or combination and keeps me from getting worn out halfway around the power and speed or before the jump off.

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Thanks for the input! Kind of what I figured. I'm sure her trainer has had a bad experience with landing poles, but I still believe if set at the appropriate distance are more effective than dangerous. I'm just not one to follow a trainer blindly- you get weird information like this!

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