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Sakura18

Is 20 Too Old To Breed?

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I am wanting to get a foal out of Pretty Girl. She is registered with good lines(so i've been told). I want to get a half-arab to do local sorting/next trail partner. I know Arabians aren't known for sorting/cow work,but I'm wanting to cross her with a cowbred paint. I found a nice stallion with good conformation. She is the best mare I have ever owned. She defeneitly isn't for beginners,and is so full of personality. She loves people and is incredibly smart. My MIL is insistant that 20 is too old to breed. She does have a swayback,so i am wondering if this would hurt her further. :questionicon::confused0024:

Daal Debutante

125m6mt.jpg

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((the cuts on her hind pasterns/fetlocks are gone now,she fell while riding and somehow got scraped there.))

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There is no easy answer for that question. For some mares, yes, 20 is far too old. For others, they will produce into mid-20's with some ease. Her overall health will be of primary concern. Has she foaled before? How long ago? You have the fact that she's Arabian going for you. Keep in mind that foaling complications including middle uterine artery ruptures increase with age. You need to ask yourself if the risk of losing your mare during foaling is an acceptable risk.

The best I can recommend would be to have her evaluated by your veterinarian first. General physical examination and reproductive evaluation.

Edited by cvm2002

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please keep in mind also the foal may not turn out like the mother, it could be an out of control azzhole. so you have to ask if you need to sell is there a market for the foal to be.

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I do have to agree with cvm, has she been bred before

? If she's never been bred I definitely wouldn't risk it. Do take to heart the other questions asked too.

What about looking for a nice Pinto along the lines of what you'd want to her have? You could get a weanling if what you're wanting is a youngster to start out with.

If you do decide you still want to do this please PLEASE make sure she's checked out by a vet before hand. They can tell you if her female bits are still good or not.

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Arabians aren't known for sorting/cow work

Begging your pardon, but many of them are quite good at it.

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Well she isn't cowy,she is VERY wary of cows. Didn't mean it like that Oz! I meant it as she isn't good around cows. She doesn't turn tail and run,just snorts the entire way while pushing them. :happy0203:

Of course I would get a vet check before i breed. :smilie: She has foaled,i just don't know when. I will try to look it up on AHA.

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We are breeding one of our mares this year. She is 21 I believe this year. Vet checked well, and is in very good condition, and has foaled well many times. Though with her age I believe this is the last year we will be breeding her.

~stars

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I have decided NOT to breed her. I will just get another Arabian with the lines I want. I don't want her to end up like Spiffy. I know that I can pay for the proper vet checks...but it just doesn't seem like the thing to do to the Old Girl.

Repeat:I will not be breeding! :smilie:

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so maybe in some odd way Spiffys foals didnt die completely in vain. lets hope their little lives saved your mares. silver lining? :angel3:

Edited by fastfilly79

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depends on the mare. We have two mares that are 19 breeding right now.

THey usually have big beautiful strong foals sometimes healthier than the younger mare whos 6.

But we feed them extremely well and have them evaluated by a vet always to make sure they are still fit to breed.

But this is what they look like right now.

This is the one mare when we dropped her off to be bred ahe had foaled 7 days before this picture:

med_gallery_23421_1447_107978.jpg

we had the vet check her out after the foaling and she was very impressed with how good everything looked. she generally has very easy and fast foaling.

meanwhile the 6 year old I've had to pull her foals before.

So sometimes it's perfectly fine, we just always make sure our mares are healthy and ready to produce and base our breeding decisions on that.

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Just figured I would update you guys,i have not/will not breed her. But I did rescue a colt from 'the truck'. He was abandoned at the sale barn. He ia skinny,womy,and has a large splinter. A young girl wanted him,but she was going to keep him a atud. She finally gave up bidding when she saw I wasnt backing down. The kb gave up when we bid,he is a nice guy. I got him for $45,he is a yearligish stud pony.(dont worry,hes getting cut) we think he is a hackney,he is so sweet! and has had good handling,he took wormer great and stood for shots and flyspray. Just letting you all know about my new colt!

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It is recommended that a mare who hasn't has a foal by 16 years shouldn't be bred. That doesn't mean that they won't take but they're past their prime fertility wise and it will be harder on their bodies than a mare that has had a foal before.

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Your choice, your horse. As long as you are responsible for the resulting foal, the business is yours. This mare, a 96 model, bred, but not owned by us, foaled for the first time this year. Neither is for sale, and won't be.

http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/executive+dazzler

ExecutiveDazzlerandfoal.jpg

The foal, Fancy, is now one month old, and will be shown by her owner.

Fancy2.jpg

Bless you, for the rescue.

Edited by Indianshuffler

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